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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
If I'm at the track I'll either wear my Speedy Pro Moonwatch or my Bulova Moonwatch. It's an environment where you'll see any number of high end chronos so, yeah, I'll give you I'm staking out my watch territory there a bit but hey, those guys in the McClarens and Ferraris will walk all over you if you let them. When it comes to Dress watches, I'll go low to high mid priced because again, it's what makes me happy and what I feel fits the moment.
Hat tip. Ain't nothing wrong with that. I like the idea of wearing a moon chrono to the track.
 

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I see it all the time in the forums. "I buy watches for me, I don't care what anyone else thinks." "I don't buy them for the brand recognition, I just appreciate the heritage." "Buy what makes you happy, to hell what everyone says." Like if you admit you care what others think you're betraying either weakness or a lack of authenticity as a WIS.

Now, I'm not denying that people have their own aesthetic preferences or appreciate things like heritage or can admire movement finishing in private while smiling to themselves, but let's be honest here. We are talking in almost all case about JEWELRY that has a certain intellectual appeal because of it's engineering and the expertise that goes into making it clean and intricate and shiny. Social signalling is at least half of the point.

If, say, you're in a corporate environment you're likely either wearing a dress watch or a steel sports watch in part because it confirms a set of expectations of the people around you. If instead you're wearing a Sinn U1 or an orange Monster or something, there's probably still social signalling going on of a different kind. There's lots of subtle signals - conformity (or lack thereof), creativity, status, exclusivity (not quite the same thing as status), practicality, personality... watches as a wearable item are inextricably tied to how we exhibit ourselves to others.

I guess my point is, all of this should be OK. Humans are social animals. If you really, honestly don't care what others think of you, that's likely a sign of sociopathy rather than something to aspire to. And yet, with some rare exceptions people will go to great lengths to avoid admitting that it could be a factor in their watch preferences. Those few people who are open about it, hat tip to you, sir (or madam).
I care. I buy what I like but at a point I know when I look ridiculous. For instance I have a pair of Gucci slippers with fur. I love them, I think they look awesome but I am also very aware I look ridiculous. Maybe if I were famous or super attractive.

I bought them and I wear them around my house, and I thoroughly enjoy owning them but would I wear them out to brunch? Nope.
 

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It's human nature to care about what other people think of you to a certain, healthy point. I work in a public service capacity, so I don't wear my two-tone Rolex DJ to work much. Maybe a couple times a year. I find it to be a little tacky to do so, but then again some might say a two-tone DJ is tacky regardless 😆 Let's just say that I'm more conscious about the clothes, shoes, and watches I wear to work. If I worked on Wall St. or was a Tech Bro, then I wouldn't think twice about any of this.
 

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Again, you don't have to care about what others think to dress well, be clean shaven, or drive a nice car. Some people simply feel more comfortable with themselves when they appear to be the best version of themselves. That's like saying that all guys go to the gym to impress women - sure, some people might think this way, but many more don't.
I also agree with this. I drive nice cars because I genuinely enjoy the feeling of getting in and driving a quality machine. I also like the fact that it gives off an appearance of having my **** together for lack of a better way to put it. Same with dressing nice etc.
 

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But why do you feel more comfortable? Could it possibly be that you're aware, maybe even subconsciously, of the image you convey to the world when you do? How could this possibly be completely independent of an awareness of others' perceptions?
That's a wholly unproductive question to ask. Yes, we are social animals. Everything we do, we do as part of a society. Social animals desire approval from the herd. But you might as well boil everything in life down to desire for calories, dominance, and sex. It might technically be true, but it doesn't resolve any question that's actually worth asking.

The point that people make here is that you should look at your own preferences, interests, and intellectual pursuits for what watch to buy and wear. Of course, those things will be shaped by society. But that's not the same as directly letting others' opinions influence your collection. It's fine if you do that, but it's also not the case that everyone does that.
 

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I'm not quite sure calling people who don't really care what others think of their watches "sociopaths" makes a whole lot of sense, nor is very constructive. These are just watches, and some people don't place the importance of watches all that high in the grand scheme of life (I know I don't)--sure, they enjoy them, they like to talk about them, but, it really just doesn't matter what others think, since in most cases, others simply don't care what kind of watch people are wearing. And, of course, these same people would not necessarily go ballistic if someone actually did comment on their watch--favorably or not--and some of these same folks might be pleased to hear a compliment--despite the fact that they weren't searching for one. I really don't care what others think of my watches, but if someone says something about it, I'll respond pleasantly and see where that goes--a day in the life of a "sociopath", I guess?
 

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Just because we live in a digital world doesn't mean can't think analog. It's not binary. It's not like one has to care all the time or not at all. If none of us cared at all, we wouldn't be posting. We'd lurk at best.

Keep in mind that one can also like nice things because one likes nice things, not because they want to show off. I've not had a friend come up to me yet bragging about their Ermenegildo Zegna briefs.

The reason why I say get what you like and not what people here say is because, why would you care here? Do you see any of the people here in real life? No. You see other people. Since the OPs on this thread don't ask the people physically in their lives, then all that's left is for them to worry about what anonymous people on the internets think, or their own tastes. Left with those two choices, I think it's obvious who they should be listening to.
 

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I think it shows a degree of obliviousness to suggest we don’t care what other people think of our style and consumer sensibility. Wearing a watch is a function of both. This is a society, after all. Of course we care what others think, all the way down to our toothbrush choice. I say this with these three quotes in mind: “No man is an island”, “A man’s got to know his limitations” and “If you see the Buddha walking down the road, kill him”.


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I honestly don't give a Tinker's Cuss what anyone thinks of my stuff. I am retired, and as a BK amputee not very mobile. I don't see many people and my watch, car or anything else are to please myself alone. When I was working I pushed the lower limits of the dress code (and I was not alone in doing so) and I rotated several 5 figure watches. No one cared, or if they did they said nothing. I don't care what their thoughts were. I did very good work for 40 years in the workplace. I cared about what they thought of my work, they were pleased, and I had a successful career and am enjoying my retirement with my 116618LN.
 
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Personally, I might care a little but that doesn’t really lead me to buy or wear a certain watch. I still purchase or wear what “I” truly like. If others like it and complement me on it then that’s great but if they don’t then that’s fine too. I do feel good about myself if I am wearing something with excellent craftsmanship and I also admire it when I look at it. I spend more time looking at the watch design and finishing then looking at the actual time which is probably true for most of us who enjoy this hobby, which tells me that many of us are not wearing it for others.
I only care to the extent that if I am wearing a nice suit, I wouldn’t want to be caught wearing a g shock with it. I would feel uncomfortable as I would feel that I am not appropriately dressed up. It just wouldn’t look right to “my” eye and yes I would feel a little conscious that others might get a laugh at my expense. But there are definitely people out there who don’t care about such things but unfortunately I do care a little about such things.
To be honest, if your assumption was true then everyone would simply buy a Rolex and just wear that. I do think there are plenty of people out there who truly don’t care and that doesn’t make them a sociopath. It’s not like they don’t care about others, they just don’t care what people think of them based on the watch they are wearing. 2 totally different things in my humble opinion.


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There's social norms and expectations in lots of groups. If you were cynical, you'd call it denial and gaslighting.
WIS saying they don't care what others think about their watches is one of them, given we are all over forums discussing watches with others and showing our watches to others. If we didn't care, why would we do this? If we truly didn't care, we wouldn't be active here. I do agree that "buy what you like" is often more a statement the poster wants to communicate about themselves to others than heartfelt advice to the person they are saying it to.

But people get upset when you say things like this - like they are never anything less than 100% genuine and self-aware.
It's similar to how a woman would never admit that she is most attracted to men with lots of money. It's always "kind" or "good sense of humor" because a less-than-genuine answer places them in the best possible light to others and that's what they value more.

Personally, I have no problem saying that the strength of a brand and the perception of a watch plays a role in the watches I choose. It's always a consideration in any expensive watch purchase to me.
 

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There's social norms and expectations in lots of groups. If you were cynical, you'd call it denial and gaslighting.
WIS saying they don't care what others think about their watches is one of them, given we are all over forums discussing watches with others and showing our watches to others. If we didn't care, why would we do this? If we truly didn't care, we wouldn't be active here.
It's similar to how a woman would never admit that she is most attracted to men with lots of money. It's always "kind" or "good sense of humor".

Personally, I have no problem saying that the strength of a brand and the perception of a watch plays a role in the watches I choose.
Wanting to share your enjoyment with others is not the same as letting others influence your choices.
 

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Good cripes a mighty. I buy what I like, and only what I like. Since I'm the guy paying for it, no one else's opinion means diddly to me (no offense to anyone who thinks that he/she is going to make such decisions for me, but you're wasting your time).

The reasons for each purchase are my own, and only my own. If someone likes and appreciates one of my watches, well...great. If someone doesn't care about one of my watches, well....also great. Neither scenario matters in the least to me.
 

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Wanting to share your enjoyment with others is not the same as letting others influence your choices.
When we "share our enjoyment", what we are really looking for is positive affirmation that we made a good choice. Fishing for compliments, so to speak.
The process of our purchase being influenced by others would most likely have occurred several steps prior than what you have described.
 

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When we "share our enjoyment", what we are really looking for is positive affirmation that we made a good choice. Fishing for compliments, so to speak.
The process of our purchase being influenced by others would most likely have occurred several steps prior than what you have described.
Not me, I just want others to know more about the brands I like or warn them about bad experiences.
 

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Of course, those things will be shaped by society. But that's not the same as directly letting others' opinions influence your collection. It's fine if you do that, but it's also not the case that everyone does that.
^ This ^

Being influenced by generally accepted societal norms does not translate to letting others' perceptions dictate what you like.

OP is simplistically conflating these issues, ironically on a forum of enthusiasts more prone to preference contrary to popular opinion, rather than seeking its approval. I buy and wear watches despite--and not because of--others increasingly viewing mechanical watches as old-fashioned or anachronistic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
To be honest, if your assumption was true then everyone would simply buy a Rolex and just wear that. I do think there are plenty of people out there who truly don’t care and that doesn’t make them a sociopath. It’s not like they don’t care about others, they just don’t care what people think of them based on the watch they are wearing. 2 totally different things in my humble opinion.
People seem to be more taken with my word choice rather than what I said. If you behave in a way that is either oblivious or completely disregards others people, that is a sociopathic trait. That's just the truth. I'm not calling people who like watches because they like watches sociopaths. The point is: almost everyone is sensitive to the way they are perceived by others, to varying degrees and to various ends. That's just impossible to avoid, and it's remarkable to me how reluctant people are to admit that it's true.

I've never been a big Rolex guy, as much as I can appreciate why others might like them. Part of that is because the aesthetics of most models don't particularly appeal to me relative to other watches, but part of it is because Rolex is so tied up with status for most people that I just don't want that kind of attention, nor do I want to send the message that I think many people around me will receive from seeing me wear one. So in that regard I suppose I am not attracted to most Rolexes in part because I care about what others think. By the same token I don't go about my day consciously worrying to myself what everyone in the room thinks about my watch or what is says about me.
 

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Wanting to share your enjoyment with others is not the same as letting others influence your choices.
They do sequester juries for a reason.

OP only seems to be saying that he's giving fist bumps to those who aren't doubling down on this notion that they are desert islands unmovable by outside influence, and can admit that somewhere there might be fingers stronger than their own on the scale.

Two pages in and we are already seeing people do just that—getting heated and speaking in absolutes.

I believe that is the invisible force the OP is trying get a pulse on. Unproductive or otherwise.
 
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