WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello watch lovers,

After months of being a casual observer, I finally joined watchuseek so I can comment and learn about new and old watches that look great!

I would like to start off asking about anti-magnetic properties in a dive watch. Mainly, why its included and why it's not.

For example, Victorinox/Swiss army released one of their quartz dive watches this year advertised as 'anti-magnetic', only rated at 200m depth.

yet I see some higher end dive watches rated at 300m not have the anti-magnetic feature. Is it an expensive feature to add in a dive watch?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
Hello watch lovers,

After months of being a casual observer, I finally joined watchuseek so I can comment and learn about new and old watches that look great!

I would like to start off asking about anti-magnetic properties in a dive watch. Mainly, why its included and why it's not.

For example, Victorinox/Swiss army released one of their quartz dive watches this year advertised as 'anti-magnetic', only rated at 200m depth.

yet I see some higher end dive watches rated at 300m not have the anti-magnetic feature. Is it an expensive feature to add in a dive watch?
There is no relationship between WR and anti-magnetic capability. It would be interesting to know how it affects the price of a watch though as it would be a reasonable thing as it requires the watch be designed to fit a faraday cage around the movement. That would make it tricky, potentially, to use off the shelf components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
It's all marketing, except for people who come into close contact with strong magnetic fields, and insist on wearing a mechanical watch instead of a Quartz.

If you used a mechanical dive watch rather than a dive computer when scuba diving, not getting your mechanical watch magnetized would be important if you were using it to time your decompression time. I imagine that it could be rather stressful to see the seconds hand race at 5-6x normal speed while you are looking at it during your decompression, particularly if you were close to the end of your air supply.

Watch makers say magnetization is the most common reason people take a watch in for repair, and I believe them. Any electric motor puts out a magnetic field when it's running and if your mechanical watch is close enough to it long enough, parts within it can get turned into a magnet, a problem that will persist until you get it demagnetized. I'll bet TSA has magnetized millions of watches in its X-ray baggage screen (electric motors power the belt moving the bags through).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
There is no relationship between WR and anti-magnetic capability. It would be interesting to know how it affects the price of a watch though as it would be a reasonable thing as it requires the watch be designed to fit a faraday cage around the movement. That would make it tricky, potentially, to use off the shelf components.
You are spot on about no relationship between WR and anti-magnetic. There are two common ways to make a watch anti-magnetic. The first as mentioned is a faraday cage. There is a soft iron case that the movement is placed into where the only openings are for the various hand pivots, crown and pushers where needed for function.

The other is the use of an anti-magnetic material used for the hairspring because this is the one component that is the heart of the watch and the most vulnerable to magnetic fields.

There are watch brands that go further by either using anti-magnetic material in the escapement components or in the case of Omega use amagetic material in the entire escapement mechanism.

Now the million dollar question. Do you need a watch the is anti-magnetic or amegnetic? Answer is, depends on many factors to include where do you work, live, travel, how much do you want to pay for a watch and so on.

So it comes down to one thing. Choice and how much you are willing to pay because adding features adds cost. And do you really need the anti-magnetic feature. You have to realize that most watches made today and in the past are not anti-magnetic and they do just fine as daily wear watches.

I like the added benefits of anti/amegnetic watches and am willing to suffer the increased cost for these features.

What ever you choose, choose it because it make you smile when you look at the watch. Whether that be because of how it looks and or what's inside.

Welcome to the club

Darn, forgot about quartz watches. Yes, they can be affected by magnetic fields. So this is addressed in three ways. By a faraday cage and electronic compensation (think super quartz) look at Breitling and Tissot on how they handle magnetic fields with some of their quartz watches. And the last is do nothing. The watch will just more or less reset itself and continue on albeit with a loss or gain in time. But don't forget, a strong enough magnetic field can kill a watch. So don't wear one in an MRI or near CERN.

Unless it's an amegnetic Omega. There newest movement has been tested against 80,000 gauss and kept on running within their METAS specs. Otherwise, it passed with flying colors.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
You are spot on about no relationship between WR and anti-magnetic. There are two common ways to make a watch anti-magnetic. The first as mentioned is a faraday cage. There is a soft iron case that the movement is placed into where the only openings are for the various hand pivots, crown and pushers where needed for function.

The other is the use of an anti-magnetic material used for the hairspring because this is the one component that is the heart of the watch and the most vulnerable to magnetic fields.
The thread is from a year ago and the OP still only has 42 posts, so likely long gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,447 Posts
The thread is from a year ago and the OP still only has 42 posts, so likely long gone.
Ah, but I only just found this one while browsing and found it most informative! The value of some of these threads often endure well beyond the initial query.


"Expecto Inopinatum"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
How does a Quartz watch get affected by magnetism? The stepper motors? I would think that would require a much stronger field, right? My dive watch is an Eco-Zilla variant (the aqualand depth meter). I only wear it in the water (it's just too big for land use), as a back up for the dive computer, so I haven't exposed it to magnetism (something a do with my mechanical "land" watches....not voluntarily I might add). The Citizen is much more accurate than a mechanical watch, and the depth meter gives me both max depth and current depth, and it's cheap enough that if it ends at the bottom of he ocean, I won't go into mourning. If I wanted the same depth meter functions on a mechanical dive watch (IWC deep three) I'd have to spend over 10x more (and the IWC deep one, two or three are not antimagnetic...the JL seal team and the Blancpain X fathom depth meter divers are antimagnetic, but only the Emir of Abu Dabi can afford those things...plus they're both giants). The Oris depth meter only gives the current depth so you need to remember how deep you went (it is affordable but I don't remember if it's protected from strong magnetism).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,619 Posts
Funny. OBVIOUSLY the anti-magnetic design is to protect the watch, but I had that wrong. I was thinking that it would be a watch made of materials that would not mess with the functions of a compass. Oops. If I were actually using my watch for my diving, I would have to dance it around my survey equipment to make sure it doesn't sway my heading. Good thing my "diver watch" is a shearwater petrel...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
Funny. OBVIOUSLY the anti-magnetic design is to protect the watch, but I had that wrong. I was thinking that it would be a watch made of materials that would not mess with the functions of a compass. Oops. If I were actually using my watch for my diving, I would have to dance it around my survey equipment to make sure it doesn't sway my heading. Good thing my "diver watch" is a shearwater petrel...
Yeah, never wear metal equipment next to your compass. I wear the watch on the left and the computer/compass on the other, so not an issue. Easy mistake to make though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Yeah, never wear metal equipment next to your compass. I wear the watch on the left and the computer/compass on the other, so not an issue. Easy mistake to make though.
Is your dive computer air integrated? I'm sort of hesitant about adopting one of these fancy new wrist mounted air integrated dive computers based on reviews I've seen on loosing the connection with the sensor during a dive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,619 Posts
Is your dive computer air integrated? I'm sort of hesitant about adopting one of these fancy new wrist mounted air integrated dive computers based on reviews I've seen on loosing the connection with the sensor during a dive.
If there's any company that can do it, it would be shearwater. Still, for me, it's not a convenience worth the risk, or the cost for that matter.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
Is your dive computer air integrated? I'm sort of hesitant about adopting one of these fancy new wrist mounted air integrated dive computers based on reviews I've seen on loosing the connection with the sensor during a dive.
I run a Hollis TX-1, which is gas-integrated. Actually it can track up to 5 buddies' gas too if I pair them before diving. I've not had any issues with it losing connection, though I use the wireless as a redundancy. I like the integration as it plots your useage and tells you how long you have at that rate at that depth. Very useful. I have a hard line also as I don't trust wireless anything.



You can see the gas time remaining being tracked as the dark blue line on the profile below...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I like the warm fuzzy feeling I get knowing my dive computer is tracking my air supply and don't mind spending more on the computer than the dive watch. Still it's good to have a depth meter watch (or a wrist mounted back up dive computer if you don't want to use the tables) and knowing what the no deco time is in case your air integrated console computer blows up.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top