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I rotate my PO with a number of other pieces and i typically wear it 1 week out of 4.

I dont have a winder, so the P0 stops ticking after a while.

Are there any risks to the movement by letting this happen?

thanks
 

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Just use it once every other week and it'll be fine.
If you're talking about absolute risks, it's the same as any other self-winding watch.
 

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Mine is from 2006 and I rotate it with 5 others. It may go 2 months without being worn

No issue. Just wind it up and go


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You really only need a winder if you have a watch with moon-phase, GMT, annual calendar or perpetual calendar and you don't want to go through the hassle of resetting those function(s), or avoid the possibility of wearing the seals over time from frequent loosening and tightening of the crown. How much of a real issue the latter is, I'm not sure since a regularly serviced watch should be fine.

Keeping your watch off a winder during down time means less use/running and that translates to less wear. But if course you need to reset the time and date every time you rotate it into use - now how worried are you about the seal for the crown?


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My PO is very happy on a winder and I suggest using one. With modern lubricants the use of a winder does not hurt them from what watchmakers tell me. I have 8 watches that live happily on a winder and are ready when I'm ready. Cheers, Bill P.
 

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You really only need a winder if you have a watch with moon-phase, GMT, annual calendar or perpetual calendar and you don't want to go through the hassle of resetting those function(s), or avoid the possibility of wearing the seals over time from frequent loosening and tightening of the crown. How much of a real issue the latter is, I'm not sure since a regularly serviced watch should be fine.

Keeping your watch off a winder during down time means less use/running and that translates to less wear. But if course you need to reset the time and date every time you rotate it into use - now how worried are you about the seal for the crown?


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Keeping them on a winder also moves the lube around correctly.


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Keeping them on a winder also moves the lube around correctly.


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I have seen this "reason" for keeping a watch on a winder stated before. Not sure really what it means, but there is no need to run the watch to "keep lubrication moving" or in the right spot. Lubrication is held in place by capillary action in most locations. Modern synthetic lubricants don't seize up like the old natural oils did - unless you are still using whale oil or porpoise jaw bone oil, this is not really a concern in most cases.

Cheers, Al
 

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A friend of mine's dad was in the watch industry for over 40 years. One of the things he taught me was to always keep the watch wound. You are putting additional and unnecessary stress on the crown every time you tried to wind or adjust with it. Maybe the stress/wear is insignificant, but it adds up over time.

I say just go get a winder. Costco sells decent winders. I got a double winder with adjustable rotation frequency for less than $150. Saved myself some hassle of adjusting the watch every time I want to wear it.
 

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I have seen this "reason" for keeping a watch on a winder stated before. Not sure really what it means, but there is no need to run the watch to "keep lubrication moving" or in the right spot. Lubrication is held in place by capillary action in most locations. Modern synthetic lubricants don't seize up like the old natural oils did - unless you are still using whale oil or porpoise jaw bone oil, this is not really a concern in most cases.


Cheers, Al
Thank you Al,
Your opinion means a lot |>
 

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I have seen this "reason" for keeping a watch on a winder stated before. Not sure really what it means, but there is no need to run the watch to "keep lubrication moving" or in the right spot. Lubrication is held in place by capillary action in most locations. Modern synthetic lubricants don't seize up like the old natural oils did - unless you are still using whale oil or porpoise jaw bone oil, this is not really a concern in most cases.

Cheers, Al

Thanks Al! I was told this from our old friend of the forum...but obviously you're an expert in the field!
 

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I say just go get a winder. Costco sells decent winders. I got a double winder with adjustable rotation frequency for less than $150. Saved myself some hassle of adjusting the watch every time I want to wear it.
Nice to know your watches NEVER gain or lose any time no matter how long they are on the winder - better accuracy than quartz! Wow! My reality has been shaken - I must re-examine all the basic precepts I have held for over 60 years about the accuracy of automatic watches ... either that or you have some magic brand of watch ... or magic brand of winder! The Holy Grail of watches - never again suffer the "hassle of adjusting the watch every time I want to wear it."

:p

o|o|o|
 

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Nice to know your watches NEVER gain or lose any time no matter how long they are on the winder - better accuracy than quartz!
I think his point was that he doesn't have to fix the time and date after not wearing it for a week or three.

My and my wife's autos don't even have date windows, so after they've been idle, it's super-quick to set them to the current time.
 

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I think his point was that he doesn't have to fix the time and date after not wearing it for a week or three.

My and my wife's autos don't even have date windows, so after they've been idle, it's super-quick to set them to the current time.
If he doesn't have to fix the time and date after three weeks ... then it's a miracle! So now, even for months with less than 31 days, his watch somehow (magic?) knows what the date should be and somehow (magic again?) adjusts itself without any manipulation of the crown. Wow!

OK, seriously, MY point is that while a watch is on a winder, the time will drift over time which will require one to adjust the time and/or date when it is taken off the winder - unless one is willing to accept wearing a watch that does not display accurate time or the correct date.

So ... if the rationale for using the winder is to eliminate the "excess wear and tear" on the crown caused by the time setting process, then it is a false premise because the watch will require adjustment whether it has been on a winder or not.

And while we are on the subject of wear and tear, which watch will sustain higher wear - the watch that sits in a watch case for 6 months or the watch that sits on a winder for six months? If anyone still thinks that the watch on the winder will sustain less wear, then just imagine how much wear is on a brand new watch that has sat in its box for months (years?) before it winds up in the owner's hands.
 

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Don't worry, spyderco10 ... I've said my piece. I'll just quietly go away now ...
 

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Nice to know your watches NEVER gain or lose any time no matter how long they are on the winder - better accuracy than quartz! Wow! My reality has been shaken - I must re-examine all the basic precepts I have held for over 60 years about the accuracy of automatic watches ... either that or you have some magic brand of watch ... or magic brand of winder! The Holy Grail of watches - never again suffer the "hassle of adjusting the watch every time I want to wear it."

:p

o|o|o|

I didn't say a winder would save me from EVER adjusting my watch again. If you like pulling out the crown and turning it five times a week, feel free. To each of his own. Like I said before, the wear and tear is probably insignificant. For myself, I only make adjustments to my watches when the date is going from 31 to 30/28/27 (that equates to about 5 times a year). Otherwise, I leave it running. They do gain a couple of minutes, but if that was of any concern, I'd be wearing a quartz like you said.

I would argue that a running watch is better than a stopped one. I am no expert in watch, but I am a car enthusiast. You can drive your car continuously for 15 years. But try parking it for 3 years then drive it again. you'd be lucky to see it starting. All sorts of problems will show up (happened to a few of the cars I owned).
 
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