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Discussion Starter #1
I can't say I am too happy about the title. I spent about 2 hours in the early morning taking some photos with a new camera. I came home to see how they were and to my dismay everything had a blueish tint as can be seen in the swan photograph. I decided to go back out and play around a little bit more and got the photo of the bird in the first picture. What are some good tips for taking photos on a bright sunny day besides lowering the ISO and using a fast shutter speed?



 

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Use the right white balance?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Use the right white balance?
I kind of figured that one even though I completely blew it. I am hoping next weekend is gorgeous so I can redeem myself.
 

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What camera do you own?

If it is an SLR then make sure you photograph in RAW. Some camera's offer RAW and JPG. It takes up more space, but then you can use the camera software, Photoshop, Lightroom or other RAW editing software to readjust the white balance without affecting the picture quality.
 

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Actually you did a pretty good job, there is lots of useable data there. You just have to figure out how to massage it into the photo you WANT to see. You don't HAVE to shoot raw but it does help if you want to massively edit it later on. I gave this a few tweaks with photoshop. The only thing you can't save is a blurry shot or a shot that's completely white. If you would like to learn how to edit photos lynda.com has very helpful training videos that are short and centered on specific things you want to learn. They are also very reasonably priced. I am not a affiliated, just a happy customer.

 

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Just be glad you are shooting digital and not film... lol
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Actually you did a pretty good job, there is lots of useable data there. You just have to figure out how to massage it into the photo you WANT to see. You don't HAVE to shoot raw but it does help if you want to massively edit it later on. I gave this a few tweaks with photoshop. The only thing you can't save is a blurry shot or a shot that's completely white. If you would like to learn how to edit photos lynda.com has very helpful training videos that are short and centered on specific things you want to learn. They are also very reasonably priced. I am not a affiliated, just a happy customer.
I am trying to stay away from Photoshop, I use to do digital editing in the 90's. I feel that once you start editing the photo it is not original anymore. I found some good information and read up. Haven't had a chance to get out again to take photos. I wanted to see if anyone here had any secrets they wouldn't mind sharing. Thanks for the information.
 

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If you have a digital camera, using Photoshop (or other editing software) is the only way to process your photos correctly. When you took a photo on film and sent it to a lab they did the processing for you. It's not so much a matter of "keeping it original" as correctly processing the original. Most DSLR cameras also have onboard processing parameters you can adjust as well in terms of color and sharpness.
 

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If you have a digital camera, using Photoshop (or other editing software) is the only way to process your photos correctly. When you took a photo on film and sent it to a lab they did the processing for you. It's not so much a matter of "keeping it original" as correctly processing the original. Most DSLR cameras also have onboard processing parameters you can adjust as well in terms of color and sharpness.
I totally agree with this. Anyone who had developed and printed their own pictures using standard film know that there is a lot of work done in the darkroom to get the final print. From using filters, to dodging and burning, etc. (just as in Photoshop), making prints from film requires a lot of processing beyond the actual taking of the picture. Photoshop is basically your "digital darkroom".
 

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Pick up a good polarizing filter to reduce the reflection of sun bouncing off the water and cuts down on glare.

Don't know if you used one, but use a lens shade.

And of course - don't shoot into the sun

Also pick up the book "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. Good reading and helps

DON
 

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Download Adobe Lightroom, this might be enough for you and I am sure one you try the trial you will love it! There is a beta of Lightroom 3 on labs.adobe.com and it is well worth trying out.

I love Photoshop now I need to convince myself not to buy Lightroom also!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Pick up a good polarizing filter to reduce the reflection of sun bouncing off the water and cuts down on glare.

Don't know if you used one, but use a lens shade.

And of course - don't shoot into the sun

Also pick up the book "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. Good reading and helps

DON
Thanks for the suggestions. I picked up a set of 3 filters yesterday and a lens shade. Hopefully this weekend will be sunny and I can get outside. Thanks again!
 

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Download Adobe Lightroom, this might be enough for you and I am sure one you try the trial you will love it! There is a beta of Lightroom 3 on labs.adobe.com and it is well worth trying out.

I love Photoshop now I need to convince myself not to buy Lightroom also!
I have a copy as it came free with my Adobe Master Suite. Never really gave it a try, but I am going to work on my shots first. Hopefully I can avoid using any editing programs.
 

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you can either shoot raw and then you can change the white balance in the camera raw editing software, or, if you shoot JPEGs and want warmer color temp, set the white balance to cloudy and if you're shooting an object that is in the shade, set white balance to shade. Beautiful thing about shooting in raw is that you can make a lot of adjustments to the white balance and even exposure, depending on how you took the original. Downside is that the files are large and fill up the memory card quickly.

Also, be a bit more open minded. You do not have to go crazy editing your images in Photoshop, but think of it as your dark room, yur photo lab. You can alter images in dark room by how you develop film and print your pictures. Same thing in Photoshop. It just allows you to make adjustments and make the final product look the way you want it to look. Even Photoshop Elements is powerful. And there you can also correct white balance by using "Remove Color Cast" option in the Image Adjustments tab. Basically all the images that come out of the DSLR need to be post-processed. If you are trying to produce images that do not need editing, then try different picture styles your camera offers. In some cameras you can customize the parameters like sharpness, contrast, saturation, hue.

Good luck.
 

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This is what the great thing about Adobe Lightroom is, it's all about processing. It doesn't give you the tools to touch individual areas up on your pictures, but it gives you all the processing power to readjust images, bulk apply settings, apply sharpening (if needed). Also it gives you awesome control over your library, you can update and move files around with a great interface. I would totally suggest this. Give the beta a go and I think you'll be surprised about how good it works. Also shoot raw if you can. While *not* needed, it does gives you the most out of your photographs.
 

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Lightroom is great. I shoot a lot of pictures over a racing weekend and, before Lightroom, never would have attempted to do most of the shots in RAW since the post-processing would take far too long. Now, with Lightroom, it's really no more work to deal with RAW than with JPEGs. I find myself using Photoshop less and less these days.
 

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I upgraded my Photoshop CS license to CS 4 last week, I heard that CS won't upgrade to CS 5, so I had to bite the bullet.

I've been using Lightroom for the last week and I love it. Another $200 though is a ......
 

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According to me you did a very good job, there is lots of usable data there. You have to figure out how to massage it into the photo you want to see the people.Would you please tell me which camera you can used for this photography?
 

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Make sure you always shoot RAW, that you're using the latest digital body, L- or ED- series glass, and Adobe CS5 Master Suite, or you won't be able to get good photos. Are you using the fastest possible memory cards and readers?

Seriously, though... it's not about the equipment. You learn by doing, and by making mistakes.
 

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the one thing that i dont believe has been mentioned is the aperature settings. this is what will either make the closer object look 'better' by blurring the background, or blurring the closer object to make the background look better. taking a look at your first photo, try to use a smaller f-stop to blur the background. trial and error
 
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