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Hello all. I read a lot, but rarely post...
I am fixing a NOS Marvin from the 1970s with the AS 2066 movement.
I trashed it when I broke the date changing part (tip: don't try to take it off...), and some other parts, and now I managed to find on the 'bay a NOS movement. So all that will be left of the original movement once I'm done is the rotor with the Marvin logo...

One place where I found difficulty is the friction wheel, or center wheel, or second wheel. In this movement the second wheel is off center, so center wheel is really not the appropriate name. It has one permanent pinion which meshes with the barrel, and another pinion which is pressed in with a little spring and this meshes with the wheels on the bottom plate.

I want to ask how to oil this removable pinion, as after washing, the friction is strong to the point where setting time forward (i.e. turning crown counter-clockwise) is hard enough to unscrew the crown from the stem.

As my movement is New OLD stock, the oils have all dried up and it WILL need cleaning and oiling.

PS I'm a beginning watchmaker and most of my services were done on Seikos (easy for the beginner) where the cannon pinion friction-fits the (true) center wheel and requires less oiling to set the time smoothly.

PS2 I have seen more- and less-complicated day-date mechanisms, but the AS 2066, be its virtues what they be, has an extremely complex system, with many parts and no less than 5 springs. Putting together an ETA date system is child's play next to putting together the AS.

Hoping for answers...

jB
 

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This is my professeur's favourite movt, he said the design was excellent. Anyway, you will need to service the movt, as you say. Don't forget to put some moly lube between the bridle and the barrel wall for slipping of the mainspring, and the slipping wheel must be oiled with a small oiler. You can see that the tiny mechanism is pressed together and cannot be taken apart, so a small amount of oil on the top where there is a circular 'cap' will wick inside and provide the necessary lubrication. It's been awhile since I've done one of these, but all cannon pinions need lube and this one is no different. What is different about these is, they cannot be tightened or adjusted in any way, and if they are worn, must be replaced.
Hope this helps.
 
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