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I was wondering the same thing
I have now reached greatness!

Or you have. Or we're both screwed.

Hi, old friend. Hope you are well. I think I owe you an email from, like, two years ago. Mea culpa.

Back to the watches and my hermit-ism!



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I have now reached greatness!

Or you have. Or we're both screwed.

Hi, old friend. Hope you are well. I think I owe you an email from, like, two years ago. Mea culpa.

Back to the watches and my hermit-ism!



Sent from my PH-1 using Tapatalk
No worries, Mark. I don't remember what we might have been talking about, nor would I be offended if someone never got back to me. I assume it was about linking up for drinks next time you're in the neighborhood, and if so, as always, let me know when you're coming, and if I can get the kitchen pass, I'll meet up with you.
 
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The gears are not rough. When viewed with the naked eye or 10x magnification they appear quite polished. These photos were taken at 100x to 200x magnification, so every imperfection shows up. Also the important surfaces are highly polished and precisely machined.

Check out this example, the gear teeth are slick and smooth. This is 230x magnification. The gear is 5.2mm diameter and .10mm thick. That's .20 inches x .0039 inches. A human hair is 2-6 thousands of an inch thick. Expressed in decimal that is .002-.006 inch. So this gear is as thick as the average human hair thickness, .0039 or 3.9 thousands of an inch.

View attachment 12798899
Got to give this a like - it just reaffirms why we love mechanical watches and why my fingers and thumbs will always mangle any delicate combination of gears, springs and levers they touch.
 

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Assuming neither's performance could be forcibly improved through further regulation or adjustment, and both had similar performance in other positions, would you rather have one's performance or the other, and if so, why?
For me, I think it'd be the 9015, simply because it's "consistently inconsistent". Therefore, it would make it easier to track and know approximately how far off my watch would be at any time, and not have to worry about how charged it is.
 

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For me, I think it'd be the 9015, simply because it's "consistently inconsistent". Therefore, it would make it easier to track and know approximately how far off my watch would be at any time, and not have to worry about how charged it is.
I would tend to agree, although I think that downplays the benefit of the consistency a bit.

I was thinking about it as if it were fuel efficiency in a car. Let's say Car A gets 23 mpg on the highway, and 17 mpg in the city. If you're spending half your time in either place, you'd average 20 mpg.

If Car B gets 20 mpg no matter where you are, it seems like we'd end up trying to scrutinize our driving habits more, in order to know which car to buy.

But if you already owned the car, the one that gets 20 mpg no matter where you go at least relieves you from having to think about it, or worry about it, whereas the one that varies with conditions might lead you to change your habits, or otherwise might lead to lower satisfaction in ownership.

I actually have almost exactly this real-life experience. My wife's SUV has a real-time fuel economy gauge which also shows a lifetime average. It's supposed to get 17 mpg / 23 mpg, but we bought the car new, and in 12 years, it's averaged just 15-15.5 mpg, which really pisses me off (at the car, but also, my wife, when I think about how many times I told her to use premium gas for better mileage, and she told me she was using low octane because it was cheaper).

Not only were the manufacturer's fuel economy ratings grossly inflated (I think - who knows what the economy would have been if she'd used higher octane?), but it's also clear that most of her driving has been done under the least ideal conditions, so even if the ratings were correct, we wouldn't have anywhere near the 20 mpg average, just like you'd never get the Miyota's average +6/+7 accuracy from the "more accurate" STP if you were always running it at low power.

I think this is part of the reason I don't like power reserve indicators on a watch. I know I'd feel compelled to keep the watch fully powered at all times, even though I'm really not all that concerned with accuracy. I know I'd end up handing-winding the watch more frequently, rather than just wearing it and not worrying about it.
 

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(at the car, but also, my wife, when I think about how many times I told her to use premium gas for better mileage, and she told me she was using low octane because it was cheaper).

Not only were the manufacturer's fuel economy ratings grossly inflated (I think - who knows what the economy would have been if she'd used higher octane?), but it's also clear that most of her driving has been done under the least ideal conditions, so even if the ratings were correct, we wouldn't have anywhere near the 20 mpg average, just like you'd never get the Miyota's average +6/+7 accuracy from the "more accurate" STP if you were always running it at low power.

Why would you expect better fuel economy from higher octane gas? And even if higher octane gas DID improve fuel economy (it shouldn't) the higher cost-per-gallon would negate the benefits of greater economy. Indeed, as a driver of a turbocharged car (and thus compelled to use high octane gas) I can tell you that you'll spend more for a tank of premium fuel than you'd save with the additional range.



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Why would you expect better fuel economy from higher octane gas? And even if higher octane gas DID improve fuel economy (it shouldn't) the higher cost-per-gallon would negate the benefits of greater economy. Indeed, as a driver of a turbocharged car (and thus compelled to use high octane gas) I can tell you that you'll spend more for a tank of premium fuel than you'd save with the additional range.



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I'm not an automotive expert, but my understanding is that higher octane gas does improve fuel economy.

I'm also not a mathematician or scientist, but in order to know if the added cost of higher octane gas would be offset by better fuel economy, I reckon we'd need to actually try it with the car in question, and make the necessary calculations, especially as fuel costs vary with location, and, as the saying goes, "your mileage may vary".
 

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I have one automatic, a 72 Tissot with the 2571 day/date movement. I have only had it back from service a week or two, and am wearing it a lot more than I expected to. Possibly due to wanting to keep manual day/date changing to a minimum. :D
The service cost me $250 AUD (~US$200), and he changed the crown, seal and plexiglass. The watchmaker is semi retired so it took a while and he is an hour drive away, but I find him more personable than the guy much closer to home (who incidentally wanted $650 to do the same job 5 years ago).

Anyway, when I picked up the watch he went through a few things including the quick change date “use it but don’t play with it”.
He also advised me that if I hadn’t worn it for a day to “give it 3 or 4 winds” before putting it on. He gave a little demo and then handed it to me so I could feel the resistance at the point to stop manual winding.
i guess now this is to get the watch up into the more accurate power reserve area.

May only other experience with an auto was my Dad with his old Seiko, which was a non wind.
 
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Opinions vary on how much to hand wind an autowinding movement. And it'll vary by the movement. ETA 2824, for example, have a rep for a fragile keyless works so a common advice is to give it a few winds to get it going then let the autowind keep it wound.

All that probably doesn't help. If I were you, I'd follow your watchsmith's advice. Enjoy your watch.
 
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