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Great thread! I have learned quite a bit about establishing defined parameters in making purchasing decisions to build a collection. I also appreciate the reality of maintaining "rotator" pieces to allow some flexibility in the process to evaluate "potential" keepers. You have a wonderful collection that is to be admired. Sorry to hear that you have parted with your GF, especially since she shared your appreciation for fine watches. However, at least your watches are safe from further damage and wear. I guess you can consider past and future GF's in the "rotator" column.

I see that we are both in Seattle. I live on Lower QA. It would be nice to meet and discuss watches at some point. Feel free to shoot me a private message if you are interested. Also, I am in the process of acquiring a PAM Radiomir 512 shortly and appreciate your earlier comments on the model.
 

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Love reading your strategy. I am not sure I concur with your definition of iconic - after all, aren't icons simply the winners of popularity contests?
I wouldn't get held up on it. One or two or three is fine and dandy I suppose - but I wouldn't feel pressure in having your whole collection be 'iconic'.

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Discussion Starter #64
Man oh man... a lot has happened since I last gave an update around these parts! Expect a few posts coming to catalog my journey (spoiler alert, My sig is current state). To set a baseline, here is where I was at when I last updated

New Methodology (New Rules are Underlined)

  • 2 watches for each category - Dress, Casual, and Sport for a total of 6 core collection. I wear all 3 types with regularity so they are all a necessity (as much as any luxury item is a necessity...).
  • 3 light color faces, 3 dark color faces.
    [*]Each watch must be considered iconic and classic design (or as close to it as possible) to help them age gracefully and be perennially beautiful.
    [*]In each category, the two watches must present different wearing experiences (subjective, yes, but I'm the judge, jury and executioner here) to offer as much versatility as possible.
  • In each category, I will have one "High" and one "Low" model for maximum flexibility of wearing. Really all mechanical watches are high end but I'd like to have a slightly more affordable option and a slightly more upscale option in each bucket when necessary.
  • I will *attempt* to limit the representation of each brand to a maximum of one watch.
  • I will *attempt* to limit specific complications to be represented once in the collection.
  • I'm allowed 2 Rotators that will follow the 1-in-1-out rule (I have a wandering eye and I need an outlet). The rotators do not need to conform to any of the above restrictions, they're just passing fancies.
SOTC_1503105790220 (1).jpg

Act 1: Debate between the Tudor and Doxa
My last post on here welcomed the arrival of the Tudor Chrono 79260 (the poor man's 6263) and the Doxa Sub 50th anniversary model. Serendipitously, these two were on my shortlist for the Low/Sport slot due to their robustness and difference from my collection at the time. Both the Doxa, having the Cousteau connection, and the Tudor, using parts from famous Daytona’s, loosely fit my iconic requirement so it was on!

The Doxa
The Good
The Doxa wears big and bold, it's hard not to with the 70's feel of the case shape and blaze orange dial. I usually liken it to an English bulldog: it looks like nothing else, it's very ugly but also charming in it's own way. It was clearly purpose built, and I really like that aspect of it. Overall, I think that Doxa did a great job being faithful to the original and that is what drew me to it. The much smaller dial along with the bubble sapphire make it look very much like the original. As a semi-avid diver myself, I liked the idea of having a true dive watch in the core group and, despite its size, the Doxa is supremely comfortable on the wrist.
Capturedsafdf.JPG
The Bad
Man oh man, the bad on the Doxa has been enough to make me swear off the brand in the future. At first, I was really loving it but I began to notice that my dial was slightly different than others that I saw in that mine was missing the lume plot next to the day aperture. While not a gigantic issue, it was curious enough for me to open a thread in the Doxa forum (https://www.watchuseek.com/f34/doxa-300-50th-anniversary-question-4575121.html) and the company eventually reached out to me in mid November 19th, 2017 asking for more images. I sent over some pictures and, as bad luck would have it, my bracelet broke shortly after sending those images. A rivet popped out of the clasp (while washing my hair of all things), making it unwearable, and on November 27th I emailed asking for some help in remedying my bracelet. Suddenly, it was crickets. I followed up with a PMs here and emails until finally in January I got a response. After a little back and forth, they agreed to let me send in my bracelet as it broke under warranty, and the bracelet was sent the beginning of February for repair. I followed up multiple times, with weeks between responses and always got the same answer - we'll check into it and get back to you, but they never actually got back to me (https://www.watchuseek.com/f34/black-lung-poseidon-edition-question-4666727-3.html#post45654169). My bracelet finally showed up in the beginning of May, well, not my bracelet. It was a brand new bracelet, unsized, along with one correct endlink and one incorrect endlink...o| I had to wait 3 months for Doxa to send me an incorrect, unsized replacement bracelet (5 months if you count from my first request for help). I still haven't received a correct endlink and got one apology email with no real follow up.

The Tudor
The Good
The Tudor is a pretty wonderful little watch. Mine has a Rolex case and crown and the 72960 is the little block, with the case being much more like the actual Daytona case than the Big Block case known for the Tudors. As such, it wears a bit thinner on the wrist despite not being much smaller at all. The dial is charming in the same way that a 6263 is, with almost identical font and hands. The silver sunburst is very nice, and the cyclops magnifier is much larger and more helpful than a typical Rolex cyclops. It is a very nice watch to wear and to look at, although actually reading the time is tough.
pushersout.JPG
The Bad
While not entirely bad, the Tudor isn't a classic in and of itself. It relies on the visual nods to the Rolex Daytona to really have an identity. Additionally, This is one of the hardest dials I've ever seen to read in less than perfect light. The hands and subdials tent to blur together, resulting in a watch that takes a second or two to read in nearly every time, every occasion. Finally, while not bad about the watch, I am trying to avoid duplication of complications in my collection and while I love Chronos there is no way that this displaces the FOIS in my collection.

The Winner?
I haven't actually called this contest yet but, despite the utter distaste I now hold for Doxa as a modern company, and the fact that it's a less versatile watch, I think the Doxa Sub fit my collecting methodology better than the Tudor. I almost want to rid myself of the Doxa simply because I've been so disappointed with the poor customer service but I'd be at a loss for what to replace it with... Recommendations are welcome but I'm leaning towards a true dive watch.

Additional Acts to come...
 

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Man oh man... a lot has happened since I last gave an update around these parts! Expect a few posts coming to catalog my journey (spoiler alert, My sig is current state). To set a baseline, here is where I was at when I last updated...
Recommendations are welcome but I'm leaning towards a true dive watch.

Additional Acts to come...
What about an Oris Divers 65 or Rado Captain Cook to replace the annoying Doxa? Or a Fifty Fathoms?
 

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Discussion Starter #66 (Edited)
Wow, nearly 2 years since an update here… Where to begin? Firstly, I’ve entirely fallen off the wagon on my ‘Road to Eight’ but I am hoping to right the ship at some point in 2020/2021. I’ve been fortunate enough to find some amazing watches that have been delightful to own and, in owning, have also shown me that I don’t need to own them.

I won’t bore anyone with all the ins and outs over the last 2 years but trust me when I say I’ve seen a few go through my hands but will touch on a few that remained in the collection.

The High-End Dress watch

Breguet 3237: What is there to say about this Breguet? I’ve been a fan of the brand and styling for quite a long time and at some point I stumbled across the article about great Dress Chronographs like the Patek 5070 which put the Vacheron Constantin 47101 on my radar. It has the famed Lemania base caliber as so many lauded chronos, is hand finished to an exceptional standard and is within my crazy-but-realistic personal budget range. If doing my research I stumbled across an even lesser known rival – the Breguet 3237. Made at a time from when Daniel Roth was reinventing the brand, thoroughly handmade and hand finished, the chrono wears boldly for a 36mm watch.

I was getting ready to send my Lange away for service as it was running dramatically fast and was not keen on the idea of not having a gold dress watch for multiple months. To my surprise, an early Breguet 3237 came up for sale at a price that wasn’t outrageous and I thought it might be fun to wear while my Lange went in and then sell it after the Lange returned and be virtually neutral in cost of ownership. It wears exceptionally well and I’ll admit that I actually prefer the reverse view of the Breguet to that of the Lange. It’s exceedingly formal and feels of a bygone era.


A Lange & Sohne 1815 Up/Down: It may be evident from the above but the Lange had a real run for its money when it returned from service. Over the 3 months it was away in Germany I bonded deeply with the Breguet. I loved the delicate hands and the patina of 40 year old gold. I love the chronograph function and the movement and while I tried to put the Lange back into the box I found myself consistently reaching for the Breguet over the Lange. I thought this might just be a honeymoon period but, 6 months after getting the Lange back, I’d worn it only a handful of times and each time I wished I’d worn the Breguet and so its fate was sealed… I sold the Lange and settled on the Breguet 3237 as my High End Dress Watch.
 

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Interesting, but if it were me, I wold have kept the L&S, as chronos just don't fit into what I would wear as a dress watch--that's me, of course--enjoy yours.
 

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Welcome back, MZ! It’s been awhile. Back in the day I really enjoyed this thread taking us along for the ride while you were trying to figure it out. I also have to give you props for general categories. I borrowed your architecture a bit in helping myself delineate my collection.
 

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Discussion Starter #69
Welcome back, MZ! It’s been awhile. Back in the day I really enjoyed this thread taking us along for the ride while you were trying to figure it out. I also have to give you props for general categories. I borrowed your architecture a bit in helping myself delineate my collection.
Thank you! I'll be adding my updates here in pieces but Quarantine has given me no excuse to delay any longer. Would love to hear your journey as well! You're welcome to post it here or start another thread to catalog your journey and unique philosophy.
 
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