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Discussion Starter #1
Evening all!
I’ve been trawling around the web for the past month or two, since the vintage watch bug bit me, and seem to pretty much always end up here - so I thought it might be time to sign up:) Particularly as I have a few watches from a recent job lot purchase that I would like to see if I can find some more info on. The first of these is an Omega, manual wind, which I believe is from 1944. I’ve not been able to find an exact match yet online, so confirmation of date, model and movement would be most welcome.
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Apologies in advance if the photos are no good - I can’t really tell from the preview if they’ve loaded right or not:(


 

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No reference number inside the case back? That's odd, but maybe they didn't use that back then? Not sure. The experts will let you know.
 

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Your not the only who got bitten by the vintage trend. Been wearing my Omega Geneve for almost 5 years now. Still keeping time +5 to +8 sec a day so its not too bad for a vintage. I would say is a 1950s made omega. Couldn't see what movement it is.

V/R

madkx.
 

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Your not the only who got bitten by the vintage trend. Been wearing my Omega Geneve for almost 5 years now. Still keeping time +5 to +8 sec a day so its not too bad for a vintage. I would say is a 1950s made omega. Couldn't see what movement it is.

V/R

madkx.
I suspect it is a cal 26.5 variant of some type.
bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: Omega 26.5T3
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi Dan - think you’ve hit the nail on the head with your movement ID. Thanks. The movement number is earlier than the example on Ranfft, which might imply an earlier date than I first thought from the case number. I did check out the case reference number but maybe the website (can’t remember which one) wasn’t giving accurate data? Could anyone point me to a known good source for this kind of info please?
 

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If you google "Omega serial numbers", many different resources will come up. Everyone has their own favorite, but none are official. The movement serial number is generally used to date to date an Omega watch, not the case number.
 

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This chart comes from Omega:

image253.jpg

There are a couple of typos on the dating chart that should be obvious. The case dates are OK. Note that the case and movement numbers should not be the same.

Hope this helps.
gatorcpa
 

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Thanks for this gatorcpa - so according to this the case was made soon after 1943, and the movement sometime between 1926 and 1944. Presumably production ramped up due to the war, so the movement is likely to be from the latter half of this period.
 

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Thanks for this gatorcpa - so according to this the case was made soon after 1943, and the movement sometime between 1926 and 1944. Presumably production ramped up due to the war, so the movement is likely to be from the latter half of this period.
No, not 1926 ... 1934. That is a typo in the table, the years are transposed for 8M and 9M. I guess the typo was not as obvious as @gatorcpa thought. ;-)
 

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No reference number inside the case back? That's odd, but maybe they didn't use that back then? Not sure.
Most brands didn't put reference numbers inside the case back before the 1950s, I don't know for sure for Omega but it's a general observation.

The most interesting feature of your watch is the balance to me. It seems to be made of nickel alloy, which is quite rare for an Omega. Like Longines or Zenith, Omega only used nickel alloy balances very briefly in the late 1930s/early 1940s for special "non magnetic" watches, before switching to Glucydur alloy (those two being offered alongside more classic bimetallic balances until the late 1940s). This is a very good find, it rightfully deserves a good service and some care ;)
 
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