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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Vintage Watchuseekers,
I just want to share my newly serviced and restored 17 jewel Camy watch. You might also know some info and background on it that you may want to share. It has two crowns, the one below is for setting time and winding and the other for a mechanical alarm. Both crowns have the Camy insignia. The alarm has a buzzing sound, and it's not as loud as my Revue Thommen Cricket's alarm.

The casing is also bronze, I think. I don't know if brass was used for casing because both metals look alike and has certain copper content. Before it was serviced, the casing was dark brown; after the service and cleaning, it was golden yellow. I think Camy is still around too. It has a Hong Kong office, and I'm not certain if this model came from the 60s or 70s.

The second crown's plating faded, but it still looks fine to the overall look of the watch. It has been keeping good time too. I don't know what movement it has. The Camy originally had a dark brown strap, but I placed a black crocodile to give it an elegant direction. Thanks for viewing my thread.
 

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Thank you for posting. I am not that familiar with Camy but the case design of the watch would date it to the late 1960s at the earliest. I'd guess 1970s to be more likely.
 

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The movement in your watch is an AS (A. Schild) caliber 1475. This was a very commonly used alarm movement and was made from 1954-1970. You can learn more about it here: AS 1475

The case on your watch is likely made of brass which has been gold-plated. This is likely marked on the case somewhere, perhaps between the lugs. The reason the case appeared brownish before service is that gold alloy plating will tarnish over time. When your watch was serviced no doubt the case was cleaned and lightly polished to removed the tarnish and restore the gold color.

I'd agree with Ray that this watch dates to around 1970 or so.
 

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That's a really neat watch - one I'd buy.:-!

BTW, Camy was founded in 1913, by the Stroun brothers in Grenchen, Switzerland.
 

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The reason why the Vulcain "Cricket" is so loud is the double bottom, the outer of the two having holes so that the noise can get through. That way, there is never anything dampening the "sounding board", i.e. the inner bottom, such as a wrist. Revue Thommen used AS movements in their Crickets after Vulcain had been phased out and the Vulcain movements had run out and they were just as loud.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The movement in your watch is an AS (A. Schild) caliber 1475. This was a very commonly used alarm movement and was made from 1954-1970. You can learn more about it here: AS 1475

The case on your watch is likely made of brass which has been gold-plated. This is likely marked on the case somewhere, perhaps between the lugs. The reason the case appeared brownish before service is that gold alloy plating will tarnish over time. When your watch was serviced no doubt the case was cleaned and lightly polished to removed the tarnish and restore the gold color.

I'd agree with Ray that this watch dates to around 1970 or so.
Hi JimH and Ray,
There is some inscription between the lugs, and attached is its picture. "PLAQUE G20 EPSA", it says. The watch is kind of heavy; that's why I thought the casing was bronze. 'was thinking of the early 70s too in terms of design but needed inputs to be certain. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's a really neat watch - one I'd buy.:-!

BTW, Camy was founded in 1913, by the Stroun brothers in Grenchen, Switzerland.
1913? Wow, I thought Camy just emerged in the 50s or 60s. I'm keeping this one though Marrick. Thanks for the info. There's a 50s Titus though from me in the private sellers forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The reason why the Vulcain "Cricket" is so loud is the double bottom, the outer of the two having holes so that the noise can get through. That way, there is never anything dampening the "sounding board", i.e. the inner bottom, such as a wrist. Revue Thommen used AS movements in their Crickets after Vulcain had been phased out and the Vulcain movements had run out and they were just as loud.

Hartmut Richter
I've read it has a patented resonance chamber to make the alarm loud. I once left the Cricket accidentally set in the office, and when it alarmed, everybody was looking at me... alarmed. "It's small but loud", they said... like a cricket, I guess. Anyway, the Camy has a non-abrasive buzzing sound like a bee compared to the Cricket. You have to let the alarm crown winded and up for it to alarm unlike the Cricket wherein you have the crown down.
 

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Hi JimH and Ray,
There is some inscription between the lugs, and attached is its picture. "PLAQUE G20 EPSA", it says. The watch is kind of heavy; that's why I thought the casing was bronze. 'was thinking of the early 70s too in terms of design but needed inputs to be certain. Thanks.
Folks figured this out once before... all it is saying is a company with the initials EPSA plated 20 microns of gold onto the case. EPSA appears to have done it's work in Switzerland.
 

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Yes, Vulcain patented the "double bottom" principle and even won a lawsuit against Jaeger LeCoultre over it, who wanted to use it for their "Memovox". The nicest "Cricket" story is that about Eisenhower at the press conference. The Cricket was given as a present to President Truman who was so enthusiastic about it that it was given as a present to every US president thereafter, including Eisenhower. He was holding a press conference at which he defended the introduction of stiff import duties on Swiss products when his Cricket went off - quite audibly, of course, giving rise to much mirth among the press representatives!

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes, Vulcain patented the "double bottom" principle and even won a lawsuit against Jaeger LeCoultre over it, who wanted to use it for their "Memovox". The nicest "Cricket" story is that about Eisenhower at the press conference. The Cricket was given as a present to President Truman who was so enthusiastic about it that it was given as a present to every US president thereafter, including Eisenhower. He was holding a press conference at which he defended the introduction of stiff import duties on Swiss products when his Cricket went off - quite audibly, of course, giving rise to much mirth among the press representatives!

Hartmut Richter
Wow! Now that's the best Cricket story. I read in a website too that it was used by Edmund Hillary when he scaled Everest with Tenzing Norgay in the 50s. It says that Hillary needed a loud alarm to wake him up from the sound of the wind and from his slumber to continue trekking Everest. 'don't know if this story is true though.
 

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I doubt it. The general story is that Hilary had a "Rolex" and Tenzing Norgay had a "Smith". Nowadays, most people only remember the Rolex. The power of advertising.....

Hartmut Richter
 
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