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I don't own any smart watch myself, but if they are just designed to have such a short life span (as with the mandatory cellphone), I cannot ever see myself investing in any smart watch. Would I buy any watch which had such a short life expectancy? I don't think so. If these smart watches were given away as a freebie when you purchase a new cellphone, then I could see the attraction of owning one. But to pay multiple £££$$$ on top the purchase price for the cellphone, I cannot see the the attraction to fork out again in another three years or so.
Here is the article
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/apr/15/apple-iphone-last-three-years-mac-computer-four
 

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Kind of reminds me of a scam house security company that was taken to court a while back for selling house alarms which had a circuit built in, to disable the alarm after a certain time period shortly after the warranty had run out. They made a fortune so called repairing all these, but the consumer right were onto them.
 

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Many keep their macs and idevices longer than that, much linger for macs It is not because the older ones are technically not cutting edge anymore that they have become useless.
 

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Many keep their macs and idevices longer than that, much linger for macs It is not because the older ones are technically not cutting edge anymore that they have become useless.
I love apple computers and have been using their laptops for years. I travel quite a bit, and for some reason I have never had a computer last more than about 3 years. Invariably, the hard drive engage mechanism always poops out and apple says it will cost 100000 USD to fix it, at which point I just get a new one.

Annoying, but forced obsolescence keeps the profits flowing. Perhaps I am just hard on my gear.

Until the Apple Watch has a teleportation feature, I will never buy one.
 

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Maybe apple don't feel there is enough money in the AW to follow the same release cycle as the iPhone. Maybe they want to invest the R&D money in other products.
 

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The key is the vast majority of their target audience won;t keep them that long anyway. While I keep a phone until it dies my wife and most of mine/her friends get a new one as soon as the next generation comes out. I am an AV geek and buy new TVs and projectors long before they die so I understand the concept.
 

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Obviously if it is useful to my daily life (it isn't so far from what I've seen) - I'd pay 300, 400 bucks for a device that only lasts 3 years. That's hardly outrageous. Laptops and cellphones can have around that length of lifespan.
 

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It's the same with mobile phones. The phone is usually outdated after 3 or 4 years.

I had a perfectly fine Samsung Galaxy Ace 2. I bought it when it was already about 2 years on the market. I turned off automatic software and app upgrades because I wanted to choose myself. Then it started to go funny, think photobucket compatibility with my browser and every other browser was the first to play up. So then I manually uptated the phone which then made it unusable.


If you think you are gonna have a fully functioning easy to usr modern smartphone or watch forever then you're gonna be disappointed.
 

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I'm still on my iPhone 5S, which is pushing three years old. It runs fine (iOS 9.3.1 is just as quick as the original OS it shipped with), but it needs a fresh battery.

The obsolescence life cycle is much longer for Apple. Seven years, I think, is the point where they stop making replacement parts. Apple had to discontinue the long-running iPod Classic, too, because nobody was making the hard drives anymore.
 

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Also, people don’t upgrade because their products are useless, they upgrade because they want new features. My dad’s still using an iPhone 4S—his needs are simple so he’s happy with it, and the phone still works.

Upgrading is expensive, but not upgrading means missing out on new features. For most people, around three years is a good compromise. Smartwatches, like other computers, will follow the same pattern. If you don’t upgrade your computer, and tablet, and smartphone frequently, then you also prolly won’t upgrade your smartwatch too frequently.



I don't own any smart watch myself, but if they are just designed to have such a short life span (as with the mandatory cellphone), I cannot ever see myself investing in any smart watch. Would I buy any watch which had such a short life expectancy? I don't think so. If these smart watches were given away as a freebie when you purchase a new cellphone, then I could see the attraction of owning one. But to pay multiple £££$$$ on top the purchase price for the cellphone, I cannot see the the attraction to fork out again in another three years or so.
Here is the article
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/apr/15/apple-iphone-last-three-years-mac-computer-four
“Investing”? If you’re buying a smartwatch as an “investment,” you’re barking up the wrong tree. People don’t buy electronics for investments, they buy them for convenience and productivity.

My watch does a lot of things. If I keep my watch for 3 years and it costed me $400, that’s $2.74 per day. That’s cheaper than a coffee at Starbucks—which I use my watch to pay for.

Heck, even for complications alone—day/date; sunrise/sunset; time zones; moon phase; and, to get really fancy, planetarium—even if I buy a new AW Sport every two years for the rest of my life, that’ll still cost me less than a mechanical watch with all of those complications. Some people want to buy a watch as an investment; some people want to buy a watch they will use.
 

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My ETA powered SANDOZ had lived with me from the day i bought, till today... 20yrs and still rockin!!!
 

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Also, people don’t upgrade because their products are useless, they upgrade because they want new features. My dad’s still using an iPhone 4S—his needs are simple so he’s happy with it, and the phone still works.

Upgrading is expensive, but not upgrading means missing out on new features. For most people, around three years is a good compromise. Smartwatches, like other computers, will follow the same pattern. If you don’t upgrade your computer, and tablet, and smartphone frequently, then you also prolly won’t upgrade your smartwatch too frequently.





“Investing”? If you’re buying a smartwatch as an “investment,” you’re barking up the wrong tree. People don’t buy electronics for investments, they buy them for convenience and productivity.

My watch does a lot of things. If I keep my watch for 3 years and it costed me $400, that’s $2.74 per day. That’s cheaper than a coffee at Starbucks—which I use my watch to pay for.

Heck, even for complications alone—day/date; sunrise/sunset; time zones; moon phase; and, to get really fancy, planetarium—even if I buy a new AW Sport every two years for the rest of my life, that’ll still cost me less than a mechanical watch with all of those complications. Some people want to buy a watch as an investment; some people want to buy a watch they will use.
A lot of good points but your math is weak :)
 

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We shouldn't confuse the article with believing that the AW has a built in obsolesce of three years. I think the 3 years is more of a business guidance used in their business plan. The product is built to last more than that, and as long as you are OK with the feature limitation over the time, it will probably live more. Changing the battery will be a real issue as most probably Apple won't provide a new one after some time (heck, they don't want to change it on my 4 years old iPad 3).
 

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We shouldn't confuse the article with believing that the AW has a built in obsolesce of three years. I think the 3 years is more of a business guidance used in their business plan. The product is built to last more than that, and as long as you are OK with the feature limitation over the time, it will probably live more. Changing the battery will be a real issue as most probably Apple won't provide a new one after some time (heck, they don't want to change it on my 4 years old iPad 3).
Exactly. I expect the basic protocols to keep working for several years. The attraction of newer models will be size, new sensors (health will be a killer app for weaeables), a facetime camera etc. But like a new rolex, it doesn t mean thar the previous gen is suddenly useless.
Regarding battery, it can be replaced with a tool and you can bet that vendors will offer the service for several years.
 

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I feel like it's a love/hate thing for me personally.
My dad has always had awesome mechanical watches that have lasted my entire life, so automatics always have a place in my heart.
But I love all of the extra things my Apple Watch can do, particularly making me more aware of my activity/health - that alone makes the price worth it for me.
 

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The type of person who buys that sort of watch will have ditched it by then as they will have a new model to wear then and it will be technically outdated, so it wont be very smart any more either, the reality is that these are throw away disposable items, just like mobile phones.
 

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I don't own any smart watch myself, but if they are just designed to have such a short life span (as with the mandatory cellphone), I cannot ever see myself investing in any smart watch. Would I buy any watch which had such a short life expectancy? I don't think so. If these smart watches were given away as a freebie when you purchase a new cellphone, then I could see the attraction of owning one. But to pay multiple £££$$$ on top the purchase price for the cellphone, I cannot see the the attraction to fork out again in another three years or so.
Here is the article
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/apr/15/apple-iphone-last-three-years-mac-computer-four
This is an inherent property of a product that is basically computing device. Silicon-based products such as computer, cell phone, and this smart watch will render itself almost totally useless in less than ~10yrs at most because the technology (both hardware and software) advances in such a high pace as demanded by the modern culture of the society. IMO, a traditional watch and smart watch are two different things altogether (despite the word "watch" is in both names).
 

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Calm down people.

If you read Apple's webpage, you'll see that, for the purpose of a product lifecycle assessment, they model customer's expected usage to be about 3 years. This means they expect people to sell the watch, on average, after 3 years. Once sold, someone else wears the watch for some time after that (perhaps after the battery is replaced, and perhaps the case as well), so the total years is longer than 3 years:

http://www.apple.com/environment/answers/

But yes, they don't expect people to wear a smart watch beyond X number of years (I don't expect it to last more than 5-7 years personally). It's not a traditional watch.


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