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As a relative new-comer to the ranks of HEQ devotees, and having learned what little I know from generous and knowlegeable members of this forum, I have to ask for suggestions from some of those whose erudition I have learned from already.

Even though I recognize that my obsession with accuracy has nothing to do with practical necessity, I am only interested in watches that keep time to the level of +/- 10 seconds a year or better.

I have Citizen Chronomasters, Seiko quartz GS, Omega Constellation Double Eagle, Citizen Exceed Eco-drive and I was recently lucky enough to find a NOS Longines Conquest VHP; I have an RC Citizen Eco-Drive Attesa, a Seiko Radio Wave World Time Solar and an RC Junghans Mega 1000 digital. I had, but didn't like and therefore sold, a Breitling Aerospace.

What else is there that would satisfy my anal needs?
 

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You seem to have all the bases covered for relatively modern HEQ, so why not delve into the history behind the modern quartz watch? There's so many options to choose from - OK, compared to modern quartz, a tunning fork and 70's swiss quartz aren't that accurate today, but the cool factor these watches carry is not to be sniffed at, imo. My GP is regarded as the father of all modern quartz watches ...



Take a look at Omega's Megasonic and f300hz watches, IWC, GP and Bulova (Spaceview Accutron's are mouthwatering!:p), to name a few. Even Zenith produced this stunning digital analogue watch in the early 70's. If you can find one, its a real find!



Check out the sticky at the top regarding Notable HEQ watches.

All the best,

Fats
 

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You seem to have all the basis covered for relatively modern HEQ, so why not delve into the history behind the modern quartz watch? ... Even Zenith produced this stunning digital analogue watch in the early 70's. If you can find one, its a real find!

I agree with the suggestion, and, yes, that Zenith is very cool!
 

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Thank you both for the suggestions.......... I like the look of that Zenith and will do some sleuthing. I imagine they are rather hen's teeth but some-one may be feeling impoverished. When were they made?
 

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As a relative new-comer to the ranks of HEQ devotees, and having learned what little I know from generous and knowlegeable members of this forum, I have to ask for suggestions from some of those whose erudition I have learned from already.

Even though I recognize that my obsession with accuracy has nothing to do with practical necessity, I am only interested in watches that keep time to the level of +/- 10 seconds a year or better. ...
About 10 years ago I bought Michael Korda's book on watch collecting. I never read much of it but it just turned up from where it had been hiding and I looked at it again.

While his tastes in watches are not mine, he has an observation about collectors the rings true to me... the ones that are the most interesting are the ones that have a theme to their collection.

Originally I too was only interested in HEQ. But I now see interest in other things. (And I don't have the money to invest in costly new watches so I need to concentrate on used watches... economics is everywhere ;-) )

For my theme, I have kind of adopted the progress of time. I'm trying to build something that has representations of wrist watches that represented their era's attempt to produce an accurate affordable watch.

I've anchored the high end with the Longines VHP (I know, there are two. I now have both -- if anyone has any links for the old one's Conquest bracelet LET ME KNOW! :-d )

Now I'm filling in from WWI on. I'm learning a lot. It's fun. I'm having a ball :-!
 
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Krieger? They use ETA's thermolines and COSC certify their watches.

Breitling? Their quartz are all thermolines. There's probably a perpetual calendar model too (Colt? I'm not sure)

Rolex Oysterquartz? I think they're still produced in small quantities. It has an adjustment screw to regulate the time signal.

The Swiss autoquartz movement equipped watch? I think they're the non-temp. compensated equi. of the Thermoline.
 

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... The Swiss autoquartz movement equipped watch? I think they're the non-temp. compensated equi. of the Thermoline.
I don't think so. The ETA Thermolines and the ETA AutoQuartz movements are both fine movements but that is where the similarities end, in my opinion.
 

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Hi -

Sinn UX? This is one that will not only handle the time-keeping tasks with aplomb, but is also rated for -20° to +60° celsius. It uses the ETA 955.652, i.e. 11 1/2''' Thermoline calibre, runs off a lithium-ion battery rated for 7 years. After the 7 years, the watch needs to be sent back to Sinn for cleaning, new battery, and a new filling of oil.

The face of the watch has to be seen to be believed: from all angles it looks like the entire dial is directly on the surface of the sapphire, due to the refractive nature of the oil used. It's visible under water from all angles - no other types of watches can claim this - and wears rather well.

Case made of submarine steel. Check out the Sinn forum for more...

Sinn deliberately chose not to incorporate a radio-regulation mechanism, as the radio signal may not be available or, more importantly for the military, it may be susceptible to manipulation during wartime. Hence the choice of the 955.652.

JohnF

PS: I don't own one, but I have had one on at Sinn in Frankfurt. It's substantial, but wears like a much smaller watch. Way up there on my short list...
 
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I don't think so. The ETA Thermolines and the ETA AutoQuartz movements are both fine movements but that is where the similarities end, in my opinion.
Fair enough. I suggested this primarily because it's cheap enough to experiment with. I've had one or two owners of Autoquartz (and Swatch at tt) tell me its within 1-2s a month.
 

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Fair enough. I suggested this primarily because it's cheap enough to experiment with. I've had one or two owners of Autoquartz (and Swatch at tt) tell me its within 1-2s a month.
... and they can be regulated to improve their accuracy.

I'm a big collector of Autoquartz (about a dozen and a bunch of spare movements at last count), but if, by magic, all mine turned into thermolines, I'd be a very happy camper :-d

I think the Autoquartz are among the best quartz ever made, but the thermocompensated ETAs do set the bar!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi -

Sinn UX? This is one that will not only handle the time-keeping tasks with aplomb, but is also rated for -20° to +60° celsius. It uses the ETA 955.652, i.e. 11 1/2''' Thermoline calibre, runs off a lithium-ion battery rated for 7 years. After the 7 years, the watch needs to be sent back to Sinn for cleaning, new battery, and a new filling of oil.

The face of the watch has to be seen to be believed: from all angles it looks like the entire dial is directly on the surface of the sapphire, due to the refractive nature of the oil used. It's visible under water from all angles - no other types of watches can claim this - and wears rather well.

Case made of submarine steel. Check out the Sinn forum for more...

Sinn deliberately chose not to incorporate a radio-regulation mechanism, as the radio signal may not be available or, more importantly for the military, it may be susceptible to manipulation during wartime. Hence the choice of the 955.652.

JohnF

PS: I don't own one, but I have had one on at Sinn in Frankfurt. It's substantial, but wears like a much smaller watch. Way up there on my short list...

Yes, I forgot about that one. I went to a good deal of trouble and expense to buy one earlier this year (they weren't available from the US dealer) and although I liked everything about the spec and certainly the quality seemed fine, it was like wearing a Hummer on my wrist. It lasted even less long than the Breitling before it was sold.

Thanks for all the many interesting suggestions ....... I have a theory that collectors (of anything, not just watches) are either excited by the possession or by the process of acquisition. The latter includes the research, the search, the negotiation etc., but once the object is in one's hands (or, in the case of a watch, on one's wrist), the actual possession is a bit of an anti-climax and one tends to start looking for the next target. I find that I fall into the acquisition category but it has hitherto been superimposed on the perceived need for accuracy.

It remains to be seen whether the historical interest and high tech nature of watches from the 70s and 80s will overcome any shortcomings in the accuracy department.

Thanks to Alex (fatpants), I have bought a Zenith and am now awaiting its arrival with interest. It and a couple of other historical electronics (I'm not sure which are quartz and which tuning fork) will be the guinea-pigs for a new collection theme, if that's the right word.
 

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Thanks to Alex (fatpants), I have bought a Zenith and am now awaiting its arrival with interest. It and a couple of other historical electronics (I'm not sure which are quartz and which tuning fork) will be the guinea-pigs for a new collection theme, if that's the right word.
No worries, Fran! Looking forward to the pictures.

Alex:-!
 
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