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Discussion Starter #1
Im getting a new strap for my Apple Watch and not sure what kind of adaptor to get. There are two types what I can find. One with springbars and one without.
Attaching image from google below.

Personally I think that the one without springbars looks much nicer, but changing straps would be a pain because you need to use a screwdriver to remove the adaptor from the strap.

Any thoughts on this? Have you maybe tried both? :)

adapters.jpg
 

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I think it depends on the strap. Leather would look good on the wire-style on the right, and metal links or mesh would look better with the springbar style on the left.

Unscrewing the wire style should only be a one-time thing, though. Open it up to install the strap, loc-tite the screws, and leave it. Maybe if you plan to reuse the adapters for different straps regularly, the springbar style would be more consistently reliable and easier to change.
 

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I use the springbar style, mostly with quick-change straps so I can roughly match the conventional watch I'll have on the other wrist. While the screwed-wire style indeed looks better, 1) it's an artificial look, since we know quite well the strap wasn't sewn around a fixed lug, 2) strap changes are a non-trivial effort for only that illusory aesthetic gain, and 3) while the Apple watch may be a handsome example of its particular variety of impressive technological device, it's not going to equal the standards many of us expect in terms of complexity and finish in a conventional watch, so pulling out all of the aesthetic stops is a bit more effort than I'm inclined to take.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think it depends on the strap. Leather would look good on the wire-style on the right, and metal links or mesh would look better with the springbar style on the left.

Unscrewing the wire style should only be a one-time thing, though. Open it up to install the strap, loc-tite the screws, and leave it. Maybe if you plan to reuse the adapters for different straps regularly, the springbar style would be more consistently reliable and easier to change.
Yeah, I think I agree with you on that.
Not sure how often I would actually change, and wire style definetley look much better 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I use the springbar style, mostly with quick-change straps so I can roughly match the conventional watch I'll have on the other wrist. While the screwed-wire style indeed looks better, 1) it's an artificial look, since we know quite well the strap wasn't sewn around a fixed lug, 2) strap changes are a non-trivial effort for only that illusory aesthetic gain, and 3) while the Apple watch may be a handsome example of its particular variety of impressive technological device, it's not going to equal the standards many of us expect in terms of complexity and finish in a conventional watch, so pulling out all of the aesthetic stops is a bit more effort than I'm inclined to take.
You have a good point there.
I wonder if the majority of people who have an Apple Watch do change straps a lot.
Personally I have a couple of nylon sport loops I change between. But a leather one is still som much nicer 🙂
 

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You have a good point there.
I wonder if the majority of people who have an Apple Watch do change straps a lot.
Personally I have a couple of nylon sport loops I change between. But a leather one is still som much nicer ��
My guess is that most do not. For one thing, Apple's straps are excellent for purpose, especially if one is not already an enthusiast of conventional watches. Second, even most buyers of conventional watches seem never to change a strap, at least until - if leather - it wears out.

Although I do see more people wearing both a smart watch and another watch, my neurosis regarding the strap of the Apple watch matching the other watch likely remains uncommon. :-d

(And as my Apple is gray - though matches the cheap black bracelet I bought fairly well - I have no idea how to match it when I wear a stainless watch on a stainless bracelet. Maybe I should get a stainless Series 5.)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You have a good point there.
I wonder if the majority of people who have an Apple Watch do change straps a lot.
Personally I have a couple of nylon sport loops I change between. But a leather one is still som much nicer ��
My guess is that most do not. For one thing, Apple's straps are excellent for purpose, especially if one is not already an enthusiast of conventional watches. Second, even most buyers of conventional watches seem never to change a strap, at least until - if leather - it wears out.

Although I do see more people wearing both a smart watch and another watch, my neurosis regarding the strap of the Apple watch matching the other watch likely remains uncommon.


(And as my Apple is gray - though matches the cheap black bracelet I bought fairly well - I have no idea how to match it when I wear a stainless watch on a stainless bracelet. Maybe I should get a stainless Series 5.)
Yeah I think that is the case too. But when I see the enormus amount of bands available from various dealers, there seems to be a huge market for it.

Actually I have never seen anyone wearing double watches (yet :)) but totally getting the point of it. I mean why not get the best of two worlds right? 😁

Think I might have to order both type of adaptors and try them out 😊
 

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Yeah, I think I agree with you on that.
Not sure how often I would actually change, and wire style definetley look much better 🙂
What I’ve seen AW strap hoarders... er, collectors... do is have adaptors already on all of their straps, whether they were purchased that way out-of-the-box or they added themselves to regular straps. That way, changing straps on a whim is as easy and quick as Apple intended.

As far as whether third-party straps are worth it, that’s up to you. I’ve told myself that I’d like to get a steel bracelet (whether Apple’s or third-party), a dressy leather strap, or a fabric Sport Loop, but the flueoroestomer... flouroealsto... rubber* Sport Band has been fantastic in day-to-day use, IMO. Easy to put on, pretty secure, easy to take off, and easy to clean. And the perforated Nike version I added last year is even more comfortable. I’ve had trouble convincing myself that a different strap would be any better.
 

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With Apple Watch you don't need to change the straps like you do with the conventional watches (i.e. removing springbars). Instead, you buy new adapters for each strap and then you have the straps ready all the time, with no worry about scratching the case. This changing system is really genius.

As for the popularity of straps, I can tell you that the majority of AW wearers have more than a few straps in their collection. Go take a look on some dedicated forums (non-WIS) and you will be amazed. I have around 5-6 of them already and many times I change them during the day, depending on the clothes or activity I am doing. To me, the OEM straps are the best watch straps I've seen on any watch.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
With Apple Watch you don't need to change the straps like you do with the conventional watches (i.e. removing springbars). Instead, you buy new adapters for each strap and then you have the straps ready all the time, with no worry about scratching the case. This changing system is really genius.

As for the popularity of straps, I can tell you that the majority of AW wearers have more than a few straps in their collection. Go take a look on some dedicated forums (non-WIS) and you will be amazed. I have around 5-6 of them already and many times I change them during the day, depending on the clothes or activity I am doing. To me, the OEM straps are the best watch straps I've seen on any watch.
Yeah, the quick change system is really awesome! Still only have the sportloop ones, bit Im going for a leather one next 🙂
 

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They are very good but a bit pricey compared with third party ones. I have one from Clockwork Synergy and the quality is quite good, not accounting for the choice of buckle and the non-tapered design.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
They are very good but a bit pricey compared with third party ones. I have one from Clockwork Synergy and the quality is quite good, not accounting for the choice of buckle and the non-tapered design.
I kind of like the non tapered design. A lot of straps are tapered (like normal watch straps) but I think i like the non tapered more 🙂
 

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I kind of like the non tapered design. A lot of straps are tapered (like normal watch straps) but I think i like the non tapered more ��
In my case, the main problem was not necessarily the tapered design but the buckle. Clockwork Synergy chose to use a too wide buckle, wider than the watch itself. To me this throws out the proportions when wearing the watch. I am looking to either change the buckle or file it down to a more aesthetic width.
 

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When I first started with the AW2, I bought a bunch of straps as well as several adapters. I gave the buyer of my 2 a couple of straps, then when I sold my AW3 I gave that buyer most of the rest. My Aw4 came with the Velcro sport strap. Never changed it. Easy to adjust. Comfortable and when it gets grubby in the summer, wash with soap and water or throw it in the washing machine and you are good to go. I do have a nice Alligator from one of my conventional watches, but haven’t put it on the 4. There are some really nice leather straps out there, but price is a consideration. A quality leather strap will be north of A hundred dollars and exotics like Alligator, Ostrich, Croc etc. can run to 200-300 dollars!! I will say, a nice leather strap definitely dresses the watch up, but at a price.
 

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10 years on mechanicals, new to AW, so here’s a dumb question: Why do third party bands use a spring bar or wire lug adapter? Why don’t they directly integrate the AW connector, like Apple’s own leather loop bands?

 

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10 years on mechanicals, new to AW, so here’s a dumb question: Why do third party bands use a spring bar or wire lug adapter? Why don’t they directly integrate the AW connector, like Apple’s own leather loop bands?

Because...

1. It’s easier to use existing straps from other watches, and...

2. Apple’s own leather-and-buckle straps (now discontinued for the 42-44mm watch, it seems) used wire-style adapters. I think they made them available for third parties to purchase. They also published an official spec sheet for companies to make their own.

 

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10 years on mechanicals, new to AW, so here’s a dumb question: Why do third party bands use a spring bar or wire lug adapter? Why don’t they directly integrate the AW connector, like Apple’s own leather loop bands?
Some do, but as BarracksSi, holding to a conventional mount allows strap emigration elsewhere, and strap immigration too.

I am more curious about the other direction of your inquiry: given the rapid, low-motor-precision-required changes possible with the Apple strap mechanism, why do we not see Apple compatible straps invading the conventional market for quartz* watches? Without looking, I'd assume it's related to patents, so maybe someday?

* Mechanical watches, due to magnetic complications, I can see why not.
 
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