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Hello,

Got yesterday this watch. Still didn't had time to clean it.
Hallmarks identifies it as Swiss made, assayer mark seams to be from Geneve, imported to England at 1915.
Enamel dial, blued hands, silver case with double back doors.
Not sure if chronograph second hand is original.
Size is 35 mm without the crown, dial is 30mm wide, caliber seems to be 13 lignes

Any guesses on maker? Would appreciate any feedback.


trench-1.jpg
trench-2.jpg
trench-3.jpg
 

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All I can add is importer mark is LW, but didn't find him/her
Its a GREAT piece. Ilove it
 

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Woow, it's a nice early piece. I see something under the balance wheel kind of ' 090 '? Not sure if Lugrin had wrist chronos at that time. Moeris,Martel and Breitling comes first in my mind for that era chronograph manufacturers. Dial side of the movement might have some marks. I wanted to say that it might be well re-cased into a wrist watch case, but it looks like a perfect fit - sounds like 13 lignes movement too early for a wristwatch for that time. Just thinking loud...
 

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Woow, it's a nice early piece. I see something under the balance wheel kind of ' 090 '? Not sure if Lugrin had wrist chronos at that time. Moeris,Martel and Breitling comes first in my mind for that era chronograph manufacturers. Dial side of the movement might have some marks. I wanted to say that it might be well re-cased into a wrist watch case, but it looks like a perfect fit - sounds like 13 lignes movement too early for a wristwatch for that time. Just thinking loud...
No, I think ALWAYS a wristwatch
1915 is not so impossible
In Europe we have wristwatch from 1904, and surely by 1914/15 chronograph wristwatch.
I have a 1913 Gallet on display at the Museum. I will post a picture.

Regards
PS - This may be a Gallet??
 

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The pin set is unusual (though it makes sense given that they're using the crown for the chronograph pusher). The finish on the chronograph parts is extremely well done, while the base movement (although decent) is pretty stock. That suggests to me that this was done as a sort of "customization" by a dedicated chronograph specialist on top of a generic ebauche. Probably original to the case, since there's only one set of case screw marks, and it would take a fair amount of work to refit a generic case to fit something like this.
 

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It's very interesting to me that it is an authentic wristwatch chronograph that looks to be pin set(?). I would fight you for it if given the chance! ;-)

Edit: Or is the pin/pusher used for some other purpose?
 

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Great Watch,

Not sure about the movement. The Sponsors mark L.W. is probably Louis Weill



1908..1918
(registered Jan 1907)

Imported watch case

Holborn Circus, London




London Makers Marks - L

Marc
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Just noticed that my thread was just moved, I've thought it was deleted.
Thanks all of you for the feedbacks.

It seems that there is really 090 or 060 stamp beneath balance. Don't know if this adds any info.

trench-4.jpg


Here is Gallet Multichron. It doesn't has the pin set and dial look a little different.
gallet_multichron_30_1_300.jpg

Unfortunately, I'm unable to find photos of movements of early wrist chronographs to make comparison..
Here is also Longines from 1913 that looks a little bit more similar.
 

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Great Watch,

Not sure about the movement. The Sponsors mark L.W. is probably Louis Weill



1908..1918
(registered Jan 1907)

Imported watch case

Holborn Circus, London




London Makers Marks - L

Marc
from London Data Letter "U" for 1915
london date letter.jpg

Always on the site "chronographen.faszination-uhrwerk.de"
I found a chronograph Lugrin. if you look at the layout. the springs and the arrangement of the screws. you see that is the same chrono. perhaps Lugrin provided the Moeris. the two separate bridges were also used in the Moeris 19 lines

lugrin12.jpg
Ganz bemerkenswert war dann die Konstruktion der 13‘‘‘-Chronographen, die Anfang des 1.Weltkrieges auf den Markt kamen. Diese Armbanduhren gab es mit rechts und auch links angesetzter Krone - nicht etwa für Linkshänder, sondern zum Tragen am rechten Arm !


Quite remarkable was then the construction of the 13'' 'chronograph that came on the market at the beginning of the 1st World War. These watches were there with the right and also left an attached crown - not for left-handed, but to carry on his right arm!

moeris19.jpg
regards enrico
 

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Great stuff Enrico
Gallet also made a chronograph 1913. I have it on display at NAWCC.
I also have a copy of it in Gallet 1913 catalog
That is with crown on right hand side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks all in this thread and especially to Enrico.

I believe now that it's Jeanneret watch.

samuel-jeannere-alfred-lugrin-13-lines-1.jpg

They were produced chronograph movements based on patent from Lugrin.
I don't know, if they developed this caliber basing on Lugrin 13" one, or this is pure Lugrin's design.
samuel-jeannere-alfred-lugrin-13-lines-2.jpg

Jeanneret company has complex history in the 1900s, dividing on several companies.
jeanneret.jpg

But I'm believe that my watch are from Samuel Jeanneret, as he seems to be first introduced wrist chronograph.

Sources
http://www.invenitetfecit.com/modeles/excelsior_park_jeanneret_st_imier_en.html
http://chronographen.faszination-uhrwerk.de/jeanneret_dit_grosjean.pdf
 

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First Chronograph was 1816??
I think before yours
Next 1844 Adolphe Nicole
 

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Sorry, I wasn't clear enough.
I mean the first wrist chronograph from the Jeanneret ancestors.
Understand - thanks
adam
 
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