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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking forward to purchasing a retirement present watch (in ten+ short years time) and I pondered this question. Should I buy a watch that is future proof - i.e. one from a company that I know will in all likelihood still exist in the future for service support of their watches. Or should I buy a watch from a newish manufactuer and hope they are still around to service the watch later in its life. Most manufactures are now focusing on in-house movements so if a watch manufacture goes under will parts for servicing the movement still be available? I know that past performance is no indicator of future existence.

To give you an example, should I focus on buying from a branch such as Jaegar-leCoultre, Vacheron Constantine and the like verses H. Moser & Cie or FP Journe?

Cheers,

M
 

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Like Grouch said, buy what you like.

That being said it depends on the independent. A brand like FP Journe is likely to survive the passing of Mr. Journe. He sold a minority stake to Chanel. Same as Gauthier.

No idea about Moser.

It’ll probably be a pain in the butt to service a watch made by a defunct company, but my guess is that there will be a few master watchmakers who would be able to service independent movements.


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No such thing as future proof.
Just buy what you love.

Even the large brands could go through significant changes in the next 10 years or more.

With regards to ongoing servicing and maintenance though, you will almost always be better off avoiding complicated or unusual movements as even the original manufacturers will likely charge more, or have specialist resources to look after these...


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SOoO many watches, SOoO little time...
 

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well, if you do care about giving your watch to your children as an heirloom, best to stick with the big houses. The only two watches you should consider getting is either a rolex or patek.
 

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Buy what you love.

If you are worried about resale then only buy Rolex - boring. Yawn. Even then this is a tired argument... plenty of mint; box, papers, etc pre owned from many brands with soft second hand prices and then you've already bought at the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Buy what you love.

If you are worried about resale then only buy Rolex - boring. Yawn. Even then this is a tired argument... plenty of mint; box, papers, etc pre owned from many brands with soft second hand prices and then you've already bought at the bottom.
I said nothing about resale. That is not the topic of this discussion and isn't a consideration at all in my future purchase decision.

Cheers,

M

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Hi!

I would say to not take into consideration the serviceability of the movement. Why? First, because you should buy what you love without compromise. Compromising is for vital things, not for a hobby like watches. Second, if the watch is complicated enough to be very specific and the brand disappears, then some high end watchmakers will be able to help, they love the challenge and the craft, and many brands (for example Parmigiani) service old watches and clocks from defunct brands. Honestly, I don't really know how much you plan on spending, but anything below $60k is very unlikely to be a challenge to service in the future (i.e. there aren't many models with super specific or unique escapement, tourbillon cages, or small elements that would not exist anymore).

So, buy what you love, and worry about service later, is my advice. I don't think anyone can tell you what the watch industry will look like in 10 years, but there will always be talented watchmakers by then!

All the best,
A.
 

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Rolex is your safest bet.
As long as you're including non-high end, the lower costing G Shocks are safer. Damn near indestructible and not much money would be lost. Also, like with Rolex, some go up in value. Unlike with Rolex, vitually no servicing ever required.

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Hi!

I would say to not take into consideration the serviceability of the movement. Why? First, because you should buy what you love without compromise. Compromising is for vital things, not for a hobby like watches. Second, if the watch is complicated enough to be very specific and the brand disappears, then some high end watchmakers will be able to help, they love the challenge and the craft, and many brands (for example Parmigiani) service old watches and clocks from defunct brands. Honestly, I don't really know how much you plan on spending, but anything below $60k is very unlikely to be a challenge to service in the future (i.e. there aren't many models with super specific or unique escapement, tourbillon cages, or small elements that would not exist anymore).

So, buy what you love, and worry about service later, is my advice. I don't think anyone can tell you what the watch industry will look like in 10 years, but there will always be talented watchmakers by then!

All the best,
A.
Thanks @ar7iste,

For the considered post. I am not planning on spending anywhere near $60k for the watch. In fact, due to my expected lifestyle post retirement (active outdoors) I might have to even lower my expectations to non precious metals watches and possibly drop out of the high end market to a nice tool watch (e.g something from glashuette original for example). For reference my daily beater for the last dozen years is a Sinn U1000.

Cheers,

M

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No such thing as future proof.
Just buy what you love.

Even the large brands could go through significant changes in the next 10 years or more.

With regards to ongoing servicing and maintenance though, you will almost always be better off avoiding complicated or unusual movements as even the original manufacturers will likely charge more, or have specialist resources to look after these...




SOoO many watches, SOoO little time...
Depending how "futureproof" one feels obliged to be, one may want to eschew integrated-bracelet watches. Yes, many of them have strap options, but if the look of the bracelet is essential in one's mind, a strap may not be an acceptable alternative if the bracelet needs fixing or replacing.

As an RO owner, I don't care that AP offers a strap for it. I don't much like the look of the watch on AP's strap, though I like it better than the Overseas and Connie on straps. That said, if AP goes belly-up, I have no idea of whether I could get a strap if my bracelet goes south.

That AP may go out of business is a risk I was willing to take. There are other makers whereof I am not willing to take the same risk.
 

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I said nothing about resale. That is not the topic of this discussion and isn't a consideration at all in my future purchase decision.

Cheers,

M

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You did not mention resale but the conversation seems to always end up there and that is factually part of the "value" discussion.
 

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Personally I think Rolex is a high-end brand, they simply make more watches than others.

Some of their watches have 5-digit price tags, do you say it's not high-end enough?
 
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