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I ordered one as well. I had an AA-battery powered clock in the kitchen for convenience and it's dying so I'll replace it with this one. Bought it off Amazon. Certainly all of my average, reasonably well informed friends will see it and be impressed that I have a genuine Rolex plastic clock in my kitchen.

You know, I don't blame Rolex for defending their trademark. I hold a couple U.S. patents with a couple more pending - so I "get" intellectual property. But I think there are certainly less obnoxious ways they could have gone about it. Also their statement that the average, reasonably well informed consumer would likely call the Rolex line of watches to mind when looking at the Oyster & Pop logo is so preposterous that they should be charged with perjury should they ever dare to utter it under oath.
We’re on the same page! It’s not so much the ‘what’, rather the ‘how’ that leaves a bad taste.
 

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How loudly does it tick? I'd be interested if it's reasonably quiet.
It sweeps, so there’s no annoying ticking at all. That was a big winner.
 

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This was discussed ad nauseum on the Rolex Forums.
I’m sure the glitterati over on TRF were apoplectic at the thought some upstart would use their word!
 

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I know there are other threads about this but I am happy there’s another one :). The more folks in the watch enthusiast community that know about this, the better. Such a jerk move.
Much to the shock of the Thread Police it is actually not illegal to have threads, even multiple threads, on the same topic.
 

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I ordered one as well. I had an AA-battery powered clock in the kitchen for convenience and it's dying so I'll replace it with this one. Bought it off Amazon. Certainly all of my average, reasonably well informed friends will see it and be impressed that I have a genuine Rolex plastic clock in my kitchen.

You know, I don't blame Rolex for defending their trademark. I hold a couple U.S. patents with a couple more pending - so I "get" intellectual property. But I think there are certainly less obnoxious ways they could have gone about it. Also their statement that the average, reasonably well informed consumer would likely call the Rolex line of watches to mind when looking at the Oyster & Pop logo is so preposterous that they should be charged with perjury should they ever dare to utter it under oath.
What could be less obnoxious than sending a private notice to the company? You say you don't blame Rolex, yet you blame Rolex. You say you get IP but it seems like you don't understand TM law. If you understand TM law, then you would know that Rolex had no choice but to defend the TM, otherwise they wouldn't be able to prevent knockoffs from using the Oyster name on their watches. Any brand would have had to do the same thing, whether they like it or not.

The only reason this case seems obnoxious is because the clock company chose to rely on the ignorant court of public opinion for sympathy, by publicizing the situation. After all, they didn't have to talk to the press, right? I find them to be a bit disingenuous in playing the victim, given that their legal counsel would have explained the TM law to them.
 

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^ This. You either defend your rights and marks or you don't - its not possible to let some people get away with it and not others as you set precedent with your actions.

I completely empathise with Oyster & Pop - I built my company from the ground up as well, but as a matter of course whenever we are creating a logo / branding / campaign or whatever, we have a procedural obligation to our clients as well as ourselves to have our output checked for IP infringement in market before what we have produced goes live.

(I have also bought 2 clocks from Oyster and Pop - they are great for kids bedrooms.)
 

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Frankly, I don't understand the outrage towards Rolex. Apparently, the Swiss have had various names and terms protected for use as trademarks on watches and wristwatches. So the fault here clearly lies with the company "Oyster & Pop", who obviously didn't bother to find out if the term "Oyster" is already protected.
If I start building cars tomorrow and call my company "A1 Quattro", the day after tomorrow the legal department of Audi AG will knock on my door and more or less kindly ask me to come up with another brand name – and rightly so.
 
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Frankly, I don't understand the outrage towards Rolex. Apparently, the Swiss have had various names and terms protected for use as trademarks on watches and wristwatches. So the fault here clearly lies with the company "Oyster & Pop", who obviously didn't bother to find out if the term "Oyster" is already protected.
If I start building cars tomorrow and call my company "A1 Quattro", the day after tomorrow the legal department of Audi AG will knock on my door and more or less kindly ask me to come up with another brand name – and rightly so.
Did you name your car company "A1 Quattro" after your hometown?

Oyster & Pop is selling a clever children's learning tool. Rolex is selling overpriced fashion watches to tools. Big difference.
 

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Did you name your car company "A1 Quattro" after your hometown?
Uninteresting, because the naming rights for both "A1" and "Quattro" when used for automobiles are held by Audi AG. So the name of my location or hometown can be whatever it wants, I am not allowed to call my company "A1 Quattro".
A few kilometers away from where I live, there is a village called "Glashütte". This Glashütte has nothing to do with the town of Glashütte in Saxony and is located about 700 km southwest of the famous watchmaking town. I could easily start a business here in "my" Glashütte and, for example, sell watches made on my behalf according to the Steinhart model. But if I had "Glashütte" printed on the dials, I would have a problem, because everyone from A.Lange & Söhne to Union Glashütte would sue me for misuse of the "Glashütte" brand – never mind that my company is located in Glashütte in the Black Forest and the imprint would even be correct.

Oyster & Pop is selling a clever children's learning tool. Rolex is selling overpriced fashion watches to tools. Big difference.
Also completely irrelevant. Rolex has obviously secured the name "Oyster" for clocks and wristwatches, which means that "Oyster & Pop" violate trademark law by using it. Legally, Rolex is on the safe side. Whether the Geneva-based company could have turned a blind eye is another matter. However, one must then also ask the question of how far this then goes at some point. Should Rolex also keep its head down if the watches from, for example, San Martin then eventually carry "Oyster Perpetual" or "Datejust" on the dial?


Edit:
For Rolex, there is also the problem that they MUST defend their trademark right, otherwise they may lose the rights to it. That should perhaps be kept in mind despite all the indignation.
 
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