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Discussion Starter #1
I know this is a long shot,and I've googled till I'm blue in the face, but I thought I'd give it a shot. I have a bronze Moray coming, I love zulus, but I can't find one with bronze or brass hardware.Even if I could just find the hardware I'd make my own strap. Thanks!
 

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Didn't some guy on WUS do a bronzing on his Tuna Shroud and hex screws a while back with some Coca Cola and a Battery? Maybe you can do the same to some SS Zulu hardware to get the same effect?

Found the link:

http://forums.watchuseek.com/f74/my-bronze-tuna-emperor-535910.html

He had titanium parts to work with a home made anodizer to get the bronze look. Not sure if it this anodizing trick will work on SS.
 

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Wow, that's crazy!!! I'm not sure I'd attempt that, but who knows?? But I have a feeling that s/s wouldn't react the same as ti,and I haven't been able to find ti hardware either. At least I know ti will react to oxi-clean while s/s won't.Thanks, though, I'm glad to have seen that link,he got an amazing look, and if I thought it would work with s/s, and thought I wouldn't electrocute myself, I'd probably try it.-)
 

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just get stainless hardware and blast it with a torch

stainless oxidizes to different colors based off different temperatures
i forget my colors exactly, but you should get a nice bronze around ~600F / Dull Cherry Red Glowing
go ahead and google it and im sure you'll find it.
You can get a lot of cool colors as well, from light pale blue, dark blue, bronze, brown, and a few things in between.

If you've ever seen stainless steel headers\mufflers that have this coloration, this is why.

the oxide is relatively permanent...similar to anodizing (since theyre both just oxide layers)
if you scratch the surface you will scratch it off
 

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Just found this after some searching on the web... Color degreased titanium with batteries or an anodizer. Fill a plastic container with an acid or alkaline solution. Connect your positive terminal to the titanium using a titanium wire and alligator clip. Use any kind of wire and alligator clip to attach your positive terminal to a rust-proof piece of metal. Put both pieces in the tank and let the current flow. The color change depends on the voltage. Achieve a light yellow with 9 V, light blue with 18 V, deeper blue with 50 V, and bright green at 110 V. Use a torch or kiln to color titanium; heat the titanium to 640 degrees F to color the metal.

Read more: Coloring, Bronzing & Patination of Metals | eHow.com Coloring, Bronzing & Patination of Metals | eHow.com

A Green AutoZilla! Would look SICK!
 

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This really isn't going to help. But I bought one from a small watch repair/key cutting/shoe repair stall at my local shopping centre. Unfortunately both the strap & stall are gone.

Bottom line is, they're out there.





These are the only photo's I have.

Jeff.
 
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