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Aurora watch company made pocket watches for short time and later was purchased by Columbus watch company and was renamed to Hamilton.

They are not considered high end but 19th century American key wind watches just have something to make me sweat :D

Model 1 movement from around 1885.
Total weight with case some whopping 190 g / 0.42 lbs




What got my eye was the key attached near the T-bar because it is of a wrong size for the movement.
But after some time I got a strike to understand how is that used! :D


Step 1. We have a T-bar and a key on their personal sub-chains.





Step 2. We push the T-bar through the key loop.





Step 3. When done all the way though -> we a perfect secure loop.



 

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Even if it is summer it is not a good idea to buy awatch which cool you down :). I can't "read" the american full plate movements but to me the quality seems to be good. All wheel bears in jewels who are in chatons for fine adjustment, a compensation balance with a powerful blue flat spiral and a nice microregulation system for their length. I just bother the dirt but in all other points I understand your fable.

Regards Silke
 

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It appears the incorporation name of Hamilton was the Colombian Watch Co, not Columbus Watch Company. Gruen founded Columbus in Columbus (Ohio). Different company.

This is a darn good watch for 1885!
 
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Aurora watch company made pocket watches for short time and later was purchased by Columbus watch company and was renamed to Hamilton.
It's not quite that simple. There is considerable confusion about the admittedly complex relationship between Aurora and Hamilton. One very well-known book even says that Hamilton purchased Aurora on June 19,1890. This is impossible inasmuch as Hamilton did not exist at the time. (The founders of Hamilton filed for incorporation on November 18, 1892, and certification was not granted until December 14, 1892.)

The fact is that while Hamilton did not own or operate Aurora, some of the same people were involved with both. Aurora operated in Aurora, IL from 1883 to 1891. The company was bought out by Charles Rood and Henry Cain in August, 1890 and they continued to finish up movements from existing parts. Rood and Cain also bought the remains of the defunct Lancaster Watch Company, which occupied the building that Hamilton later acquired for its factory. Rood and Cain later went on to team up with several other investors to establish the Hamilton Watch Company in 1892. They moved some 300 lathes and other machinery from the then-defunct Aurora factory to Lancaster to equip the new Hamilton factory. Many of the former key employees of Aurora also moved to Pennsylvania to help start up the Hamilton company, and many of the Lancaster Watch Company's machines and employees also moved over to Hamilton. Cain, who had been a mechanical engineer at Aurora, used some of his concepts in designing the new Hamilton grade 936 and related movements. This process took nearly a full year and as a result Hamilton did not produce its first watch until November 25, 1893.

Consequently the relationship between the two companies is tenuous. The Aurora machinery and some employees were a key factor in setting up Hamilton, but there was never a direct corporate connection. Hamilton today has no documents regarding Aurora since the company only took over old equipment, not the business.
 

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It's not quite that simple. There is considerable confusion about the admittedly complex relationship between Aurora and Hamilton. One very well-known book even says that Hamilton purchased Aurora on June 19,1890. This is impossible inasmuch as Hamilton did not exist at the time. (The founders of Hamilton filed for incorporation on November 18, 1892, and certification was not granted until December 14, 1892.)

The fact is that while Hamilton did not own or operate Aurora, some of the same people were involved with both. Aurora operated in Aurora, IL from 1883 to 1891. The company was bought out by Charles Rood and Henry Cain in August, 1890 and they continued to finish up movements from existing parts. Rood and Cain also bought the remains of the defunct Lancaster Watch Company, which occupied the building that Hamilton later acquired for its factory. Rood and Cain later went on to team up with several other investors to establish the Hamilton Watch Company in 1892. They moved some 300 lathes and other machinery from the then-defunct Aurora factory to Lancaster to equip the new Hamilton factory. Many of the former key employees of Aurora also moved to Pennsylvania to help start up the Hamilton company, and many of the Lancaster Watch Company's machines and employees also moved over to Hamilton. Cain, who had been a mechanical engineer at Aurora, used some of his concepts in designing the new Hamilton grade 936 and related movements. This process took nearly a full year and as a result Hamilton did not produce its first watch until November 25, 1893.

Consequently the relationship between the two companies is tenuous. The Aurora machinery and some employees were a key factor in setting up Hamilton, but there was never a direct corporate connection. Hamilton today has no documents regarding Aurora since the company only took over old equipment, not the business.
Thanks HamiltonElectric, interesting reading.
 
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