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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking at some Omega vintage watches, specifically the chronos. Wanted to know what would be a fair price for one in 18k.
I recently saw a really nice one, but wasn't sure if it was legit.

Saw it listed here https://www.watchuseek.com/f29/fs-t...ega-cal-27-dual-register-sold-18k-549627.html

Is this watch legitimate? I've never seen this type of crown used on one of these watches. Also the price looked very good to similar watches I've seen listed. I also noticed a lemania watch that was almost identical.

Anyone know if these types of watches are water resistant?

Any info. or recommendations on vintage would be much appreciated.

Regards,

Mike
 

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Well, we don't do valuations here and that's essentially a valuation.

I will say IMHO (in my humble opinion) almost ALL vintage Omegas are vastly overpriced. In the current market Omega has been placed by the Swatch Group as a middle high end company. People who don't have a good sense of history (nubies) assume they have always been that way. In reality for much of their history they were just a more conservative version of Tissot. IMHO Longines was the Omega of its times for most watches before 1980.

I hope that helps.
 

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Movement is legit in that watch, but it looks like a redial to me. That'll impact value negatively, without going into numbers.
 

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Jeepers Eeeb. Can't say I agree with you at all. That is an absolutely indefensible statement.
Have to agree with that. Leaving aside the question of whether the vintage pieces are overvalued or not (Pesonal opinion: if they are, then that must apply about 100 times as much to vintage Rolexes!) About the only thing that might impact negatively on the pre quartz crisis Omega (and also the modern one) is volume: in excess of half a million watches a year certainly doesn't make a watch company's output terribly exclusive and detracts from the "special" status. Mind you, Rolex have been getting away with that for decades! Other than that, Omega made movements that were just as accurate and high quality as Longines around that time. And their movements and watches were among the most rugged that you could get. What more can you ask for?!

Hartmut Richter
 

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I own a 60s seamaster and compared to other vintage watches I own the quality is to me far better, and thats just by holding them in my hands never mind the movement.
 

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That's a redial, as stated, but the crown is correct, I have seen it on many old Omegas, including a mint Century which I wear regularly. I may be slightly biased, as I am a watchmaker for Swatch, but IMHO, Omega is good bang for the buck nowadays, especially when compared with other mid luxury companies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's a redial, as stated, but the crown is correct, I have seen it on many old Omegas, including a mint Century which I wear regularly. I may be slightly biased, as I am a watchmaker for Swatch, but IMHO, Omega is good bang for the buck nowadays, especially when compared with other mid luxury companies.
Got to say I really like the crown on the watch, that and the buttons look real nice IMHO. It's a shame it already sold :( I guess I'll know for next time.

On the subject of redials ect... How much of an issue is it to get a frankenstein type of watch? I see some watches on ebay out of Argentina that look to be from a watchmaker that specializes in bringing the omegas back to life. Makes custom parts I suppose to salvage Omegas.

Wondering what's a fair why to "value" a watch of this type.

Mike
 

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Jeepers Eeeb. Can't say I agree with you at all. That is an absolutely indefensible statement.
Well, maybe it would help if I stated I have a lot of respect for Tissot?? :think: But I do have more respect for Longines. I've just never caught onto the vintage Omega bandwagon. The 70s seems to have been the crossover decade between the two companies.... to me at least.

I realize this opinion swims against the current. But I don't think it is absolutely indefensible. (If Dennis were still around he might chime in and help me here... alas.)
 

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I have seen firsthand some of the Frankens from Argentina, and also the Ukraine. They are certainly not making parts to restore the watches, rather, they are cobbled together from several non running watches. Personally, I don't mind a redial if it is a good one, but it depends on the watch. A true collector's item, and one that is rare, should be original, IMHO. Of course the redial affects the price negatively, but if the watch is in good condition except for the dial, it can make sense to redial it especially if you want to wear it. Again, depends on the watch. My friend from school got his vintage Navitimer redialed by International, and it was a very good job. The original dial looked like crap, and now the watch is a stunner. It is one he intends to keep, so no issues arising from a sale point of view.
As for the watch in question, it is in excellent condition, but for the redial. Possibly the original was unusable, (the hands show signs of corrosion still) and since they were servicing and polishing it for sale, they figured it would be best to have a clean looking dial to match the watch. The gold content notwithstanding, I think the price is a shade high.
 

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Early Omega chronos were little different from maker Lemania's own. Today about 1/2 price for same Lemania movement. First waterproof omega chrono was also identical Lemania. Serial 14000 here.
 

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In the 1930's the average price of a Tissot was always higher than Omega. Prices in Swiss Francs from Tissot: 150 Years of History by Fallet.

Year
Tissot
Omega
1930
43.00
32.20
1931
31.87
29.57
1932
30.68
27.20
1933
28.16
23.75
1934
24.75
22.65
1935
23.11
19.51
1936
21.43
19.40
1937
25.59
21.17
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have seen firsthand some of the Frankens from Argentina, and also the Ukraine. They are certainly not making parts to restore the watches, rather, they are cobbled together from several non running watches. Personally, I don't mind a redial if it is a good one, but it depends on the watch. A true collector's item, and one that is rare, should be original, IMHO. Of course the redial affects the price negatively, but if the watch is in good condition except for the dial, it can make sense to redial it especially if you want to wear it. Again, depends on the watch. My friend from school got his vintage Navitimer redialed by International, and it was a very good job. The original dial looked like crap, and now the watch is a stunner. It is one he intends to keep, so no issues arising from a sale point of view.
As for the watch in question, it is in excellent condition, but for the redial. Possibly the original was unusable, (the hands show signs of corrosion still) and since they were servicing and polishing it for sale, they figured it would be best to have a clean looking dial to match the watch. The gold content notwithstanding, I think the price is a shade high.
Where can I find good deals on vintage watches? Only place I've been able to find things is Ebay. Some of the websites I've seen are a bit questionable...

Mike
 

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That's interesting stuff, Marrick, and I can't say I have ever come across a Tissot from the 30's. Omegas, yes. I've seen pics, of course, but the actual item seems elusive. Mike, the best place to find vintage watches, in my experience, is flea markets and estate sales and church rummage sales, that sort of thing. I often find good watches and parts at the flea markets in particular, and for reasonable prices. I've found Mido's, Zenith, Rolex, Omega, you name it. Sometimes you can find a forgotten defunct Swiss brand with a nice movt inside, simply ask the vendor to show you the movt, to see it running. Many times the maker's logo will be under the balance, but in the really old watches, it usually isn't. The ESA manufactures will have a letter(s) inside a shield, like AS, P, ETA, etc.
 

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That's interesting stuff, Marrick, and I can't say I have ever come across a Tissot from the 30's.
There must be a few out there! Expanded the table from the same source:

Year
Tissot
No. Sold
Omega
No. Sold
1930
43.00
20874
32.20
25691
193131.87
20453
29.57
12645
193230.68
11368
27.20
6052
193328.16
17482
23.75
11781
193424.75
27872
22.65
16378
193523.11
51354
19.51
19312
193621.43
78657
19.40
23332
193725.59
80336
21.1731716

Not only were Tissot a higher priced watch, but in volume terms they were outselling Omegas by 3.3x in 1936 and 2.5x in 1937.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's interesting stuff, Marrick, and I can't say I have ever come across a Tissot from the 30's. Omegas, yes. I've seen pics, of course, but the actual item seems elusive. Mike, the best place to find vintage watches, in my experience, is flea markets and estate sales and church rummage sales, that sort of thing. I often find good watches and parts at the flea markets in particular, and for reasonable prices. I've found Mido's, Zenith, Rolex, Omega, you name it. Sometimes you can find a forgotten defunct Swiss brand with a nice movt inside, simply ask the vendor to show you the movt, to see it running. Many times the maker's logo will be under the balance, but in the really old watches, it usually isn't. The ESA manufactures will have a letter(s) inside a shield, like AS, P, ETA, etc.
Interesting. Unfortunately in my part of the world, I don't find such flea markets, just don't get to see that kind of thing for sale. Usually just some junk or local craftsmen type stuff.

Mike
 

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There must be a few out there! Expanded the table from the same source:

Year
Tissot

No. Sold

Omega

No. Sold

1930
43.00

20874
32.20

25691
1931
31.87

20453
29.57

12645
1932
30.68

11368
27.20
6052
1933
28.16

17482
23.75

11781
1934
24.75

27872
22.65

16378
1935
23.11

51354
19.51

19312
1936
21.43

78657
19.40

23332
1937
25.59

80336
21.17
31716


Not only were Tissot a higher priced watch, but in volume terms they were outselling Omegas by 3.3x in 1936 and 2.5x in 1937.
That's an interesting table but it doesn't tie in with Omega serial numbers.
According to most databases, Omega made around a million and a half watches
between these dates, but your table shows they sold only around one hundred
and fifty thousand.
Tissots from the thirties would seem uncommon compared to thirties Omegas, I can't
believe they were outselling Omega three to one.
 

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Here it is in the book:

Tiisot Omega.JPG

The 1937 total value figure for Tissot has a typo - the zero after the 1 shouldn't be there. Otherwise, it seems to be fairly authoritative, albeit with some rounding here and there. It could, possibly, include some own label production. Oh and the last figures for PW and WW - 62% for each - must be wrong. (62 + 62 does not = 100).
 

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Here it is in the book:



The 1937 total value figure for Tissot has a typo - the zero after the 1 shouldn't be there. Otherwise, it seems to be fairly authoritative, albeit with some rounding here and there. It could, possibly, include some own label production. Oh and the last figures for PW and WW - 62% for each - must be wrong. (62 + 62 does not = 100).
I think these figures in the table could record the total Tissot sales for these years. The Omega sales possibly
refer to Tissot/Omegas which are quite rare.

These two companies had a merger of some sort in the thirties and formed SSIH, I don't think this document is refering
to mainstream branded Omegas but the Tissot Omegas which were created as a result of the merger and Tissot has included
them in their total sales as they had a hand in producing them.

I.e they could all be Tissot watches on this summary of management reports and the Omegas mentioned in this document might have
nothing to do with the price nor quantity of non Tissot/Omega Omegas of which 1.5 million were produced at possibly a higher average
price than these but I don't know really.
 
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