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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently purchased a Breitling Super Ocean Steelfish while on vacation. Since I have been wearing it lately I notice it keeps losing time. I did synchro it with my phone clock and every day it is losing about 4-5 seconds. So at this rate in about 2 weeks it will be one minute behind, in a year it would be about a half hour behind. This doesn't seem right to me, I understand that self winders are not quite as accurate as a battery powered watch in some cases, but this just seems like it is too far off. I am just wondering if this is common. I thought they were accurate to about 2-3 minutes a year or better.

The watch was purchased from an authorized dealer, I have the chrono. certification papers and everything. Is this something I need to send back to Breitling? Also, is the movement supposed to be smooth like a Rolex or choppy? Mine is choppy, very fast movements. I hate to think I paid over 2 grand for a piece of crap! The watch is only 3 weeks old and already it is driving me nuts that it loses time this much. My old throw down Wittnauer kept perfect time up until the daylight savings switch, when it was automatically an hour off...lol.

Anything you guys can say here to help is much appreciated. :thanks
 

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4-5 seconds a day isn't terrible, but you could get it regulated if it bothers you that much. I personally would be pretty happy with 5 seconds, and would check the time once a week.
 

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4-5 seconds a day isn't terrible, but you could get it regulated if it bothers you that much. I personally would be pretty happy with 5 seconds, and would check the time once a week.

You are running within COSC specs.

However it should run soothly, of course it may depend on how you define choppy. It is hard to believe that there is a problem if it is running within spec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, just wasn't sure, this is my first automatic watch and I thought they were more accurate than that. Thanks for the prompt responses. I guess I will just learn to live with it. What I meant by choppy is actually very small start-stop movements, probably about 4 per second. I guess I'm just too picky to own one of these, ok I'll :-x
 

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Ok, just wasn't sure, this is my first automatic watch and I thought they were more accurate than that. Thanks for the prompt responses. I guess I will just learn to live with it. What I meant by choppy is actually very small start-stop movements, probably about 4 per second. I guess I'm just too picky to own one of these, ok I'll :-x
The choppiness you're describing sounds like it is alot less than a quartz movement. I would guess that what you are seeing is due to gear movement. If this bothers you, you must go positively nuts with quartz movements.


I think you will find that the Breitling auto will be a dependable solid performer, but it is subject to the vagaries of anything mechanical. If what you need is hyperaccuracy you should have gotten one of the Breitling Superquartz models.
 

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The choppiness you're describing sounds like it is alot less than a quartz movement. I would guess that what you are seeing is due to gear movement. If this bothers you, you must go positively nuts with quartz movements.
What he said. Mechanical movements consist of start-stop movements exactly like quartz movements, except they are more frequent and smaller. You won't find a true smooth movement like those high-school electric clocks... I think the Superocean uses a 28,800 bph ETA movement which is basically 8 beats per second, you are probably seeing movement on every other beat, hence your 4 ticks per second.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks a lot once again guys. I'm learning a lot here. I'm not out for super accuracy, just thought that they would be better for the prices you pay for them. Expecially since my beforementioned Wittnauer, battery driven, would only lose a couple seconds every few months. I guess you are really paying for the overall quality of the piece and in some cases a name.
 

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Hello SteelFish07,

So you have jumped in with both feet, congratulations on the purchase of a superlative time piece. The notion that a mechanical watch will perform to within .01 of a second per day accuracy is desirable but beyond the pocket of most normal men.
On the numbers...
Your watch beats 4 times per second or 8 back an forth motions of the pallet fork releasing energy into the gear train powering the hands. This is the "stop start" you observe of the centre second hand. Thats why it takes 42 hours for your watch to wind down if left motionless. The gear train is fed the power stored in the main spring bit by tiny bit regulated by the stop start of the pallet fork and balance wheel.
Taking the numbers a bit further you will see that that tiny pallet fork is in motion quite a bit.... 8 x60x60x24=~691,200 oscillations per day or 4,838,400 per week or 252,460,800 times per year. That is a fair few exacting motions for one little pallet fork to perform exactly each second of the day over the life time of a watch which may be a 100 years and usually much more.

So a movement looses 4 seconds per day or 32 beats. That's 32/691,200 = 0.00462% loss per day or the movement maintains an accuracy of 99.99538% against all physical forces experienced by the movement during its normal daily activity riding along on your arm. Where has your arm been today? Golfing, wind surfing, motorcycle riding, pitching a game of baseball, diving, dirt cycling, hammering a few dozen nails in the shed, a bit of chainsaw work ....you get my drift. The movement has to compensate for all of those inputs and still deliver a very close approximation of the real elapsed time since you last looked at your watch. It does, to within 99.99538% which is pretty damn close to perfect for a mechanical assembly. Oh and we haven't even touched on aspects like temperature and pressure variation along with magnetic and electrical forces that are encountered in the every day environment.

In six months, .5% of 100 years, look back on the performance of your watch and see if it isn't, on average, keeping to with in the specifications. COSC chronometer certification allows for a varation of -4 to +6 seconds per day. If it is consistent, and holding to a set variation say -3, you have a time keeper, not just a watch. A predictable time keeper that will tell you the time to within a few seconds day in and day out.

A good source of information...

http://www.cosc.ch/methode.php?lang=en

Thanks for posting. I hope you are having a great start to the new year!!
 

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thanks a lot once again guys. I'm learning a lot here. I'm not out for super accuracy, just thought that they would be better for the prices you pay for them. Expecially since my beforementioned Wittnauer, battery driven, would only lose a couple seconds every few months. I guess you are really paying for the overall quality of the piece and in some cases a name.
Am surprised you entertained the idea of a mechanical watch, really (good thing you're not looking at Patek Philippe :)). It sounds to me like a cheaper quartz would suit you better and give you the accuracy you need, as no mechanical watch will ever do that year in, year out.

If you like the quality of Breitling, the Colt is available with a very accurate quartz movement. Otherwise, consider Hamilton or Seiko quartzes.
 

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Congrats on the watch :-! Pics?
You're lucky, mine would go 5 minutes fast in a weeks time! I debated sending it in to be regulated but waited for it to "settle down". I think it has (haven't checked it yet) after about a year and a half!!!:think:
 

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Hello SteelFish07,

So you have jumped in with both feet, congratulations on the purchase of a superlative time piece. The notion that a mechanical watch will perform to within .01 of a second per day accuracy is desirable but beyond the pocket of most normal men.
On the numbers...
Your watch beats 4 times per second or 8 back an forth motions of the pallet fork releasing energy into the gear train powering the hands. This is the "stop start" you observe of the centre second hand. Thats why it takes 42 hours for your watch to wind down if left motionless. The gear train is fed the power stored in the main spring bit by tiny bit regulated by the stop start of the pallet fork and balance wheel.
Taking the numbers a bit further you will see that that tiny pallet fork is in motion quite a bit.... 8 x60x60x24=~691,200 oscillations per day or 4,838,400 per week or 252,460,800 times per year. That is a fair few exacting motions for one little pallet fork to perform exactly each second of the day over the life time of a watch which may be a 100 years and usually much more.

So a movement looses 4 seconds per day or 32 beats. That's 32/691,200 = 0.00462% loss per day or the movement maintains an accuracy of 99.99538% against all physical forces experienced by the movement during its normal daily activity riding along on your arm. Where has your arm been today? Golfing, wind surfing, motorcycle riding, pitching a game of baseball, diving, dirt cycling, hammering a few dozen nails in the shed, a bit of chainsaw work ....you get my drift. The movement has to compensate for all of those inputs and still deliver a very close approximation of the real elapsed time since you last looked at your watch. It does, to within 99.99538% which is pretty damn close to perfect for a mechanical assembly. Oh and we haven't even touched on aspects like temperature and pressure variation along with magnetic and electrical forces that are encountered in the every day environment.

In six months, .5% of 100 years, look back on the performance of your watch and see if it isn't, on average, keeping to with in the specifications. COSC chronometer certification allows for a varation of -4 to +6 seconds per day. If it is consistent, and holding to a set variation say -3, you have a time keeper, not just a watch. A predictable time keeper that will tell you the time to within a few seconds day in and day out.

A good source of information...

http://www.cosc.ch/methode.php?lang=en

Thanks for posting. I hope you are having a great start to the new year!!
Stunningly informative post. |> What fantastic little machines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh, I am more than pleased with the accuracy of the watch now that I know that what it is doing is acceptable. Thanks so much for the post defining all the movements....truly amazing! I just wasn't sure if I got duped or something.

I know someone requested pics, but I have a hard time getting some to turn out well. I have an 8.1 mp digi camera, just can't seem to get a clean picture I really like. I think I'll put the watch on one of the shelves in my safe with all the toys out of the way and get a good stand alone picture with the safe lighting. I got 3-24" flourescents in there so I shouldn't see any shadows in the pic;-). If I get some I'm happy with I will be more than glad to post them up.

Again thanks everyone for their input. I am a watch noob even though I have a couple of semi high dollar timepieces laying around.
 

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Hello SteelFish07,

So you have jumped in with both feet, congratulations on the purchase of a superlative time piece. The notion that a mechanical watch will perform to within .01 of a second per day accuracy is desirable but beyond the pocket of most normal men.
On the numbers...
Your watch beats 4 times per second or 8 back an forth motions of the pallet fork releasing energy into the gear train powering the hands. This is the "stop start" you observe of the centre second hand. Thats why it takes 42 hours for your watch to wind down if left motionless. The gear train is fed the power stored in the main spring bit by tiny bit regulated by the stop start of the pallet fork and balance wheel.
Taking the numbers a bit further you will see that that tiny pallet fork is in motion quite a bit.... 8 x60x60x24=~691,200 oscillations per day or 4,838,400 per week or 252,460,800 times per year. That is a fair few exacting motions for one little pallet fork to perform exactly each second of the day over the life time of a watch which may be a 100 years and usually much more.

So a movement looses 4 seconds per day or 32 beats. That's 32/691,200 = 0.00462% loss per day or the movement maintains an accuracy of 99.99538% against all physical forces experienced by the movement during its normal daily activity riding along on your arm. Where has your arm been today? Golfing, wind surfing, motorcycle riding, pitching a game of baseball, diving, dirt cycling, hammering a few dozen nails in the shed, a bit of chainsaw work ....you get my drift. The movement has to compensate for all of those inputs and still deliver a very close approximation of the real elapsed time since you last looked at your watch. It does, to within 99.99538% which is pretty damn close to perfect for a mechanical assembly. Oh and we haven't even touched on aspects like temperature and pressure variation along with magnetic and electrical forces that are encountered in the every day environment.

In six months, .5% of 100 years, look back on the performance of your watch and see if it isn't, on average, keeping to with in the specifications. COSC chronometer certification allows for a varation of -4 to +6 seconds per day. If it is consistent, and holding to a set variation say -3, you have a time keeper, not just a watch. A predictable time keeper that will tell you the time to within a few seconds day in and day out.

A good source of information...

http://www.cosc.ch/methode.php?lang=en

Thanks for posting. I hope you are having a great start to the new year!!
WOW, I want to thank you for this. You should try your hand at teaching, unless you are. You explained this complex subject with out talking down to or over the heads of most of us, well at least me.
Thank you again, Frank
 

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Ok, got home and moved my guns out of the way and got a few pics in the safe! Didn't have time to photo with all the guns so I got one with my favorite pistol, my Freedom Arms .50 Cal! Don't they go well together, two extraordinarily crafted pieces of stainless steel :p














 

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Please read the forum participation rules SteelFish07. Hand guns and blade weapons are not permitted. Its a simple rule and one that has been in force since the forum was established. It was a great shot as you said but the rules are what they are.
I trust we can work within them for the benefit of all.

5) Images in posts and signatures containing weapons of any kind (including, but not limited to, guns and knives) are not allowed. There is an exception for pictures of a documentary nature which illustrate the actual use of watches, and which are in keeping with the general theme of the forum in which they are posted. Staged or gratuitous pictures containing weapons, however, are prohibited without exception.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm sorry about the gun pic to anyone/everyone who may have been offended. I steer clear of the vulgar language usage and typically don't think much of posting a pic with a gun as being offensive, most good ol' boys don't. I meant no harm by it, simply something else I collect that I thought went well with the watch. So, that said, I won't make the same mistake again. :oops:
 
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