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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All

I've got a condition which means that I use sticks every day to get around, and will do so for the foreseeable future. I'm able to walk short distances (e.g. around the house) without using them, but it's just too tiring and too slow to go without for long periods of time.

I'm aware that mechanical watches are finely balanced pieces of machinery, and that they don't stand up well to shocks. Obviously that's a bit of a problem. The sort of impacts that the watch would be withstanding are fairly mild, but very regular (once every 1-2 seconds for minutes on end). Will stick use noticeably shorten the life of a regular mechanical watch? If so, can you name me a few impact resistant watches that aren't the G-shock or various Seiko calibres? Price isn't an issue because I'm just exploring at the moment

Thanks

Rosski
 

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Is your condition something a knee scooter would help with? They're all the rage for leg injuries these days...my wife and father both used them recently.

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Hmm. I suppose walking on crutches is bumpier than a regular healthy stride, but I really don't see that hurting a mechanical watch. The jolts might make the watch a little bit less accurate, but I doubt it would be a meaningful problem. I'm pretty confident that your watch would be fine.
 

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I have used crutches for a couple of weeks, all while wearing mechanical watches. It did not seem to negatively impact my watches at all. The Oris that I wore for much of that time is actually in for a service now (not because of abuse, just because it is at the age for a service). I will try to remember to report back if my watchmaker notes any special damage to it. I never noticed a change in accuracy though.

There are brands out there that are made to be more robust, notably some of the German brands. That may be something to consider. Something else to consider, if mechanical makes you nervous, is the high accuracy quartz market.
 

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The Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean claims shock resistance, they have a video on their site. I really want this watch myself:

OMEGA Watches: Shock resistance
 

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The sort of impacts that the watch would be withstanding are fairly mild, but very regular (once every 1-2 seconds for minutes on end). Will stick use noticeably shorten the life of a regular mechanical watch? If so, can you name me a few impact resistant watches that aren't the G-shock or various Seiko calibres? Price isn't an issue because I'm just exploring at the moment

Thanks

Rosski
How are you using your crutches that the watch will be sustaining small impacts every 1-2 seconds? I used crutches after a ACL surgery and walked on crutches for several weeks. I bumped my watch very rarely. Usually, your wrists are straight and you're moving your entire arm to position the crutches forward. Perhaps if your watch is on a very loose bracelet it could swing about and smack into the crutch itself but if that's the case, just size the bracelet to fit more tightly on the wrist.

From my experience on crutches, I didn't have any negative issues affecting the performance of my watches.
 

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How are you using your crutches that the watch will be sustaining small impacts every 1-2 seconds? I used crutches after a ACL surgery and walked on crutches for several weeks.
I'm thinking he is talking about the Cuff Crutches, a totally different experience from under arm ones. Under arms you lift your body using leverage, hence little impact, while cuff crutches impact as you rest your weight on them every step.

Cuff:
In-Motion Pro Forearm Crutches | ColonialMedical.com

Under Arm:
Walk Easy model 611 - Youth underarm crutches, color
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What I mean is that the shock may travel up my arm, and since I wear my watches tight to my wrist I'm worried that it may throw off the more sensitive parts. I've worn quartz watches for years with no ill effects, but that;s to be expected. The watch doesn't actually collide with anything
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm thinking he is talking about the Cuff Crutches, a totally different experience from under arm ones. Under arms you lift your body using leverage, hence little impact, while cuff crutches impact as you rest your weight on them every step.

You're right, Seth. For long term users, cuff (or Canadian) crutches are a much more viable prospect. As you said, I put most of my weight on my sticks, and since my left leg is weaker, the strain is more on the wrist that holds my watch.
 

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I think any modern mechanical would have decent enough shock protection to serve you well, but why not take this opportunity to get a beautiful Explorer II and then you get Rolex' new Paraflex shock protection system!

 

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I'd be more worried about banging the case against A metal crutch...if that's not an issue the you're Good IMHO


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Is your condition something a knee scooter would help with? They're all the rage for leg injuries these days...my wife and father both used them recently.

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I HATE those things! I see so many people a few weeks into using them for spasms and muscle aches due to the imbalance and stress it puts on the body.

Unless you're really pounding away at the crutches or somehow your watch is hitting them you'll be fine.
 

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I HATE those things! I see so many people a few weeks into using them for spasms and muscle aches due to the imbalance and stress it puts on the body.

Unless you're really pounding away at the crutches or somehow your watch is hitting them you'll be fine.
I'm sure there are pros and cons, just like anything else.

After my Dad fell using his crutches, it was a good solution for him. Got him out of bed and allowed him to be out-and-about in the neighborhood.

And my wife lacked the strength to use crutches all day at work, so the easy mobility was a huge plus for her.


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I do quite like the Explorer II, and your suggestion. The only issue is that I don't think I could ever shake the feeling that a Rolex is 'above my station.' I think that's why Omegas are arguably more popular, because they're not (as) associated with conspicuous consumption and status symbolism...

I can't find any conclusive evidence that the Paraflex is superior to any other shock system. I'm beginning to think in order to satisfy the passion, I may just have to wear a quartz every day and have two or three very good mechanical watches to wear when I feel like it. This will help me quite a bit in making my decisions. I'll probably be boring and go Omega, Zenith and NOMOS. Watch this space...
 

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I'm sure there are pros and cons, just like anything else.

After my Dad fell using his crutches, it was a good solution for him. Got him out of bed and allowed him to be out-and-about in the neighborhood.

And my wife lacked the strength to use crutches all day at work, so the easy mobility was a huge plus for her.


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I guess I should've used a smiley in that case. Usually when I do all caps it's a bit tongue in cheek. Though I have had many a people who would have issues due to the load shift with the scooter.
 

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I love the, "Buy a Rolex Solution". You are on crutches - Buy a Rolex, you use a cane - Buy a Rolex, you have constant headaches - Buy a Rolex, constipation... Buy a Rolex. Now it can even be an acronym: Got a hang nail - BAR (Buy a Rolex). Obviously, it is the answer to everything in the universe! Wow, I have just stumbled upon a great theorem. I feel like an Einstein or a Hawking...
 
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If you plan on knocking a wall down with your crutch I would take the watch off but for everyday crutch use it should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What about things like unusual wear on the movement due to friction or the fact that it's upside-down most of the time?
 

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What about things like unusual wear on the movement due to friction or the fact that it's upside-down most of the time?

Several years ago I shattered my lower leg in a motorcycle accident. I still remember looking at my boot and saying to myself "hey, vibram soles". Couldn't see the top of my boot, only the bottom... It was facing upward literally like a V . Anyway, bed ridden for months withstanding several surgeries, graduating to crutches (5 months) and finally a cane (about 4 years). This included powerwalking for several hours per night, using the cane with my left (watch wearing) hand. Must have worn out at least twenty rubber cane stoppers during this period. All the while wearing my trust submariner. The watch is still with me, working fine and hasn't needed a service - keeps good time.

My point is this, the majority of mechanical watches can withstand this use with no problem.
 
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