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These are usually called 'jump hour' watches. The Swiss versions are a 60s/70s phenomena. Many are pin levers. Almost always they are sold under brand names which are little known nowadays.
 
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I have owned a few Kingston pin lever 'chronostop' pieces from the 60s. I always assumed they were generic movements made for affordable 'complications' that were marketed under brands with an 'English' flair such as Sheffield Kingston, Saxony, Trafalgar, etc.
 

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Here is my Jump hour watch.

P6213377.jpg
I love the big in your face look.

P6213370.jpg
They are rather unpolished inside.

They are cheaply made and the glas is just held in by the movenet and dial so dirt gets into the movement very easy. Pin lever movements weren't meant to be repaired and when a watch came in under warrenty they just swapped out the movement for a new one.

There is some talk on the net about how good pin lever movement are and that they perform just as good as more expensive ones but this is only true when they are new and they just don't have the stamina and wear down faster.
 

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There is some talk on the net about how good pin lever movement are and that they perform just as good as more expensive ones but this is only true when they are new and they just don't have the stamina and wear down faster.
Well there are pin levers and then there are pin levers. The better ones come with properly sealed cases and jewels. Still not as good in the long run, but certainly in the service and repairable category.
 

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Well there are pin levers and then there are pin levers. The better ones come with properly sealed cases and jewels. Still not as good in the long run, but certainly in the service and repairable category.
Could well be but I know that Timex just swapped them out even though they had good seals. This one however is much more serviceable with easy removal of main parts unlike the Timex models I have.
 

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Could well be but I know that Timex just swapped them out even though they had good seals.
Timex did that because it was cheaper than repairing them. Timex movements are better than many think and contrary to 'common knowledge' they are repairable. One Swiss company (I always forget the name) produced pin levers at chronometer standards - a bit extreme perhaps but Swiss competition laws prevented them from making lever movements. But even the mass producers could make them much better than the ones shown above - for example (though not at all up to the standard of MST lever movements)

The Metatechnical Cabinet - MST 374
 

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There are direct read watches and there are direct read jump hour watches, but the first need not necessarily be the second.

A jump hour watch is one in which the movement has a jump hour feature/complication - that is, the hour indicator jumps to the next position instantaneously rather than continually revolves as per a normal indicator/hand. The majority of direct read (or digital mechanical) watches are not jump hours.
 

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Timex did that because it was cheaper than repairing them. Timex movements are better than many think and contrary to 'common knowledge' they are repairable. One Swiss company (I always forget the name) produced pin levers at chronometer standards - a bit extreme perhaps but Swiss competition laws prevented them from making lever movements. But even the mass producers could make them much better than the ones shown above - for example (though not at all up to the standard of MST lever movements)

The Metatechnical Cabinet - MST 374
I guess that the bad reputation was fueled by lever manufacturers as well.

I live and learn every day. :)
 

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It was Oris that had a number of pin-lever movements COSC certified, (242 certificates between 1945 - 1953, I have read). Under Swiss government anti-competition legislation Oris was restricted to producing only pin-lever movements from around 1934 up to as late as the mid-1960s. Thus Oris tended to take pin-lever movement development further than many other companies.
 

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In genral the value of jump hour watchers are rather high and the ones to look out for are Sicura Jump Hour Watches because of the wacky design and the "you all know why reason". I saw a good version of my watch go for $70 on ebay and that is not bad for a simple pin lever watch.
 
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