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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
You know the beginning of the watchman's creed, - This is my watch. There are many like it but this one is mine... Wait a minute... No! Rifles! It's about rifles. My bad.
Anyways, that's not something that can be said about my 1930's jump hour tank. It's quite special and there are not that many like it. But this one is mine.

First off. Here's the watch I'm talking about.
15605897


There are several things that makes this watch special. Chief of which is the engraved car on the caseback. The 1933 land speed record Bluebird driven by sir Malcolm Campbell.
15605900

15605901


I don't really have any knowledge about why, how, who did it or where the engraving came to be. All I know is that it's there and it doesn't seem to be a lot of these watches out there. I don't even know who made the case or what year it's from.
More on the Sherlock Holmes-ing further down.
15605903


Since I don't know his birth name, I call him Tanky McTankface. They kind of asked for it by not putting the manufacturer's name on it...

The specs of this beast of a watch.
Width: 23.5mm
Lug to lug: 38mm
Thickness: 6mm
Lug width: 16mm
Weight: 35g (on bonklip bamboo bracelet)
Movement: Felsa 107 manual wind 3 disc jump hour. Non hacking. Approximately 36h power reserve.

The front case hinges to the caseback at the top and the movement is pressure fitted to the caseback. The crystal is some kind of relatively flexible plastic.

The dimensions are quite large for a tank of that era. Most come in at least 3-4mm smaller L2L, making it about the size of a medium Reverso of today and slightly larger than a large Cartier Basculante.
And it's clean. No over the top art deco design. Just a straight forward three disc jump hour tank. The subtle slope to the polished edges and the slightly inward angled lugs gives the three "dial holes" room to breath, and besides the two disc Cartier and Marconi jumpies I've seen, this must be one of the cleaner watch faces ever made.
15605951


When it comes to wearability, there's nothing to complain about. It's light and comfortable on pretty much any strap I've tried. The Bamboo is my favourite, even though it probably wouldn't have been available when the watch came out and is made from stainless where the case is made from chrome plated base metal. I honestly don't even notice the difference in color between the bracelet and the case.
15605964


When I first got the watch and started to research it I thought it had an AS370 movement like the ones fitted to the Marconi jump hours (amongst others) during this period. It would have been nice from a spare part perspective. However. It turns out to be a Felsa 107 and as you can see from the photos below, there's some need for at least one spare part.
15605921

15605922

15605923


I need a better minutes disc. A better seconds disc would be great as well, but let's not get greedy. I'm always on the lookout, but so far, no luck.

There are no markings on the inside of the case but apart from the Bluebird, there's a number engraved on the caseback.
353294. I bet it meant something back then. But I have very little use for that number today. A name would have been better for me...
15605928


The case is in remarkable condition for being almost a hundred years. The year is an estimate based on the engraving. It seems logical that the engraving would have been done at the same(ish) time as the record was set, which narrows it down to sometime around 1933.

I have seen a picture of an identical watch and someone in a land speed record group on FB has a friend who has one. It might be the one I've seen photos of, so I can't say for sure if there are two or three known to exist. This fact makes it more likely this had some official connection to the Bluebird project, rather than being the act of a lonely madman.
15605981


There are two potential sources of information.
The guy on Facebook's buddie may know more. I sent him a message a while ago, but no response so far. Busy guy, I guess...
But the curator at the Campbell museum may know everything. However, due to the plague, they're currently closed. So I'll have to wait to find out if I get to know anything more. Unless one of you guys knows anything?

The watch was bought at an auction in Brittain a couple of years ago for hundreds of thousands of pounds, at least. It then found its way to Sweden and ended up with me.

It recently got serviced and got a new balance. Runs like a champ!
It's one of my absolute favorite watches.
15605993


I hope you enjoyed my little presentation. Have you seen this watch before over the years? Or one like it without the Bluebird?
Does anybody have a minute disc for a Felsa 107 just laying around? Let me know.

15605997
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cool watch - especially with the bluebird engraving. I had one of these but with age comes weakening eyesight and I found it harder and harder to tell the time through the tiny portals.

View attachment 15606066

Regards,
Thanks!

Yours was a sweet one as well. Locks a bit smaller than mine and the lugs are sharper on that one. Looks really nice on that strap. I think I'll have to try something like that on mine too.

I agree it's difficult to read. Especially in bright or dim light. Any light really. I'm hoping it would get better with a better minutes disc, but most likely, my eyesight will be deteriorating faster than I can find one and once I get it it will probably be too late anyways.😁
To be honest, I usually wear mine on the right arm as a piece of jewelry... It's often more or less impossible to get an accurate reading and I refuse to look at my phone. So more often than not, Tanky on the right and a diver on the left.
15606081


Yours looks to have been in good shape. Clean discs as far as I can see. Do you know who the manufacturer was of yours?
 

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I think I have at least one more somewhere, and you can get pocket watch versions. Simple dial side conversion and I’ve seen mostly on AS movements.

Given the similarities in cases, cutouts and the kit itself I’m pretty sure this was a kit sold to various manufacturers but I have no idea who made them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·


I think I have at least one more somewhere, and you can get pocket watch versions. Simple dial side conversion and I’ve seen mostly on AS movements.

Given the similarities in cases, cutouts and the kit itself I’m pretty sure this was a kit sold to various manufacturers but I have no idea who made them.
Nice Collection!
I think you are right about there being a casemaker who sold these cases to many different manufacturer's back in the day.

Yours seems to all be of the smaller version, like the one @James A showed us earlier and I think they all come with the as370 movement. The layout is similar on the Felsa 107 but the discs are attached in a different way.

Are any of yours running?
 

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@[BOBO] great watch, great story, great pics ! Great X3! Cheers, S

On a historical point, I checked on the Bluebird and found the record was set slightly surprisingly at Daytona - not being a ‘speed aficionado’, I was expecting the setting to be the Bonneville Salt Flats which is used for higher speeds in recent records ...instead of a race track....

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@Sdasurrey
I believe the run was made on the actual beach at Daytona.
I'm not sure why. I could ask the guys over at the land speed record group why the record was set at Daytona rather than Bonneville.

15606613
 

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@Sdasurrey
I believe the run was made on the actual beach at Daytona.
I'm not sure why. I could ask the guys over at the land speed record group why the record was set at Daytona rather than Bonneville.

View attachment 15606613
Yes, you're right, so I am surprised X2 ! I just found a Bluebird video from 1931 on the beach in Daytona Beach for one of the pre-1933 speed records. I would have thought sand was a little harder to drive fast on but I guess if the tide just went out it's not so bad, and the car is actually running not that far from the water and the beach is flat there kind of like Bonneville, cheers again ! S
 
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Hi again... sorry to go down the 'speed rabbit hole' in your great vintage watch post (personally jump hour watches don't fit that well in my normal vintage collector verticals..) Daytona was used for speeds records mostly from the 20s to the mid 30s and then Bonneville was used from around 1935/6 onward except for a few records in Australia, in 1964 (James A did you watch that one ?!). There were a few from 1908-22 actually here in Surrey about a mile from where I live at Brooklands, the first UK purpose built racing track which opened around that time.

The large banked curves are still around in front of a Tesco Grocery Store ! Cheers for the 'speed enlightenment' and vintage watch ! S

Motor vehicle Road Road surface Land vehicle Automotive parking light
 

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You know the beginning of the watchman's Creed, - This is my watch. There are many like it but this one is mine... Wait a minute... No! Rifles! It's about rifles. My bad.
Anyways, that's not something that can be said about my 1930's jump hour tank. It's quite special and there are not that many like it. But this one is mine.

First off. Here's the watch I'm talking about.
View attachment 15605897

There are several things that makes this watch special. Chief of which is the engraved car on the caseback. The 1933 land speed record Bluebird driven by sir Malcolm Campbell.
View attachment 15605900
View attachment 15605901

I don't really have any knowledge about why, how, who did it or where the engraving came to be. All I know is that it's there and it doesn't seem to be a lot of these watches out there. I don't even know who made the case or what year it's from.
More on the Sherlock Holmes-ing further down.
View attachment 15605903

Since I don't know his birth name, I call him Tanky McTankface. They kind of asked for it by not putting the manufacturer's name on it...

The specs of this beast of a watch.
Width: 23.5mm
Lug to lug: 38mm
Thickness: 6mm
Lug width: 16mm
Weight: 35g (on bonklip bamboo bracelet)
Movement: Felsa 107 manual wind 3 disc jump hour. Non hacking. Approximately 36h power reserve.

The front case hinges to the caseback at the top and the movement is pressure fitted to the caseback. The crystal is some kind of relatively flexible plastic.

The dimensions are quite large for a tank of that era. Most come in at least 3-4mm smaller L2L, making it about the size of a medium Reverso of today and slightly larger than a large Cartier Basculante.
And it's clean. No over the top art deco design. Just a straight forward three disc jump hour tank. The subtle slope to the polished edges and the slightly inward angled lugs gives the three "dial holes" room to breath, and besides the two disc Cartier and Marconi jumpies I've seen, this must be one of the cleaner watch faces ever made.
View attachment 15605951

When it comes to wearability, there's nothing to complain about. It's light and comfortable on pretty much any strap I've tried. The Bamboo is my favourite, even though it probably wouldn't have been available when the watch came out and is made from stainless where the case is made from chrome plated base metal. I honestly don't even notice the difference in color between the bracelet and the case.
View attachment 15605964

When I first got the watch and started to research it I thought it had an AS370 movement like the ones fitted to the Marconi jump hours (amongst others) during this period. It would have been nice from a spare part perspective. However. It turns out to be a Felsa 107 and as you can see from the photos below, there's some need for at least one spare part.
View attachment 15605921
View attachment 15605922
View attachment 15605923

I need a better minutes disc. A better seconds disc would be great as well, but let's not get greedy. I'm always on the lookout, but so far, no luck.

There are no markings on the inside of the case but apart from the Bluebird, there's a number engraved on the caseback.
353294. I bet it meant something back then. But I have very little use for that number today. A name would have been better for me...
View attachment 15605928

The case is in remarkable condition for being almost a hundred years. The year is an estimate based on the engraving. It seems logical that the engraving would have been done at the same(ish) time as the record was set, which narrows it down to sometime around 1933.

I have seen a picture of an identical watch and someone in a land speed record group on FB has a friend who has one. It might be the one I've seen photos of, so I can't say for sure if there are two or three known to exist. This fact makes it more likely this had some official connection to the Bluebird project, rather than being the act of a lonely madman.
View attachment 15605981

There are two potential sources of information.
The guy on Facebook's buddie may know more. I sent him a message a while ago, but no response so far. Busy guy, I guess...
But the curator at the Campbell museum may know everything. However, due to the plague, they're currently closed. So I'll have to wait to find out if I get to know anything more. Unless one of you guys knows anything?

The watch was bought at an auction in Brittain a couple of years ago for hundreds of thousands of pounds, at least. It then found its way to Sweden and ended up with me.

It recently got serviced and got a new balance. Runs like a champ!
It's one of my absolute favorite watches.
View attachment 15605993

I hope you enjoyed my little presentation. Have you seen this watch before over the years? Or one like it without the Bluebird?
Does anybody have a minute disc for a Felsa 107 just laying around? Let me know.

View attachment 15605997
I love jump hour anything, this is definitely a unique watch that I've never seen before. Thanks for sharing!
 

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More nice pics more nice jump hour watch.....nice scenery....just asking, do you also sleep with this watch on ?! S


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
More nice pics more nice jump hour watch.....nice scenery....just asking, do you also sleep with this watch on ?! S


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Thank you very much.😊
No, I always take it of at night. I sleep with other watches on, but never this one.
 

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As for why they ran at Daytona instead of Bonneville pretty much came down to logistics. Bonneville at the time was still very remote and more than 2/3 across the continent while Daytona was on the East Coast. The local amenities in Florida were allot nicer than northern Utah, as well.😉
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
As for why they ran at Daytona instead of Bonneville pretty much came down to logistics. Bonneville at the time was still very remote and more than 2/3 across the continent while Daytona was on the East Coast. The local amenities in Florida were allot nicer than northern Utah, as well.😉
Sounds reasonable.👍🏼
Thanks for the clarification.🙂
 

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As for why they ran at Daytona instead of Bonneville pretty much came down to logistics. Bonneville at the time was still very remote and more than 2/3 across the continent while Daytona was on the East Coast. The local amenities in Florida were allot nicer than northern Utah, as well.
Thanks also - although Utah is not that far from ‘Arid-zona’ with a Z ! S


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Most early speed records in the US happened at Daytona Beach. Sir Malcolm Campbell set several land speed records there with Bluebird between 1928 and March 1935, highest speed 276 mph. However his first run at 300 mph (480 km/h) was at Bonneville Salt Flats in September 1935.
 
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