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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,

I bought a sbdc053 a couple of months ago. It was running around 5-8 seconds a day fast, which is fine with me.

Yesterday, I adjusted the watch, and I noticed it has started to run a couple of seconds slow. I'd much rather have a fast watch than a more accurate slow one.

Is this normal?

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Maybe giver it a few days to settle. I recently purchased a 055. First day it was running 6s fast, but then settled down a few later to 2 s/day. Changing positions when off wrist essentially makes it 0s/day.



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What do you mean by "adjusted the watch"? If you tried to regulate it, +/- 2 seconds is pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What do you mean by "adjusted the watch"? If you tried to regulate it, +/- 2 seconds is pretty good.
I mean I adjusted the time, not fiddled with the inner workings.


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I mean I adjusted the time, not fiddled with the inner workings.


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The confusion being, if you've adjusted the time to make it a little slow. And you don't like it. Can you not just adjust it in the opposite direction and make it a little fast???
 

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Adjusting the time shouldn't affect timekeeping accuracy but the position you put it down when you're not wearing it does. Perhaps you're being inconsistent in positioning (face up, face down, crown up, etc.) That being said, +8/-2 (ish) is well within the accuracy specification of that movement and I don't believe you can get it much better than that. I don't remember what my Sumo is adjusted to these days (I adjust my own watches using a timegrapher) but if it were at +8/-2 I'd leave it alone.
 
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It’s normal, it happened to me many times with all kind of movements. After a while it could start gaining a few secs a day again. It’s a mechanical watch and its timekeeping behavior can change a bit as time goes by and depending on many factors like temperature, predominant wearing/resting position and many others. Even the 2 Rolexes I had changed their behavior like that over the months and years I worn them.
 

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It’s normal, it happened to me many times with all kind of movements. After a while it could start gaining a few secs a day again. It’s a mechanical watch and its timekeeping behavior can change a bit as time goes by and depending on many factors like temperature, predominant wearing/resting position and many others. Even the 2 Rolexes I had changed their behavior like that over the months and years I worn them.
Could you give us an idea of the Rolex's variance? I'm relatively new into mechanicals myself.

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I agree with Kevin that if variations you're seeing is in a range of +8/-2 sec, it's very good. Both for a Rolex or Seiko. My personal standard is anything within 20 sec/day.

To answer the original question directly: Yes, it's completely normal.
 

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Maybe giver it a few days to settle. I recently purchased a 055. First day it was running 6s fast, but then settled down a few later to 2 s/day. Changing positions when off wrist essentially makes it 0s/day.
As others have pointed out the OP's observations and this observation are well within the Seiko specifications.
"Seiko claims an accuracy rating of -15/+25 seconds per day in normal temperature conditions" (Web search "calibercorner 6r15 movement")
Rolex 3285 is -2/+2 seconds per day as is pointed out elsewhere on that site.

A better understanding of ones watch can be had be buying a Timegrapher (others may bristle at this suggestion, but I would add), learning how to use it, and understanding what its readings indicate about a watch.

A better understanding of why a mechanical watch may vary from day to day can be had by reading "Tweaking the Mark XII" and specifically "The Concept of Timing" by Walt Odets.

(To those who are tempted, this has nothing to do with that other Odets article.)
 

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It will vary quite a bit depending on how you're wearing it, as the positional variance on these movements (whether the dial is facing up, or whether it's pointing to the side like when you hang your arm at your side) is rather large, and also will be affected by how long you wear it per day and thus how close the watch stays to fully wound. Most movements perform significantly better near a full wind, i.e. when you're wearing the watch 8 hours a day with reasonable amount of arm movement.
 

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It will vary quite a bit depending on how you're wearing it, as the positional variance on these movements (whether the dial is facing up, or whether it's pointing to the side like when you hang your arm at your side) is rather large, and also will be affected by how long you wear it per day and thus how close the watch stays to fully wound. Most movements perform significantly better near a full wind, i.e. when you're wearing the watch 8 hours a day with reasonable amount of arm movement.
Which is why, particularly with these affordable Seiko calibers, you really should give the watch a good solid handwind if the watch is starting empty. Sure, giving it a few shakes will be enough to get the watch going, but really nowhere near enough power to provide consistent timekeeping (atleast until a power reserve has been built up through automatic winding form wearing it for a few days).
 

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Which is why, particularly with these affordable Seiko calibers, you really should give the watch a good solid handwind if the watch is starting empty. Sure, giving it a few shakes will be enough to get the watch going, but really nowhere near enough power to provide consistent timekeeping (atleast until a power reserve has been built up through automatic winding form wearing it for a few days).
The only consistent Seikos I’ve had have been daily worn. They do make a good only watch once regulated, but outside that I wouldn’t try too hard getting them running too accurately.
 

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Rolex 3285 is -2/+2 seconds per day as is pointed out elsewhere on that site.
This is what they claim, reality is different, both for Seiko (usually better) than for Rolex (usually worse).

Just a quick update; the watch seems to have settled to around + 2.5 seconds per day.
Very happy so far

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No it´s a sh!tty Seiko, burn it with fire!!!
 

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You're spot on. Reality is different. My 055 PADI definitely has larger positional variance than the Squale I have with the ETA2824 (both after a good wind up) when resting in one position. But on wearing the Seiko, the positional changes cancel out and the timekeeping remains pretty much in sync with NRC / NIST time over the course of an 18 hour day.
 

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Which is why, particularly with these affordable Seiko calibers, you really should give the watch a good solid handwind if the watch is starting empty. Sure, giving it a few shakes will be enough to get the watch going, but really nowhere near enough power to provide consistent timekeeping (atleast until a power reserve has been built up through automatic winding form wearing it for a few days).
Indeed, in my 6r15 manual, Seiko even says this:

"If the watch is used without being wound up fully, gain or loss of the watch may result. To avoid this, wear the watch for more than 10 hours a day. If the watch is used without wearing on the wrist (if it is used on the desk like a clock, for example), be sure to wind it up fully every day at a fixed time."
 
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