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We've all heard stories of Seikos taking a real beating for years, and I was wondering if the 7s26 (or similar) movements were any tougher than the cheaper ETA's such as the 2824-2? I was wondering if the plastic parts in the Seiko movement made them lighter, more shock resistant, etc? Or are the two similar?

Thanks!
 

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We've all heard stories of Seikos taking a real beating for years, and I was wondering if the 7s26 (or similar) movements were any tougher than the cheaper ETA's such as the 2824-2? I was wondering if the plastic parts in the Seiko movement made them lighter, more shock resistant, etc? Or are the two similar?
Thanks!
try a search around the forums "7s26 VS ETA 2824-2" it's a comparison that sometimes came out but some thread are written about this question...

https://www.watchuseek.com/showthread.php?p=1318113
 

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Ive had the date on my seiko malfunction apparently because a plastic piece broke, I've never had a failure on my eta 2824, or 2892s

thanks
 

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We could all give anecdotal evidence for days, but I don't think that would lead us to a definitive answer. Both movements (the ETA 2824 specifically) are well-known for their toughness and shock resistance. Speaking generally, the Seiko should probably be more reliable over the long haul due to it's comparative simplicity. No handwinding or hacking means fewer moving parts that could fail. And running at 21,600 BPM vs. 28,800 BPM means less stress on the movement with each passing second.

Regarding the plastic parts in the Seiko movement, they're used for the calendar mechanism and don't directly affect shock resistance. But most common Seiko divers do use a soft plastic spacer ring between the movement and the case, which provides an extra measure of protection.

For anyone who hasn't read this article, it's a very good breakdown of the 7s26 movement. I've yet to find one on the 2824 that was done this well.

http://www.thepurists.com/watch/features/8ohms/7s26/
 

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We've all heard stories of Seikos taking a real beating for years, and I was wondering if the 7s26 (or similar) movements were any tougher than the cheaper ETA's such as the 2824-2? I was wondering if the plastic parts in the Seiko movement made them lighter, more shock resistant, etc? Or are the two similar?

Thanks!

In my mind a lot of "seiko" predigree comes from price... 7s26 based watches were alwats cheap enough for folks to subject it to all sort of abuse. And reports are indeed that they've survived just about anything that owner can throw at it.

ETA based watches however tend to be more expensive and folks are naturally more reluctant to expose it to daily abuse.

In my opinion this explains the preceved differences. In practice, I doubt that one is particularry better in "shock resistant" department than the other.

Just my 0.02 cents for what it's worth.
 
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It's been said that while the particularly loose tolerances of the 7S26 are factors causing it to generally not be as accurate as a more expensive ETA, the construction does allow it to be a little more shock resistant than a more finely tuned movement.
 

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In my mind a lot of "seiko" predigree comes from price... 7s26 based watches were alwats cheap enough for folks to subject it to all sort of abuse. And reports are indeed that they've survived just about anything that owner can throw at it.

ETA based watches however tend to be more expensive and folks are naturally more reluctant to expose it to daily abuse.

In my opinion this explains the preceved differences. In practice, I doubt that one is particularry better in "shock resistant" department than the other.

Just my 0.02 cents for what it's worth.
I'm with Dukas here, except that I believe as an overall picture, the Seiko is a more resistant movement, simply because of the plastic spacers and fewer moving parts. It's simple mathematics really, or at least logically speaking, seeing as the two are comparable in manufacturers quality.
 

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COrrect me if I'm wrong but don't the 2824's that are Top, or Chrono grade have a different shock protection system than the base, and elabore?
 

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COrrect me if I'm wrong but don't the 2824's that are Top, or Chrono grade have a different shock protection system than the base, and elabore?
Yes, but we have no confirmation that different name brand used for shock protection is actually providing owner with "much better shock protection".

Another problem is that manufacturers rearly (if ever) actually state what grade of ETA is used in particular watch.
 

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I wouldn't say one is better than the other. One reason why you hear stories of old Seikos that have gone a long time without service is because they tended to be inexpensive watches to begin with, and the owners probably thought "why spend money to service a cheap watch?" (I use "cheap" = "inexpensive", not "poorly made"). Comparatively you find older ETAs in higher end Swiss watches for which a service/overhaul represented a smaller fraction of the watch's overall value, so people are willing to pay for it.

I think they are both pretty durable movements. In the few years I've been collecting, I've had one failed 7s26 movement (in a Monster) and one or two 2824-2's which required service (but never stopped completely) because they were running excessively fast or slow.
 

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Had a few of both.

Occasional problems with the ETA.

Never a problem with the 7S26. It is better.
Funny, I have had the exact opposite experience.

But, parts for the ETAs, in general, are easier to get.
 

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Funny, I have had the exact opposite experience.

But, parts for the ETAs, in general, are easier to get.
True but only because folks tend to repair ETA and order parts. When things go wrong with 7s26 folks simply get a whole new movement or possibly even don't even bother with that... watches based on 7s26 are generally so affordable that most people simply get a new watch on those rear ocasions when something DOES go wrong with 7s..
 

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Then explain why parts for all the older Seikos are also difficult to get? And even the higher priced current models.

The 6139 and 6138 were not "cheap and disposable" movements, yet try and find parts for them.

Long term supportability has always been a problem for Seikos, ETA does a much better job at supportability.

Probably the best movement in the world
I don't know about that, one of the better ones, maybe. But, hardly "The Best."
 

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I don't know about that, one of the better ones, maybe. But, hardly "The Best."
Having a value for dollar in mind I don't know of any other watch company that makes automatic movement that can touch them at that price point...
 

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Interesting thread. I recently purchased a O&W ID-3077 which has a ETA 2824-2 movement. I chose this over a Seiko Orange Monster with the 7S26.
I too wondered what the main differences between the two were. Beyond the fact the 2824 has 4 different grades I have no idea how the 2 compare. Am I right in assuming that the Standard 2824 is of direct comparison to the 7S26? As an aside, can anyone point out to me how one identifies the 4 different grades of ETA 2824-2? My O&W runs about +5secs per day faster than my PO, which in itself is pretty much on the money (if not marginally faster) compared with my 2 Quartz powered watches which match each other for timekeeping.
 

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Interesting thread. I recently purchased a O&W ID-3077 which has a ETA 2824-2 movement. I chose this over a Seiko Orange Monster with the 7S26.
I too wondered what the main differences between the two were. Beyond the fact the 2824 has 4 different grades I have no idea how the 2 compare. Am I right in assuming that the Standard 2824 is of direct comparison to the 7S26? As an aside, can anyone point out to me how one identifies the 4 different grades of ETA 2824-2? My O&W runs about +5secs per day faster than my PO, which in itself is pretty much on the money (if not marginally faster) compared with my 2 Quartz powered watches which match each other for timekeeping.
A better comparison to the ETA 2824 would be the Seiko 6r15 (found in the Sumo). They're both hacking, handwinding movements, while the 7s26 does not have these features. The 6r15 is generally more accurate out of the box and is a more consistent timekeeper, allowing for easier regulation.

Regarding the ETA grades - I'm not sure there's any way to know which one is used other than asking the watch manufacturer. Based on the price point, I would assume your O&W uses the standard grade:

Standard (regulated in two positions)
Mean daily rate +/- 12 s/d
Max variation across 5 positions: 30 s
Isochronism (rate after 24H running compared to full wind): +/- 20 s/d

Elaboré (regulated in three positions)
Mean daily rate +/- 7 s/d
Max variation across 5 positions: 20 s
Isochronism: +/- 15 s/d

Top (regulated in five positions)
Mean daily rate +/- 4 s/d
Max variation across 5 positions: 15 s
Isochronism: +/- 10 s/d

Chronomètre (meets COSC specification)
 

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Gabe is correct - the direct comparison would between the 2824-2 and the 6r15. Even so, the 2824-2 is a highbeat 28800bph vs 21600bph for the 6r15, and this matters to some regarding the smoothness of the sweep.
 
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