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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got a couple off of the 'Bay earlier this month. Why, you ask? Because they spoke to me.

First is a month/day/ date Tremont with an Elbon movement. It's small, about the size of a prewar Omega.

Believe it or not, it all works, quick set buttons and all. I wound it and it's been keeping excellent time for the last 30 hours.

Does this qualify as a multi-complication movement or is this considered a single complication? Or none?

The photos are the sellers. I don't have the tools to remove the back.











The second is a 1957 Bulova. The dial has aged, but the numbers and hands are better than the photo's show.

Again, I wound it and it's been keeping excellent time for the last 30 hours.

Has anyone seen the US ZONE GERMANY stamp before? it's on the inside of the back cover.

The photos are the sellers. I don't have the tools to remove the back.









Yes, I will have them serviced before making them part of my wardrobe.

Thanks, all.
 

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Thanks for Posting. The US Zone in Germany was the southwest portion and it's odd to see that stamp on a watch from 1957 since the occupation officially ended in 1955. I guess they had a fair inventory of back plates at the factory.
I'm not an expert on complications but I'd say the Elbon would have 2 at least: day-month and day of month. Perhaps the Euro-experts could weigh in here.
 

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Hi -

The US Zone refers to the date of manufacture, not the date of sale; it would also refer to the manufacture of the case, and not to the movement. Hence it's not that surprising, but is fairly unusual, which is always nice. :)

Ray is right with the complications: day/month and date. This was particularly popular in the immediate post-war period, as it is one of the more useful complications that you can give the average businessman or office worker in the pre-computer, pre-PDA world. Previous to this era and the calibres involved, such a complication was reserved for rather high-end watches. After the war, there was quite a bit of excess capacity available in the watch industry, and moving this complication down into a more affordable zone was a good way of using that.

Consumers appreciated being able to acquire this useful complication and the relative success of this calibre type during this time period points to increasing wages and disposable income in the post-war period...

JohnF
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for the info, y'all.

JohnF- The useful complications aspect is exactly why I picked it up. I like the idea of month, day and date on my watch.

BTW- The Bulova has been running accurately for 42 hours now on a full wind. The other petered out right after my initial post.

Brian
 

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Thanks for the info, y'all.

JohnF- The useful complications aspect is exactly why I picked it up. I like the idea of month, day and date on my watch.

BTW- The Bulova has been running accurately for 42 hours now on a full wind. The other petered out right after my initial post.

Brian
Nice buys. I think the Tremont is a very interesting little watch. Date pointers are great conversation pieces - most people (I don't mean collectors; real people) have never seen one. And are those hinged lugs?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Howdy, Marrick.

No, they're not hinged lugs. Those are the quick set buttons for the month wheel and date hand. You pull the staff out, like you're going to set the time, and pudh the buttons and the hand or wheel will jump forward for you. It makes it nice and easy to set up right.

Brian
 
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