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Discussion Starter #1
Logic suggests to me that military watches (even vintage ones) should be shock-resistant to some degree considering the conditions they're built to be used in... but can anyone confirm this for me?

The particular kind of watch I'm talking about, Hamilton military issue:

(Image borrowed from Google Images)

 

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How old? Just about anything made after the mid 50s would have a good chance of some shock protection. Look for Incabloc somewhere on the case. American windups from the 40s - not so much.
 

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I have a WWII era material cabinet for one of the popular movements used in military-issued watches(I forget the number). The cabinet I have contains about 20 balance, completes and probably about twice that many balance staffs. The scary thing is that my cabinet is labeled "One quarter set."

I'd say that, based on that, broken balance staffs were simply an expected casualty.

Shock protection is unusual on most any American movement. The American makers seemed to, instead, focus on making balance staff replacement as easy and non-invasive as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hi Ray, thanks for the reply. :)

The one I have is a "replica" of sorts that Hamilton made for Orvis - a Hamilton hack watch with the Orvis logo on the dial - to commemorate Orvis's UK launch in 1982. Apparently it's exactly the same as a Hamilton hack watch, the sole difference being the Orvis logo, so I figured that if the originals have shock resistance, this one should too...? Unless the originals didn't but this 1982 version does...? I don't know.

There is no mention on the case of the watch of it being shock-resistant, but it does say water-resistant.

I decided to ask about the *original* Hamilton military issue watches because not only would I be interested in whether those watches would have been shock resistant, I also, as I said above, would assume that since this watch I have is apparently a Hamilton military issue watch, just released in the early 80s with the Orvis logo, that it's mechanism would probably be the same...?

I wouldn't be surprised if I'm completely wrong about that however! :-d
 

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1982 Swiss made Hamilton? I'd say virtually certain to feature shock resistance. If the original is a WWII American made watch - virtually no chance at all as Ben has pointed out. The 1982 would not have an American made movement since Hamilton ceased US production before 1970. By 1982 shock resistance was so ubiquitous it was unnecessary to say anything about it.
 
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