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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This year, so far, is being rather horrible for just about everything and everyone. Novelties on the watch market seem to not have been affected all that much, though. Sure, watch fairs were cancelled, but scores of nice, new models have been released anyway.

When I had a look at the brand new Certina catalogue before the official premieres of some of the new models, I was quite astounded to see this gorgeous thing:
The New Certina DS Chronograph Automatic


Photo from the article in link. Filched for academic purposes.

Certina has - apparently - provided a photo of the inspiration behind a watch, supposedly something they have made in the 1940s:


Nice watch, no? So, what's the problem here? Well, the problem is this: it is highly likely that the watch is a redial or a franken. Or, worse, both.

Now, why so?

Let's have a closer look...


The first and most obvious red flag is the fact, that while the dial has lume plots on it, the hands don't, and were never meant to. While the crime of using a combination of a non-lumed dial and non-lumed hands has been committed in the past by many - and is still being committed now by some of the great names in the watch industry - I'm pretty confident that a travesty like a lumed dial and non-lumed hands is far too idiotic to have actually been a thing, ever.

Second, let us focus on the claim of the "original" watch being from the 1940s. Well...


THAT FONT?! IN THE 1940S? A TIGER, IN AFRICA? REALLY?!

By Jove.

I don't know what that thing is, it's a nice-looking thing for sure, but it's a travesty worthy of the long-gone VintageCaliber, some accursed horological dumpster along the lines of Wannabuyawatch, or perhaps would fit just fine in a "The Best of Hodinkee Shop" compilation.

What could this be? A late 1950s/early 1960s piece in a 1940s style, along the lines of the ones that Certina equipped with the Excelsior Park movements? A piece that does date to the 1940s, but has been equipped with a later service dial and was given an incorrect handset? Or maybe all except the dial is OK? For what it's worth, could well be a redial.

If this is what I think it is, I'm really disappointed with Certina. The "reissue" is nice, and with its finishing and specifications, it really seems like a very appealing watch. Alas, whoever let that "original" be used as inspiration has failed, and quite miserably at that.
 

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mkws...Hello!

To my eye, the new Certina is a fine-looking watch, and the Company is to be commended for offering it. From what I can tell, it's a very tough sellers market out there, and I can only assume that the last several months have brought real misery to many a Manufacturer.

Within this context, then, let's be as generous as possible, and allow these Companies to do as best they can. With just a bit of luck-- and plenty of hard work--many of them will emerge intact, eager to move back productively into the marketplace.

And: although this Certina is beyond my means, I'd grab one in a Second should The Lottery smile upon me!

Michael.
 

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If you are talking about the vintage watch that certina used as a reference for the new one. That might be that it was the only example certina could find. I cannot think Certina was cranking out many of these back in the day.
Have you ever seen the watch that inspired the current Big Eye chrono? It was sad looking well used watch that came into Longines possession by chance. They don’t even have a lot of info about it. But they took the ball and ran with it
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I even doubt Certina even made these themselves. A few Certina with Venus 188 from the 50s come up now and then and the EP40 from the 60s are more in abundance but I can't say I know much about these models.
I left a comment in the article about the watch at Monochrome (link in OP) - the author has forwarded my comment to Certina, and Certina responded. Their response was quite Pythian:




Reading between the lines, this is a service dial, made way later than the watch itself. I have never seen any evidence to support the existence of that font in the 1940s. It's also hard to say what they mean by "transition period."

Through saying that the movement was made by Jeanneret-Brehm, they obviously mean Excelsior Park:



Given the two-register layout, I'm guessing there's an EP4 inside.
 
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So, to put it into plain language: "We, errr, got it totally wrong. But the guys and gals in Marketing say we need a new model to hook in vintage fans who value newness over authenticity."

Sigh.
 

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Excellent catch Mike..!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So, to put it into plain language: "We, errr, got it totally wrong. But the guys and gals in Marketing say we need a new model to hook in vintage fans who value newness over authenticity."

Sigh.
Yeah. On a positive side, they didn't go into a full incommunicado or deny everything. Sure, their response was - as I've said - Pythian and full of PR talk, but as far as the standards seem to go for big-time brands belonging to major holdings, it seems decent. OK, a lot of working their way around saying anything directly, but no less, the relevant information is there.

PS Nice to see you back and still angry, mkws! You've been missed by all.
Had a lot of work to do; at times I was just in no shape or mood to go crusading.

Excellent catch Mike..!!
Thanks, Eddie!
 
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