WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Got this today for $180 at a pawn shop. About 10 grams of 90% platinum with a ton of diamonds covering it. I don't like ladies watches because I can't wear them argh! Still a very nice piece for my collection and maybe my mom might wear it lol! I feel like a got a decent deal! Can anyone identify this model? I assume it was very high class for the time.
20170531_181603_resized.jpg 20170531_181744_resized.jpg 20170531_181753_resized.jpg 20170531_182032_resized.jpg 20170531_182112_resized.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,268 Posts
Platinum and Cal 911 indicate the watch is from 1938 or 1939

Platinum from woman's watches seemed to disappear after those years.

Here are some Hamilton catalogs from 1938 and 1939

The Hamilton 911 movement was brand new in 1938

1938
Hamilton Catalog 1938 - Vintage Watch Forums

1939
Hamilton Catalog 1939 - Vintage Watch Forums


In the 1938 catalog there is a blurb that states that there are braceleted and other versions of the platinum 911 Ladies watches that have to be directly ordered from Hamilton

In 1939 the catalog makes mention to a Platinum line of ladies watches called Lady Lancaster that were only available to be ordered by wholesalers. Your watch could be one of them.


However looking up the watch serial number, it gives a production date of 1942. Looking at the 1942 Catalog does not show any Platinum ladies models but there is a blurb that states that a watch not shown in the catalog is not necessarily discontinued so it could have been a 1942 model

Hamilton Catalog 1942 - Vintage Watch Forums
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hey thanks! I also found this online, looks like that 1942 ad is incomplete. I found this on eBay this is a 1942 ad as well, still not my same watch but a lot more similar ones!
s-l1600 (1).jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
It's a Hamilton movement but the case was made by an outside supplier. All Hamilton-cased watches of the era have the Hamilton name and Lancaster, PA address stamped inside the case back, and often the outside of the case back would be stamped Hamilton as well.

Such recasing was extremely common from the 1930s to the 1950s. It was a way for jewelers to offer watches that were not available elsewhere. Since customers couldn't compare prices for the identical watch at another store, jewelers could put extra-high markups on them. Trade journals like Jeweler's Circular Keystone carried lots of ads for such generic cases, complete with signed dials. I'm attaching one here.

Hamilton fought against recasing for years but never made much of a dent in the practice, even though they refused to repair such watches and called them 'counterfeits.' Here's a letter from 1957 restating their position.

The movements for such watches were acquired anywhere the jeweler could find them. They preferred used watches since they were cheaper, but they also commonly bought cheap gold-filled Hamilton watches and took out the movements, and scrapped the cases. At NAWCC regional shows in the late 80s and 90s I often found piles of NOS ladies' watch cases, complete with original price stickers on the backs, being sold for scrap value. There wasn't much interest in them since there was no real market for gold-filled ladies' watches, making it pointless to try to rebuild any of those cases into complete watches. The practice of scrapping out brand-new watches for their movements is what Hamilton was referring to in paragraph #4 of their letter. Salesmen were supposed to be alert to quantity purchases of ladies' watches that were suspicious.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Hey! Thanks for that ad, I was starting to think this was a recase by a jeweler around the 40s. Still a very cool piece for the collection! I paid a great price as well.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top