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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good evening all,

I hope all is well?

I have an issue that I can't seem to resolve and I was hoping one of you kind watch Gods would be able to help? I have a really old watch that belonged to my great granddad. It needs repairing and cleaning, the hairspring and mainspring have both failed and the watch hasn't run for years, although it has been locked away in the safe for 30 years so is relatively clean inside. Because t was my great granddads I have decided to have it repaired if possible but I really don't know where to start.

I believe the watch is early 1800s and I can see it is a Argent T13 Piquerez Geneve pocket watch 7460.

Wold someone be able to point me in the direction f where to start?

Photo's attached.

Big thanks in advance.
Regards
MikeyUK
 

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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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Good evening and welcome to Watchuseek! Am I well? It could be better - I have to do a moderate amount of evening overtime these days. Still, it helps pay the rent.....

As for your watch, "early 1800s" seems a little too early. I'd say that it looks more like third quarter of the 19th century. Nevertheless, that makes it old enough. It is a cylindre escapement watch so if the escapement is bent, one will have a hard time getting it into shape again. The hairspring is whacked but it might be salvageable for an expert. The greatest problem seems to be your mainspring. This may well not be bust but the click to prevent it from unwinding as soon as it's wound certainly is. That would need to be replaced or even recreated if parts can't be found (likely in a watch that old!). After that, you'd need at least two new hands and you might as well get all three.

All this will definitely set you back rather more than the watch is realistically worth. If it wasn't a family heirloom, I would advise strongly against it. As it is, you may be willing to spend the cash and for an heirloom, that is perfectly OK. Just ask yourself, whether you would actually use the watch if it was brought back to life - if not, you might as well leave it like that, at least for the moment, and just treasure the memory.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Many thanks for you speedy and intelligent reply Hartmut and I totally hear you about the cost, but the main reason I wanted to get it repaired was just because it was my Granddads and while my father is still alive I was going to give it to him as his 88th birthday, as it was his fathers fathers watch originally. The problem is I really don't know where to start. I have sent a few mails from the excellent list on this forum but I'm wondering if I could get the springs anywhere online, I have purchased another Argent t13 for spares but that wont help me with the springs. There must be somewhere to get replacements but I cant even find the full makes name.

I'm really stuck.

Many thanks again for your thoughts.

best
MikeyUK
 

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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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Please remember that in order to repair a watch movement with parts of another, the two have to be identical or at least very closely related. You are hardly likely to be able to take parts from a Toyota engine and be able to repair a VW engine with them just because both engines are 1.6 litre, 4 cylindre engines! I have never heard of an "Argent T13" calibre. Is it a specific watch movement? Or is it just an inscription on the case? ("Argent" is french for silver so it may just mean that the case is made of silver.....)

Even if you have two identical movements, at that time, the Swiss industry was still far from industrial production so that parts often had to be "adapted" or "finished" before being able to be installed in a new movement since the tolerance limits on production of parts were so great.

Hartmut Richter
 
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