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Rather than a full blown review I wanted to touch on a few aspects of this watch that stand out to me, and my personal take on the upsides and downsides of the watch. Overall, the former outweigh the latter to a significant degree.


Let’s start with the case. This is the part of a watch that often makes or breaks it for me. I can learn to love a watch with a stunning case but mediocre dial in a way I never could with the assessments reversed. For that reason I’ve often considered buying the 39mm Archimede Outdoor Protect despite being generally unmoved by the dial.

The 41mm diameter of the Outdoor AntiMag is a reasonable boost from the 39mm Outdoor Protect. Offering another variant in the family in a new size is good to see, and I’m happy to see a sensible increase applied here. Although the lugless design will stop the watch from giving any “overhang” on the average wrist until it grows by quite a lot more, the body of the watch still feels substantial enough as it is.

Although the scalloped lug area draws the eye initially, I found that aspect of the design very easy to live with and almost inconspicuous. Instead, the part of the case I found myself inspecting and admiring the most was the crown guards. The lines are soft and organic, yet with plenty of distinct arcs and surfaces to draw the eye.


I’m familiar with several hardened steel cases from Damasko and Sinn, and each time I handle them I’m left with a real tool watch vibe. This is in part due to the blasted finish that usually accompanies it. In the case of the Archimede I don’t get the same at all, and I’m still not sure if that’s a good thing or a bad thing. The hardness is right up there as a true tool watch attribute, but the Outdoor AntiMag doesn’t shout about it. The subtle brushing flies under the radar and gives more freedom for Archimede to give the watch a finish befitting the overall design rather than being restricted by the “prescribed” hardened steel finish.

The thickness and the profile of the case also somehow hides the soft iron core inside that helps provide magnetic resistance up to 1000 gauss. It feels (and is) far slimmer on the wrist than a Milgauss. I’ve never been overly bothered by the thickness of the Milgauss, but I’ll admit it’s an achievement that, much like the hardened steel case, you’d be forgiven for not even suspecting the anti-magnetic properties had you not known (or read it on the dial).


And so to the dial. As I admitted above, it’s not one that has strongly appealed to me in the past and it’s not one that will linger in my thoughts in the future. That’s not to say it’s at all bad, just not memorable or particularly in tune with my tastes. The crisp white printing and bold white hands over the matte black dial give excellent readability, and as far as telling the time goes I can’t fault it. The blued second hand gives the watch a feel very similar to the Damasko DA38 and that’s no bad thing, and the white tip on the Archimede probably elevates it above.


I did find the date window to be slightly awkward though. On the 39mm Outdoor Protect the date window sits perfectly in place of the three, but due to the increased dial here the date window is left hanging a little. It’s not terrible, but not quite as neatly integrated as on the smaller dial.

Part of my gripe (perhaps too strong a word) with field watches – or dials that live in that general area, is the level of clutter that often comes from all of the markings that are included. I was pleased to find that the Archimede copes with that problem* fairly well. *Ok, so it’s my problem really. Each of the 11 remaining lumed Arabic numerals are accompanied by a large lumed block, and that’s it on the main surface of the dial. The vertical portion of the chapter ring displays dashes for the minutes (or seconds), which then leads to a sloped surface showing numerals in intervals of five. Both are visible if you need them, but I grew to like the fact that there are never too many markings visible at the same time from any particular angle.


The strap that comes on the Outdoor AntiMag is surprisingly good. The leather is soft and supple and gave a good fit for my seven inch wrist. This particular style of leather, slightly notched and with stitching around the lug area, isn’t normally to my taste but visually does work well against the arcs of the case. I’m pleased to see a bracelet option is available for the watch as that is how I would probably choose to wear it.

I haven’t measured accuracy or power reserve – only noted that my main requirements were fully met. They are:
After taking it off in the evening, and after a day of wearing something else, I can pick up the watch to still find it running the next morning, and
After repeating this a couple of times I didn’t feel the need to re-set the time.


So, given this watch doesn’t have me reaching for my wallet, what would I change? Not a lot. In a perfect world the date window would sit a little closer to the lume block ‪at three o’clock‬, but that modification to the movement and date wheel inside is unlikely given the price of the watch. I’d therefore personally prefer to see a no-date version to sit alongside this one. Other than that I can’t really find fault.

Thanks for Mike, Bhanu and all at Archimede for the opportunity to spend some time with the watch.
 

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A well considered mini-review there Brad, you have certainly pinpointed the salient, excellent qualities of the Outdoor Antimag very well, indeed, it was the case design and fine finish that I found so very appealing whilst the watch was with me for the Pass Around.

The slightly larger size over the Outdoor Protect worked for me and I would agree with your assessment of the dial, rather prosaic in some respects, but gets the job done without being shouty, perhaps some alternative colours for the dials, as with the Outdoor Protect will give this watch a visual lift. Overall tho', for me, this a fine watch that covers the GADA/Field/tool watch requirement superbly.

Cheers,

Alan

Edit: Oh, I neglected to mention, the photos are excellent Brad.
 

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Great review and pictures. I have been looking at this hard as well as a Guinard.

Thanks for the write up.
 
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