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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Dear forum members~

I'm a newbie and English is not my mother tongue, so pardon my mistakes if any.

I recently bought a Seiko 7s36b watch SNZH57, which shows +42 sec/day :-( and needs to be regulated.


While I was staring at the regulator bar and several internet pics, I realized that 7s36b's regulator is

different from that of 7s26a or 7s36a.

7s26a / 7s36a
Watch Pocket watch Fashion accessory Analog watch Gear


7s36b
Data storage device Electronics Close-up Hard disk drive Technology



The hair spring guide on 7s36b regulator seems quite narrow as shown in the following (net-borrowed) magnified pics,


Product Fashion accessory Auto part Wheel Metal

Organism Metal

Water Metal Glass Macro photography


I was trying to regulate my watch myself, but began to worry.

Since it seems that 7s36b's regulator is much more sensitive(?) than 7s26a's traditional one,

a movement of regulator by tiny hair width could be amplified to result in minutes of change in timekeeping?

Worse than good old 7s26?


I thought 7s26b/7s36b are "improved" versions of 7s26a/7s26a having better accuracy set by Seiko factory QC.

If regulating of these "b" versions are more difficult than "a" versions, how's that possible? :-s


Anyhow, I'm about to regulate this "improved" 7s36b watch myself. :think:

Advices and experiences from any of you Gurus would be highly appreciated. ;-)


Thanks in advance.

Best regards,

golfer87
 

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I recently broomed up my Sumo's 6R15.

All I know is a small movement makes a big change.

I recommend using a dial caliper to make small adjustments and creep up on it.

It took me quite a few tries. I kept going either side of perfect. It's now running +2.5 seconds per day average for the last week. I'm happy with that.
 

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In my experience, the b models are no more difficult to regulate than the a models. As noted by Greg above, very small changes to the regulating lever do make large changes in the time keeping. You will want to make the smallest change you can and see were things end up. Good luck.
 

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If your watch is new from out of store or dealer stock, then I would wear it a month or so before trying to regulate it. Seiko Automatics can run a bit fast when brand new for three to six weeks before setteling down and running very accurately without adjustment.

Max
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
[Regulation Results]

I've visited a local watch shop for "professionally":) regulating my watch.

Since I bought the watch about 2 months ago, it's been maintained wound by using a watch winder and consistently showing +42 sec/day.

While the watch was checked with a timing machine facing up, the error was detected as +30 sec/day.

After the regulation, it's been 30 hours till now and the watch keeps +1 sec/30 h so far, fairly good.

Let me show you how much the regulator lever was moved to correct an error of about 30 sec/day.

Before
Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Metal Fashion accessory


After
Analog watch Watch Watch accessory Metal Fashion accessory

Indeed the regulator bar has been moved (let's say, in 100s of micromaters). :roll:

Actually, my local watchman went forward and backward resulting in a net movement of that much.

With a good loupe and a toothpick, one can do it, but I am happy with the settled nuisance for $10.


Zoom (Before & After)
Auto part Wheel Rim Electronics Metal >>>>>>>>> Electronics Auto part Metal Machine Rim


About the easiness or betterness of this regulator bar compared with that of "a" models,

I found an internet article by a Japanese Seiko collector, and he says that

this new regulator of "b" models has nothing to do with better factory regulation

but is merely for efficient assembly (which is a copy of what ETA did to their ETAchron).
 

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I must say, I am surprised the regulator had to be moved as much as the pics indicate. In my experience, if you can really see a movement of the regulator, you have probably gone too far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, it actually moved, I couldn't tell it by naked eye without the aid of a loupe though. :)

Anyhow the watch keeps quite accurate time so far.

And yes, the watch was regulated by using a timing machine (vibrograph with an LCD panel).

After a few adjustment, the timing machine displayed the calibration result of 0 ~ +1 sec/day.

Hope this helps people in regulating their watches.
 

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Yes, it actually moved, I couldn't tell it by naked eye without the aid of a loupe though. :)

Anyhow the watch keeps quite accurate time so far.

And yes, the watch was regulated by using a timing machine (vibrograph with an LCD panel).

After a few adjustment, the timing machine displayed the calibration result of 0 ~ +1 sec/day.

Hope this helps people in regulating their watches.
That's good as far as it goes, but the real test will be how it keeps time while you are wearing it ;-)

What with differences in activity level, positional variation, state of wind, etc. there will be significantly wider rate fluctuation than 0-1 s/d.

There can be a huge difference between rate on a winder and rate on the wrist.

HTH
 
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