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Attempting to live up to my user name, I decided to try and replicate the walking/arm swing test. I chose this 7S26 powered Seiko 5.




I carried it carefully to the table next to the door and put it on just before starting a brisk 3 mile walk (it took 52 minutes if you feel like doing the pace per mile math). I did not try to swing my arm, or keep it still. Just let it do it’s thing. I checked every half mile or so. It had started running between 1 and 1.5 miles. When I got home I set the time and date (3:21 PM) so I should be able to see how long it runs.


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Due to stay at home policies, and my relatively couch potato existence, I don't get much arm and wrist movement during the day. Yet I've never ever had a watch stop while wearing it. My primary watch - an Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean - has a 70 hour power reserve. Even if I park it on the dresser for 2 days, it's still running when I put it back into the rotation. When work was normal, I would walk about 2 miles per day between buildings. I haven't noticed much difference in the potato mode.
 

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Update: The Seiko stopped after 8 hours. If I can extrapolate that, it would only take 15 miles of walking to fully wind the movement. I'm sure there are a lot of variables to consider, and every watch and walker is different, but I have to say I'm a little surprised at how poorly it does seem walking does at winding a watch, even compared to minimal daily activities.
 

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Update: The Seiko stopped after 8 hours. If I can extrapolate that, it would only take 15 miles of walking to fully wind the movement. I'm sure there are a lot of variables to consider, and every watch and walker is different, but I have to say I'm a little surprised at how poorly it does seem walking does at winding a watch, even compared to minimal daily activities.
Now try driving a car in city traffic for 20 minutes and then check. Better if you wear a watch having Power Reserve dial or indicator for your experiment. Good luck.
 

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Update: The Seiko stopped after 8 hours. If I can extrapolate that, it would only take 15 miles of walking to fully wind the movement. I'm sure there are a lot of variables to consider, and every watch and walker is different, but I have to say I'm a little surprised at how poorly it does seem walking does at winding a watch, even compared to minimal daily activities.
That's actually pretty efficient winding, getting 8hrs from a 1hr walk.

I've had very mixed experiences with auto winding efficiency. I work a desk job, write in my spare time and don't play any sports. I've found that the new Tudor manufacture calibres are terribly inefficient at winding. I used to own a North Flag which let me track the power reserve, and walking did barely anything to get the watch wound. It would actually lose time on my wrist and need to be topped-up once a week or so with some manual winding or going for a run.

By contrast, the older Tudor Black Bays with the modified ETA 2824 stayed wound without issues, and my latest Omega SMP hasn't been hand wound since I bought it and is still ticking away.
 

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Vigorous showering does the trick.
Now debate whether it's okay to wear your watch in the shower.
 

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Now try driving a car in city traffic for 20 minutes and then check. Better if you wear a watch having Power Reserve dial or indicator for your experiment. Good luck.
That would be highly variable. I could see it potentially imparting a decent amount of PR, but it will depend on factors like which wrist you wear your watch on, how many turns you make en route, how you hold the steering wheel, and whether your car has a manual or automatic transmission. My car has a manual gearbox and my watch is worn on my shifting arm, so the act of regularly reaching between steering wheel and shift lever might potentially result in a fair bit of rotor movement.

Also, as with walking, depends on the winding efficiency of the movement. ETA or clones aren't super efficient. Seiko's magic lever is very efficient.
 

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Now try driving a car in city traffic for 20 minutes and then check. Better if you wear a watch having Power Reserve dial or indicator for your experiment. Good luck.
I'm not sure what that would do. My car is pretty high tech these days with automatic transmission, lane watching and cruise control with automatic pacing. I barely need hands or feet to drive :p
 

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This is all very, very interesting! I have a watch which, similar to another post here, I feel like I never had to hand wind, it was just always running. However, I recently had it serviced through an AD and now it feels like it rarely makes it past PR before stopping on my wrist!

For example, it had stopped overnight Friday night, so I fully wound it around 10am Saturday. This Seiko has a 50(ish) PR, so, left entirely to its own devices, it should run until around 12pm Monday. Saturday add Sunday were both fairly active, clocking around 10k steps each day (through a few long walks, forest hike, yard work etc), Monday was more sedentary, only hitting around 5k steps (mostly through a workout, and grocery shopping). The watch died around 17:30 Monday, so all that activity only added approx 5hrs power. I feel as though this never used to be the case!

I’ve been trying to rule out the COVID-sedentary Factor before I head back to the dealer and ask them to check their work...

That movement is a 6R15C. I’ve got an old 6309, doesn’t even hand wind and that thing has NEVER died on me!
 

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I drive my car for 20 minutes from home to office and my JLC Reserve deMarche is fully wound up.
Interesting... do you drive a stick shift? Or maybe a lot of turns?
I generally find that my ~30 minute drive (mostly highway) barely adds anything to my watches. Of course my left hand is barely moving unless I'm making a turn, so it's not all that surprising.
 

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This is all very, very interesting! I have a watch which, similar to another post here, I feel like I never had to hand wind, it was just always running. However, I recently had it serviced through an AD and now it feels like it rarely makes it past PR before stopping on my wrist!

For example, it had stopped overnight Friday night, so I fully wound it around 10am Saturday. This Seiko has a 50(ish) PR, so, left entirely to its own devices, it should run until around 12pm Monday. Saturday add Sunday were both fairly active, clocking around 10k steps each day (through a few long walks, forest hike, yard work etc), Monday was more sedentary, only hitting around 5k steps (mostly through a workout, and grocery shopping). The watch died around 17:30 Monday, so all that activity only added approx 5hrs power. I feel as though this never used to be the case!

I’ve been trying to rule out the COVID-sedentary Factor before I head back to the dealer and ask them to check their work...

That movement is a 6R15C. I’ve got an old 6309, doesn’t even hand wind and that thing has NEVER died on me!
In my experience, when there is a significant degradation in power reserve, say 50%, it is a certainty that it requires a service. Such was the case with an Oris BC3.
 

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I drive my car for 20 minutes from home to office and my JLC Reserve deMarche is fully wound up.
Did it go from stopped (0) to full, or just top off whatever power was consumed overnight?
 

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In my experience, when there is a significant degradation in power reserve, say 50%, it is a certainty that it requires a service. Such was the case with an Oris BC3.
Did you miss the part where this behavior started immediately after the movement was serviced?
 

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In my experience, when there is a significant degradation in power reserve, say 50%, it is a certainty that it requires a service. Such was the case with an Oris BC3.
What if that degradation seems to have happened as a result of a service??!

...MX793 beat me to it!
 

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This is all very, very interesting! I have a watch which, similar to another post here, I feel like I never had to hand wind, it was just always running. However, I recently had it serviced through an AD and now it feels like it rarely makes it past PR before stopping on my wrist!

For example, it had stopped overnight Friday night, so I fully wound it around 10am Saturday. This Seiko has a 50(ish) PR, so, left entirely to its own devices, it should run until around 12pm Monday. Saturday add Sunday were both fairly active, clocking around 10k steps each day (through a few long walks, forest hike, yard work etc), Monday was more sedentary, only hitting around 5k steps (mostly through a workout, and grocery shopping). The watch died around 17:30 Monday, so all that activity only added approx 5hrs power. I feel as though this never used to be the case!

I’ve been trying to rule out the COVID-sedentary Factor before I head back to the dealer and ask them to check their work...

That movement is a 6R15C. I’ve got an old 6309, doesn’t even hand wind and that thing has NEVER died on me!
Did your AD send it to Seiko? If it went to Seiko, they probably replaced the movement rather than servicing the one it had. Even a 6R is cheaper to replace than service. If they replaced it, it's possible that the new movement has a defect with the automatic winding.
 

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What if that degradation seems to have happened as a result of a service??!
I'm not sure what you mean. If the service provider returned a watch that was in worse condition than what was remanded to them for servicing, it would be their obligation to take it back and make it right per the original request and reasonable standard of performance.

In other words, I would insist they fix it. Unless I have concerns about their competence, in which case I'd seek another watchmaker to provide the service.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
Did your AD send it to Seiko? If it went to Seiko, they probably replaced the movement rather than servicing the one it had. Even a 6R is cheaper to replace than service. If they replaced it, it's possible that the new movement has a defect with the automatic winding.
Interesting.

If your watch had a sentimental value and you requested for service, thinking that the AD was going to service it, and your AD, instead of doing the requested work, replaced the movement ... how would you feel ?
 

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Interesting.

If your watch had a sentimental value and you requested for service, thinking that the AD was going to service it, and your AD, instead of doing the requested work, replaced the movement ... how would you feel ?
For "affordable" pieces that use movements that are still in production, this is likely more common than people think. This includes Swiss watches from some of the more entry level brands like Tissot or Hamilton.

Personally, I'm not really bothered by it. Especially with less expensive watches Parts within a movement often need to be changed during service, and once you've replaced a part in the movement, it's not really "all original", is it? So is getting a movement with new springs and some new wheels all that different from getting a new movement? This assumes that the movement is replaced with the same make and model. If I sent a watch with an ETA 2824 in for service and it came back with a cheaper Chinese clone, I'd be upset.
 

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Update: The Seiko stopped after 8 hours. If I can extrapolate that, it would only take 15 miles of walking to fully wind the movement. I'm sure there are a lot of variables to consider, and every watch and walker is different, but I have to say I'm a little surprised at how poorly it does seem walking does at winding a watch, even compared to minimal daily activities.
Thanks for doing this. I’m going to try the same experiment with an NH35, and possibly some others. Provided that I can remember to let them run down.

I have a vague recollection that the NH35 shares a good bit of architecture with the 7S26 (others will hopefully chime in here), so I guess the results should be similar?

Mostly, I’m trying to figure out if I got a bad movement in my new watch. The timegrapher shows it’s well within specs, so it’s probably fine.


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