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Hi all,

Was never into auctions or vintage but I decided to bid on this. I wanted to see if I like wearing or owning a vintage watch so big a very small amount and won!
Cant wait to get it. Would like to know more about it if someone can help.

Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Fashion accessory Strap


LONGINES - a gentleman's wrist watch. Gold plated case with stainless steel case back. Numbered 20171921. Signed manual wind calibre L9952 with quick date set. Champagne dial with baton hour markers, date aperture to three. Fitted to an unsigned black leather strap with gold plated pin buckle. 31mm.


 

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That's a very nice watch! The L99x series tooling is now owned by Lemania and used by Breguet et al. as both an ultra-thin automatic and as a base movement for complication modules. It would date from 1977-1987 but the 'TV screen' shape says 1970s to me. It's gold plated because the cost of manufacturing the movement was very high - a solid gold model would have been exponentially more expensive.

I've posted about the calibre before but I'll post again for your convenience:

Introduced in 1977 after two years in the research and development stages, calibre L99x was the last ever automatic movement to be manufactured entirely in-house at the Longines factory in St. Imier and to this day, it remains as what many knowledgeable purists regard as its finest ever product. The last L99x movements left the company in 1987 when it was agreed that they were simply too expensive to manufacture and finish, with the decision being taken to end in-house production and instead build movements around ETA ebauches. The L99x was the final 'real' Longines self-winding movement in the strictest sense of the term and consequently, is of the utmost significance to the collector. It is nothing short of an essential inclusion in any portfolio that attempts to chart the history of this famous brand and it is hardly surprising that an L99x is on permanent public display at the Longines factory museum.

The quality of the L99x was second to none and easily the equal of that of movements by Longines’ most famous competitors. A potential buyer for this calibre does not need to take our word for this statement, and if he studies the movement and compares it to a Rolex automatic mechanism from the same era, the difference in finish standard will be instantly obvious. The Rolex movement will have plain finished bridges and the rotor will be undecorated. Here, the plates and rotor are covered with the most breathtaking set of fine engine turned stripes, these having been applied laboriously using a hand operated ornamental lathe known as a rose engine. Similarly, while the edges of the bridges on both Rolex and Omega movements from this era have been left as right angles, Longines has taken the trouble to give them bevelled edges, again, entirely by hand. Not content to stop there, Longines then proceeded to take the bevelled plate edges and polish each of them, by hand, with diamond paste. The sheer time input that went into every L99x is quite incredible and the more this unit is studied, the more small touches will be noticed that had perhaps been overlooked at first glance. The Longines factory bulletin of 1977 makes the comment that the "components in the L99x are of exceptionally high quality from the point of view of both their dimensions and their finish."

The deeper we delve into the L99x, the more interesting it becomes. We can see immediately that it is a movement of very rare quality, but just how exquisite it is starts to become clear with more research. After Longines ceased in-house production, the tooling for the L99x was purchased by Lemania, who, with some very minor revisions, continued to offer it under its own label as calibre 8810. Today, as of 2012, this same mechanism is the one used in the majority of ultra-high end models by Breguet, the flagship brand of the Swatch Group, which currently owns Longines, Lemania, Omega and Glashutte Original. Quite literally, it is possible to spend several hundred thousand pounds on one of the quarter repeater or perpetual calendar models by Breguet and obtain a watch inside which the movement, albeit modified with additional complications, is based around the L99x; it is the Rolls-Royce of vintage self-winding movements.

There were several versions of the calibre L99x, ranging from the most basic, with 17 jewels, no second hand and no date feature (technically offered as the L994) through to the twenty-five jewelled variants, which was the top of the line. Even the most basic of the L99x series was exceptional, and all offered high accuracy running speed of 28,800 half beats per hour, Kif Flex shock protection and anti-magnetic shielding.
 
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bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: Longines 994.1

Have a look here, looks in good shape. I think yours is manual wind, probably dates from late 1970s-early 1980s.

Yep. 995 is manual wind. Nice movements, as TimeWizard states in much better detail below. I have a few of the autos because they usually can be found for a great price in good condition, as they don't seem to be too popular with collectors. Nice quality for the price if you don't mind some kind of generic 70's-80's look to the cases.
 
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