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So my Seafighter ( as well as my Enzo Mechana and Sinn) have automatic movement with the manual winding option. I understand I can wind it (clockwise right?) from a dead stop. But I have never done this... I usually pick up the watch and just shake it side to side to get it going, a minute or so later I adjust the time and date. Is this wrong? am I damaging the watch somehow or will the watch just run faster/slower becasue of it?

also I read somewhere that adjusting the day and/or date between 8pm and 4am can damage the watch. Is this true?

:think:

Thanks guys

-Ryan
 

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So my Seafighter ( as well as my Enzo Mechana and Sinn) have automatic movement with the manual winding option. I understand I can wind it (clockwise right?) from a dead stop. But I have never done this... I usually pick up the watch and just shake it side to side to get it going, a minute or so later I adjust the time and date. Is this wrong? am I damaging the watch somehow or will the watch just run faster/slower becasue of it?

also I read somewhere that adjusting the day and/or date between 8pm and 4am can damage the watch. Is this true?

:think:

Thanks guys

-Ryan
Nothing wrong with shaking it, that's actually probably the best way, so that you don't put any undue wear on the crown. Personally, I like to give my watches a full wind every morning (only the one I wear of course). The fuller the wind, the more accurate your watch is going to run. Either way you should be fine.

As for the second part, it can. The date is changing gradually during those times and to adjust either the time or day/date during those times would be messing with the natural rotation they're going through. That's not to say that it will happen, nor have I ever had the experience with it happening, but it could, and that's enough for me not to mess with it.
 

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You won't damage the watch by winding it (you can't overwind it either), but shaking it achieves the same purpose.
I read a post recently in which the poster claimed that manually winding automatics does damage to the movement. Honestly I give your response more weight since you're a mod (and have the power to do mean stuff to a lowly poster such as myself) but mostly because you've been around longer and sound knowledgeable. Could you briefly explain why it's alright since I'm running out of winder space and like to keep them all ticking all the time.
 

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I read a post recently in which the poster claimed that manually winding automatics does damage to the movement. Honestly I give your response more weight since you're a mod (and have the power to do mean stuff to a lowly poster such as myself) but mostly because you've been around longer and sound knowledgeable. Could you briefly explain why it's alright since I'm running out of winder space and like to keep them all ticking all the time.
The argument for not handwinding an automatic is mostly that unscrewing the crown to wind it can wear the threads of the crown out over time. While this is true, "over time" in this case would probably mean decades for people with large collections who don't wear the same watch everyday. It is also a myth that it is better to keep watches running all the time. Simply put, if they are not running, they also don't wear out! Modern oils in watches don't wear out from sitting around, so feel free to let your watches wind down and sit motionless for a month or more. If anything, I think winders wear watches out more, since it keeps them running all the time. If one adheres to the 5-year interval of servicing the movement, you'll have to get those watches serviced in 5 years whether you wear them or not. If you let them wind down, it might be decades before they need attention.

I had a winder in the past, but just didn't see the need to run a watch unnecessarily. Also, the argument of not wearing out the crown did not hold true for me since I like to set the watch to atomic time before I wear it for the day, so I'll need to unscrew the crown anyways.

Oh and by the way, I'm a WIS just like everyone else here. I don't put on the "mod" hat unless I have to, and even then I would never take action because someone disagrees with me - only when they are being rude or violate the rules, then I might do something to prevent a conflict between members.
 

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The argument for not handwinding an automatic is mostly that unscrewing the crown to wind it can wear the threads of the crown out over time. While this is true, "over time" in this case would probably mean decades for people with large collections who don't wear the same watch everyday. It is also a myth that it is better to keep watches running all the time. Simply put, if they are not running, they also don't wear out! Modern oils in watches don't wear out from sitting around, so feel free to let your watches wind down and sit motionless for a month or more. If anything, I think winders wear watches out more, since it keeps them running all the time. If one adheres to the 5-year interval of servicing the movement, you'll have to get those watches serviced in 5 years whether you wear them or not. If you let them wind down, it might be decades before they need attention.

I had a winder in the past, but just didn't see the need to run a watch unnecessarily. Also, the argument of not wearing out the crown did not hold true for me since I like to set the watch to atomic time before I wear it for the day, so I'll need to unscrew the crown anyways.

Oh and by the way, I'm a WIS just like everyone else here. I don't put on the "mod" hat unless I have to, and even then I would never take action because someone disagrees with me - only when they are being rude or violate the rules, then I might do something to prevent a conflict between members.
You are 100% correct - keeping a watch wound all the time does more harm than letting it wind down. When you want to wear it, pull out or unscrew the crown, set time and date and shake and wind crown if you want. Think of a cars engine - if it is running all the time the sooner you have to have the oil changed and service other things - same for a watches movement. I only have one winder, I use it to check accuracy when I want. BUCK:-!
 

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Thanks for the replies gents. I guess I can give the watches a rest now.

I suppose I should have used a smiley with my little aside to you Eric - I was joking about you doing something mean, although not about your informational posts.
 

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Thanks for the replies gents. I guess I can give the watches a rest now.

I suppose I should have used a smiley with my little aside to you Eric - I was joking about you doing something mean, although not about your informational posts.
Just for that, I'm going to have to think up some mean stuff to do! ;-):-d

Thanks for the props - I try to be useful, mostly, in between my other rambling posts!
 

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Personally I never manually wind an automatic watch (anymore). I now shake it for a few seconds to get it going, set the time (making sure not to adjust the date if the time is anywhere near 12 o'clock) and then wear it. I move around enough and have never had any problems with the watch stopping, even if I were to take it off at night.

I have also read that it can be bad to manually wind an automatic watch. Something about winding with the crown spins some gear much faster than it would if being wound by the rotor. I don't recall where I read that, although I could certainly believe that's possible. I do know that I ruined two cheap automatic watches when I first got into this hobby a few years back. I would always manually wind my watch every morning and wasn't terribly gentle. I had heard that it was impossible to overwind an automatic watch. Both watch still run just fine, but if I try to manually wind them they make a horrible grinding noise. Something sure got damaged.

I also know it's possible to strip the threads on a screw down crown - another reason for not always winding an automatic watch. Granted, I do have two manual wind watches with screw down crowns and I'm always concerned that I'll end up damaging those threads before too long.
 

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I agree with Eric on the use of screwed crowns. It's logical that yes, any use of it is putting wear on it, but the likelihood that it'll have any negative affect (as long as you're careful when screwing it back down) is so low that it's really a pointless argument. I didn't mean for my comment to sound like I was saying anything different, just going with logic and since it really doesn't matter whether or not you shake or whether or not you hand-wind, I just stick with recommending shaking, seeing as that's what you're already doing.
 
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