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Share your hierarchy on watches!
Don't debate, just share~
BTW, dont get offended~ its all just for fun.


1st tier <---worn by our overlords (kings)
VC, AP, PP and ALS

1.5 tier <----worn by vice presidents or directors (dukes)
Breguet, Blancpain

2nd tier <---worn by upper management (marquess)
JLC, IWC, UN, Franck Muller, Hublot

------cut off for highend----------

3rd tier <---worn by typical worker at a prestigious firm (counts)
Rolex, Chronoswiss, Cartier, Panerai, Chanel, Chopard

4th tier <---worn by wannabe high rollers (barons)
Omega, Breitling, Grand Seiko

5th tier <---worn by Obama...lol (knights)
TAG, Montblanc, Maurice LaCroix, Bell and Ross, Bvlgari, Hermes

6th tier <----worn by valet parking guys (peasants)
Fredrique Constant, Longiness

7th tier <--- worn by hoodlums from 3rd world countries (slaves)
timex, diesel, seiko, casio (especially G-shock)
 

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7th tier <--- worn by hoodlums from 3rd world countries (slaves)
timex, diesel, seiko, casio (especially G-shock)
It depends what Seikos we are on about.
Are we talking the low, low end ones, or the 7S26 equipped bits?

cheers,
Jake.
 

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Not a bad list! I have a hard time considering Grand Seiko as being tiered below Rolex and Cartier. I mean - finishing is on par, we have in-house movements etc, and the price points and target audiences are similar too. If anything you have higher proportion of hand finishing work which makes sense given their smaller production volumes. Anyway, its only my two cents as each of us WIS should make our own judgments!
 

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Perhaps not as fun as your list

I tend to classify "brands" by 3 categories of metrics:

Manufacturing Volume:
Low, Medium or High
Movements: In-house, Mix of In-House and Commodity, or Commodity
Case Metal: Mostly precious, Mix of Precious & Non-Precious, Mostly Non-Precious

I don't look too much into the whole "history" aspect because there is a lot of room for license here. So your top-tier brands have the following characteristics:

Manufacturing Volume:
Low to Medium
Movements: In-house
Case Metal: Mostly precious

The only real difference with the next tiers is that either the case metal category moves to a mix Mix of Precious & Non-Precious. That is all that really differs between a JLC or a BP and the ALS, AP, PP or VC. Moving down the food chain then leads to a mix of movements or an increase in manufactring volume. What is nice about this way of looking at things is that you can apply it to an individual watch as well as a brand. Many lower tier companies make some beautiful high-end pieces on a par with the best makers.

:)

Bob

Share your hierarchy on watches!
Don't debate, just share~
BTW, dont get offended~ its all just for fun.

1st tier <---worn by our overlords (kings)
VC, AP, PP and ALS

1.5 tier <----worn by vice presidents or directors (dukes)
Breguet, Blancpain

2nd tier <---worn by upper management (marquess)
JLC, IWC, UN, Franck Muller, Hublot

------cut off for highend----------

3rd tier <---worn by typical worker at a prestigious firm (counts)
Rolex, Chronoswiss, Cartier, Panerai, Chanel, Chopard

4th tier <---worn by wannabe high rollers (barons)
Omega, Breitling, Grand Seiko

5th tier <---worn by Obama...lol (knights)
TAG, Montblanc, Maurice LaCroix, Bell and Ross, Bvlgari, Hermes

6th tier <----worn by valet parking guys (peasants)
Fredrique Constant, Longiness

7th tier <--- worn by hoodlums from 3rd world countries (slaves)
timex, diesel, seiko, casio (especially G-shock)
 
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Share your hierarchy on watches!
Don't debate, just share~
BTW, dont get offended~ its all just for fun.

1st tier <---worn by our overlords (kings)
VC, AP, PP and ALS

1.5 tier <----worn by vice presidents or directors (dukes)
Breguet, Blancpain

2nd tier <---worn by upper management (marquess)
JLC, IWC, UN, Franck Muller, Hublot

------cut off for highend----------

3rd tier <---worn by typical worker at a prestigious firm (counts)
Rolex, Chronoswiss, Cartier, Panerai, Chanel, Chopard

4th tier <---worn by wannabe high rollers (barons)
Omega, Breitling, Grand Seiko

5th tier <---worn by Obama...lol (knights)
TAG, Montblanc, Maurice LaCroix, Bell and Ross, Bvlgari, Hermes

6th tier <----worn by valet parking guys (peasants)
Fredrique Constant, Longiness

7th tier <--- worn by hoodlums from 3rd world countries (slaves)
timex, diesel, seiko, casio (especially G-shock)
I will take 1.5 to start. Breguet because i made an overcoil and its not easy. But it looks cool in my Valj 72 and Venus 175. 3rd tier, Rolex Sea Dweller because it was a tool designed to save your life and you can wear it with a tux. Tier 4 Omega Flightmaster, because its the biggest chunk of stainless i own and i love the fact it was made for guys who fly planes. Tier 5 Heuer, because its the only one i own that doesnt have tag on it and no ones alive anymore that could talk about it. Tier 6 Longines 5 star Admiral, because i got to restore my dads watch while he was alive and give it to him to wear. Tier 7 My Citizen 67-9054 Chronograph, laugh all you want but the Japanese make excellent watches.
 

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I'd move JLC up to the top - they do have some very nice pieces that are on the same level as PP etc..

cheers,
Jake.
 

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Switch Omega and Channel imo. Add RM near the top and bump JLC up a row.
 

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I know this thread is just for humor, but come on...Let's inject a wee bit of realism here. There is something wrong when you place a company in tier 2 that creates watches like this:

The Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Compressor Extreme LAB :- The world first totally lubricant free watch took the extreme approach! - Luxury Watches Forums - Horomundi

http://www.watchprosite.com/show-forumpost/fi-2/pi-2210902/ti-360492/s-0/

Yer out of your mind if you think JLC isn't at the very top of the heap when it comes to actual horology.

Now, if you want to talk about jewelry..thats another story. It seems some people with more money than sense like to confuse watches with jewelry. :)
 

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I will take 1.5 to start. Breguet because i made an overcoil and its not easy. But it looks cool in my Valj 72 and Venus 175. 3rd tier, Rolex Sea Dweller because it was a tool designed to save your life and you can wear it with a tux. Tier 4 Omega Flightmaster, because its the biggest chunk of stainless i own and i love the fact it was made for guys who fly planes. Tier 5 Heuer, because its the only one i own that doesnt have tag on it and no ones alive anymore that could talk about it. Tier 6 Longines 5 star Admiral, because i got to restore my dads watch while he was alive and give it to him to wear. Tier 7 My Citizen 67-9054 Chronograph, laugh all you want but the Japanese make excellent watches.
You can wear a G shock too, doesn't mean it's appropriate.
 

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A more interesting ranking would be in terms of value for money, based on purchase and running costs, repair/replacement/insurance costs, timekeeping accuracy, and resistance to damage and wear.

But then the G-Shocks would be on top, so that can't be allowed :)
 

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Re: Perhaps not as fun as your list

I tend to classify "brands" by 3 categories of metrics:

Manufacturing Volume:
Low, Medium or High
Movements: In-house, Mix of In-House and Commodity, or Commodity
Case Metal: Mostly precious, Mix of Precious & Non-Precious, Mostly Non-Precious

I don't look too much into the whole "history" aspect because there is a lot of room for license here. So your top-tier brands have the following characteristics:

Manufacturing Volume:
Low to Medium
Movements: In-house
Case Metal: Mostly precious

The only real difference with the next tiers is that either the case metal category moves to a mix Mix of Precious & Non-Precious. That is all that really differs between a JLC or a BP and the ALS, AP, PP or VC. Moving down the food chain then leads to a mix of movements or an increase in manufactring volume. What is nice about this way of looking at things is that you can apply it to an individual watch as well as a brand. Many lower tier companies make some beautiful high-end pieces on a par with the best makers.

:)

Bob
Bob, very smart method of yours. I can subscribe to that. But it is not quite correctly applied.

VC for example is mostly modded JLC and Piguet movements. Similar for AP.

According to your astute system Lange should be at the top of the top. Then Patek (they have steel watches, higher production and have used non in-house movements).

Then JLC, if in-house is valued higher than precious metal. AP and VC rank only after that.

GP would rank in the same class as Breguet and Blancpain right after that.

This would give:

Tier 1: Lange and Patek
Tier 1.5: JLC, Rolex
Tier 2: AP, VC
Tier 3: GP, BP, Breguet

JLC is ONLY in-house movements. Same for Rolex, as of late. I also read that Rolex generates most of its revenue by precious metal watches. But I don't know about the number proportion of pieces sold.

I do propose a "mastery of complication" criterion and a "number of movements developed" criterion. I think both are important to judge the technical prowess of a company. And this is where Patek outshines Lange and JLC outshines Rolex further classifying among them.

The OP's tier 2 is totally screwed up. Hublot? Come on! IWC? Not really! In the same tier as JLC? That was the best joke this year! :D LOL!
However, I do understand that the OP's ranking was more a prestige ranking and social ranking. As such it was not bad. If based on horological achievement and Bob's system (which I think is good) it was terribly off. Which goes to show the discrepancy between these two things.
 

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Re: Perhaps not as fun as your list

I am not sure that I follow your logic...

Because a brand is 100% in-house does not on its own equate to top tier. Yes, Lange, Patek, JLC and Rolex manufacture their own movements. This in my mind, does not create a tier. The fact that some established houses are both a manufacture and an Etablisseur does not degrade a company in my mind. They were just seeking the best technology available, as was the long-standing tradition is Swiss watchmaking. Jaeger-LeCoultre makes some very fine movements and that is why they are sought out. Additionally, we are now dealing with "brands" and not companies. So if Richemont needs a calibre for a VC watch and JLC makes a good one, they will use it. I think that both Lemania (Breguet) and Frederic Piguet (Blancpain) both make some excellent movements that are on a par with the very best. I personally do not care whether or not it is in-house. "In-house" is used as a marketing tool like "history".

The % of precious metals is 100% for ALS and it is reflected in its median price. So from an exclusivity perspective; ALS does have low volumes, a high median price driven by precious metals and exclusive movements. Does that make it a higher tier? For some , yes. All of the top companies like Audemars Piguet, Blancpain, Breguet, Chopard, Credor, Girard Perregaux, Glashuette Original, IWC, Jaeger LeCoultre, Patek Phillipe, Ulysse Nardin, Vacheron Constantin and many others make some models on a caliber with the very best. The main difference that I was trying make is that it is the % of precious metals in the that is the primarry differentiator.

I view Rolex as a completely different animal. Some of the most robust and finest, high production luxury watches available. Their volume, manufacturing methods and availability to me, erode their place among the luxury brands. I frankly think of them when I think of Breitling and Omega who also are both high-volume luxury watch makers. The largest of the above listed companies only come within and order of magnitude of Rolex in terms of output. Because exclusivity (not the exclusivity of price, but commonality) is important to me (not to others). Some folks care more that someone knows what they are wearing. To each their own.

My $.02,

Bob
Bob, very smart method of yours. I can subscribe to that. But it is not quite correctly applied.

VC for example is mostly modded JLC and Piguet movements. Similar for AP.

According to your astute system Lange should be at the top of the top. Then Patek (they have steel watches, higher production and have used non in-house movements).

Then JLC, if in-house is valued higher than precious metal. AP and VC rank only after that.

GP would rank in the same class as Breguet and Blancpain right after that.

This would give:

Tier 1: Lange and Patek
Tier 1.5: JLC, Rolex
Tier 2: AP, VC
Tier 3: GP, BP, Breguet

JLC is ONLY in-house movements. Same for Rolex, as of late. I also read that Rolex generates most of its revenue by precious metal watches. But I don't know about the number proportion of pieces sold.

I do propose a "mastery of complication" criterion and a "number of movements developed" criterion. I think both are important to judge the technical prowess of a company. And this is where Patek outshines Lange and JLC outshines Rolex further classifying among them.

The OP's tier 2 is totally screwed up. Hublot? Come on! IWC? Not really! In the same tier as JLC? That was the best joke this year! :D LOL!
However, I do understand that the OP's ranking was more a prestige ranking and social ranking. As such it was not bad. If based on horological achievement and Bob's system (which I think is good) it was terribly off. Which goes to show the discrepancy between these two things.
 
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In keeping with the topic, I share (and neither explain nor defend) my rankings. Do bear in mind the list originated in the mid 80's when I began collecting, and I live in the watch world of Swiss post WWII to early 1970's:

1) Patek Philippe, 2) Vacheron & Constantin, 3) Audemars Piguet , 4) Breguet, 5) IWC, 6) Rolex, 7) Le Coultre, 8) Omega, 9) Universal, 10) Longines.

I also remember starting out (and not affording the top 4) that no matter how trashed out the watches were, the Rolexes, Le Coultres, and Longines always ran, and the Longines kept the greatest accuracy.

Aren't personal experiences wonderfully diverse? Embrace it, don't criticize it! Or do, because sometimes (tastefully executed) that's fun, too.
 
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