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Hey battery-change experts,

How tight do you tighten the back cover screws? I have a couple of battery changes I've just done, but I am waiting on silicone oil before I seal back up. I'm just not sure how tight I should tighten the screws when I do. I want to make sure I seal properly without going so tight I end up stripping fragile plastic threads.

Thanks!
 

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This is like of of those things you just don't want to think about when it comes to a watch you like. I have a few watches that I gave up trying to get new battery for at the jewelry store again and again. I just got like 6 watches now that I rotate, and that I keep as a backup for a backup now. And, any watch I have to change the battery for will have to be less than $50 for, and not worry about it if something happens to it replacing the battery. The way I look at it. Every time I change a cheap watch's battery. I can always get another one just in case the seal fails after I replace the battery. And, if it didn't. I guess I have another watch. :)
 

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There's no need to tighten the screws more than just finger tight - you won't make the watch any more watertight. The crucial thing is to get the screw started properly in its original thread - get a screwdriver which fits the Philips-head really well, and then get the screw completely vertical in its hole and very gently turn it, with no pressure - the screw thread should just drop into the original thread in the resin, and you should feel almost no resistance to turning - if you do feel resistance, stop, back out the screw and very gently start again. Once the screw is in it's thread sweetly, it will turn easily until you get right to the end, when it will tighten up a little (as it compresses the gasket) and then stop. So long as you just nip up the screw to tightness you've done enough - it won't come undone of its own accord, and forcing the screw tighter won't compress the O-ring gasket any more.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks! That gives me some tactile guidance. It's hard to tell exactly what someone means by 'just enough' or 'finger tight'.
There's no need to tighten the screws more than just finger tight - you won't make the watch any more watertight. The crucial thing is to get the screw started properly in its original thread - get a screwdriver which fits the Philips-head really well, and then get the screw completely vertical in its hole and very gently turn it, with no pressure - the screw thread should just drop into the original thread in the resin, and you should feel almost no resistance to turning - if you do feel resistance, stop, back out the screw and very gently start again. Once the screw is in it's thread sweetly, it will turn easily until you get right to the end, when it will tighten up a little (as it compresses the gasket) and then stop. So long as you just nip up the screw to tightness you've done enough - it won't come undone of its own accord, and forcing the screw tighter won't compress the O-ring gasket any more.
 

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Just a reminder for those who rather have a shop open/close their watches: a professional shop is NOT a guarantee that you will have your watch properly opened and closed.
If you're not going to take the watch to an AD, I say do it yourself.
 

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Just a reminder for those who rather have a shop open/close their watches: a professional shop is NOT a guarantee that you will have your watch properly opened and closed.
If you're not going to take the watch to an AD, I say do it yourself.
I wouldn't let a "professional" near my Gs. Why pay someone else to screw it up. If you have a rare G and want to make sure it's right, buy some cheap beat-up G's off ebay and practice. Otherwise, just do it.

I'm sure there are some competent and trustworthy jewelers out there who do fine work. But, twice I dropped off one of my old 5600C, paid what the watch originally cost, and got back a watch that flooded the first time I jumped in a pool. One guy was supposedly a dive watch specialist and was going to pressure test it. Yeah right, he chopped the gasket with the screwback when he put it on. I found part of it inside the watch cut off. The second guy was a Rolex specialist in the area. He came recommended by some Rolex guys. He put it back together without the gasket. I'm pretty sure he meant to order a new gasket and put it in, but didn't as the back was not on very tight either. To his credit, that guy actually refunded my money and apologized. He might have been a reasonable repairman, but not very thorough/organized. Each guy took over a week with the watch (and were authorized Casio dealers BTW). Luckily the DW-5600C was robust and handled getting flooded twice. Also, both of these guys put batteries in that lasted less than a year. I suppose it's possible the flooding had something to do with it, but I doubt it. Cheap k-mart batteries usually lasted about 2 years in the same watch when I did it myself (older technology back then). In a pinch I had a watch Kiosk do it once and he did a fine job on the spot and only charged a few bucks.
As a scuba diver, I wanted to be sure my watch wouldn't flood in 100ft so I took it to pros. But, both times it flooded in 2ft. I fixed it myself and it was fine to 100ft. Never again, do it yourself.
 

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If your even moderately competent with hand tools you are better off doing this kind of work on your own watches. You care alot more about your watch than anyone else and will do a better job. Like stpete said "buy some cheap beat-up G's and practice". After I close one up the first thing I do is drop it in a bucket of water for awhile then set it in front of the exhaust fan on my computer to warm it up, then stick it in the freezer for awhile. I know for sure after those tests that I did the job right and I havent had one fail yet. I'm not too worried about pressure tests as I dont dive. I figure that if I'm ever 600 ft deep I wont be looking at my watch.
 

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Why pay someone else to screw it up.
I'm also partial to do my own screwing-up :-d. At least you have the opportunity to learn from it.

With autos I have been lucky so far, but I have to ship my watches to a different state to get them serviced at a shop that I trust. The only quartz incident that I have was with my first G, a 5300 (I think) that flooded after a battery change at a Casio AD.
 

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Never try to force the screw too tight. Just turn the screwdriver gently until the screw stops moving, then a gentle quarter (or even 1/8th) turn.

To prevent cross threading when starting the screw:
1. insert screw in hole
2. make sure screw is vertical.
3. VERY gently (ie NO downward pressure) turn the screw counter clockwise. If you do it right you can feel the screw "click" as it seats itself in the threads.
4.Now you can turn the screw clockwise to tighten.

Finally, always tighten screws down in a cross pattern, with the final quarter(or 1/8th) turn done in cross pattern.
 
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