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Discussion Starter #1
I think that I have reached a point where I want to look further into watches, apart from buying them, wearing them, exchanging straps and doing very basic things like changing a crown.
I am not certain if I will actually like to disassemble and assemble movements, lubricate them etc. So, I decided to attend an online course to see.
In order not to spend lots of money, I have a cheap collection of tools assembled and the only thing currently missing before I start with the course is to get oils.

The movement used in the course is a Seagull ST3600. It is suggested that I would need the oils below:
Bergeon1000-620-0005
Moebius 9010
Moebius 941
Moebius B5900-D5

But these oils cost too much for my budget. At this point I want to see if I like it and if I will manage to learn to do basic maintenance after practise. If I manage, I don't have a problem to buy all of the above. Do you know any chinese/cheap oils that correlate to the oils above in understandably lower quality, but good enough to get me through the course?
 

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I like to know too. :)
 

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I’ve spent the last while asking this question as well
I PM people on this forum and others and contacted some you tube repair guys, here is what I’ve been told:

1. Never use any no name cheap oil never never

2. As most of us start out with inexpensive Chinese and Russian movements we can get away with one oil and one grease to start Moebius 8000 and Moebius D5

3. If you decide to continue in this hobby, as soon as you can afford to buy more oils and grease and buy Moebius synthetic when ever possible.

I’m just a hobbyist, new to this as well, but this sounds like ok advice to me
 

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crAass...Hello!

As you'll soon discover, any discussion about oil is rather like those touching upon politics or religion or sex...

So: you cannot go wrong with Moebius 8000. It's what's called a 'natural' oil, which means that it's not synthetic, which implies that it will not last as long in a watch as will synthetic. 8000 has been around for several decades, and is generally considered ( by those who take it upon themselves to comment upon such things...) to be as good as any natural oil on this or--perhaps--any other Planet.

It's also a rather beautiful color, if aesthetics enters into your considerations. Looks great in the bottle. Really does.

To consider: although watch oils can be eye-wateringly expensive, a small bottle ( or vial, since many are really small ), will quite probably last you a few years. Within this context, then, although synthetic oils can be much more pricey than natural, you do achieve a First Rate result in the watch, and--if you break it down to a per-watch cost, you'll discover that it's pretty inexpensive.

Once again: from all that I've heard, something like 8000 was and continues to be a great oil. Where it's handed-off the 'Baton of Excellence' to synthetics probably has as much to do with in-watch longevity as anything: the older formulations continue to work just fine...it's just that synthetics work a bit better, for a bit longer.

For myself, I think the World of Moebius 9020 and 9010 and 941 and D5.

That's just me!

Michael.

ps: I will admit to being a bit sad to hear that oils from Countries other than Switzerland are sometimes looked down upon: the folks making these products are doing so to make a living as best they can, and I think that they deserve a chance to do just that.
 

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ps: I will admit to being a bit sad to hear that oils from Countries other than Switzerland are sometimes looked down upon: the folks making these products are doing so to make a living as best they can, and I think that they deserve a chance to do just that.
Would you want your watchmaker that you are paying good money to for servicing your watches "taking a chance" with using unproven oils?

These oils might be fine, but when you do this for a living, professional watchmakers like me aren't going to risk having comebacks, reputational hits, or whatever else may come with using an oil that doesn't prove to be as good as it needs to be. If you have one watch come back because of these unproven oils, any savings you might have realized from using them are immediately gone...one watch...

You seem to be saying this is some philosophical issue with oils from another country, when in reality it's simply a practical issue from a business perspective. To properly test an alternate oil, you would need to use it in a lot of watches and closely monitor those watches for years. Quite frankly, the oils that we use are not a huge cost in the big scheme of things - for a hobbyist yes, but for a professional who is servicing hundreds of watches a year. the price of watch oils is a drop in the bucket when it comes to expenses.

The folks who are servicing these watches are doing so to make a living as best they can...using oils that they know work.

Cheers, Al
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My main concern is that I read all over the place that these oils actually have an expiration date. If I could leave them on the self for a decade then I wouldn't really mind, but I see much shorter expiration dates on the bottles. So in essence it is probably a waste of money and a waste of a good product.
Maybe to just buy the 2 would be an option instead of 4.
 

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Archer...Hello!

Thanks for taking the time to express a Professional's opinion on oils: as an Amateur--at least on this point!--I have a different opinion.

And here's the idea I was trying to express: given, that a person making her or his living at the bench, will probably choose those lubricants that they have experience with and trust ( as you mention "....it's simply a practical issue from a business perspective." ), my opinion spoke to a rather different issue...one you accurately describe as "philosophical".

And that's it!

I was simply suggesting that anyone looking to buy an oil, might want to consider where it came from, and who made it. I assume that all these products are made and sold by folks just like you & I...people who want to have as good a Life as they can for themselves and those they care for, and that these lubricants are their way of trying to do just that.

So far as I can tell, Al, we're all on this Planet for just a very little time. Hardly an Instant, actually. I've even heard that we may end-up as dust between the Stars, forever.

Speaking just for myself--philosophically!--I'll take a chance on an 'off brand' oil, anytime. If it works, Great. If not, I'll try another.

( of course...I'll always keep my stash of Moebius, just in case ).

Michael.

ps: I hope that we still agree that Moebius 8000 is Great to look at!
 

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Rather than D5, I'd recommend HP-1300, the synthetic version. Regarding natural vs synthetic, you get twice the shelf life out of synthetic (six vs three years) and that alone justifies the extra price. Keep in mind that the shelf life starts at DOM and it might take a couple years to reach you, depending on how many hands it passes through. This business is like California's liquor business back in the sixties; designed for the most people to get a cut.

Once you've tooled up you'll look back at the price of your oils as a nit.
 
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