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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, last question about my new Ball watch until at least 2011! How tight should I be tightening the crown? There seems to be a stopping point, but I'm wondering if it's not tight enough water could easily seep into the opening. Maybe it is because the watch is new, but if feels as if the crown is grinding into something. Not a very smooth feeling.
Thanks again to all the helpful replies in this forum so far!
 

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Not wanting to be to abrupt, should be a bit obvious. Turn it untill its tight, you mention there seems to be a stopping point, sounds about right. If it is responding with some sort of grind/resistance as your screwing it in, very well may be something wrong. If so taken for a look.
 

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Generally go until it starts to feel tight and stop.
 

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If the crown doesn't catch the tube's threads at first attempt, do not force, turn the crown back and forth slightly until it engages and turns clockwise smoothly , go slowly until you feel the resistance when it touches the case, at this point apply a last turn with a small amount of torque and you're done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
If the crown doesn't catch the tube's threads at first attempt, do not force, turn the crown back and forth slightly until it engages and turns clockwise smoothly , go slowly until you feel the resistance when it touches the case, at this point apply a last turn with a small amount of torque and you're done.
Based on Ivt above, I tested this a few times and it seems I was twisting until it completely stopped, which was after the crown touched the case. I now noticed that I have some marking on the case from the crown. (upon further inspection it was not an abrasion, some sort of dust/ grease?) Is this normal, or was I turning too far? It seems like the average person wouldn't stop until the crown stops turning.

Anyone bored out there with a Night Train care to test this out? Are you turning crown until you feel it stop?
 

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I just slowly tighten until I feel resistance, get it snug and stop. I do pretty much as lvt has suggested. There is no wear showing against the case of my Night Train or Fireman B&O.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The one thing I don't see noted is that no one is tightening until it stops. I see a pattern here! Makes sense though that Ball would allow the crown to be screwed in fully without any possible damage to the case, no?
 

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Most likely what you are feeling is the seating of the gasket. Mine is smooth but it has been used for three years. One trick that some people use on other brands of watches is to take and wrap wrap dental floss around the threads to clean them by going back and forth. This generally does the trick.
 

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My Ball CE's case has a rounded "landing zone" for the crown so no way I could scratch or create marks on the case.

There might be a small amount of grease on the tube (applied in factory to make the threads smoother), to clean the grease on the tube when it catches too much dust, simply use Rodico to slowly remove them, never use coton tige or you will end up with a tube covered with coton lint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My Ball CE's case has a rounded "landing zone" for the crown so no way I could scratch or create marks on the case.

There might be a small amount of grease on the tube (applied in factory to make the threads smoother), to clean the grease on the tube when it catches too much dust, simply use Rodico to slowly remove them, never use coton tige or you will end up with a tube covered with coton lint.
Ivt...I don't think my Night Train has this landing zone. This is a bit frustrating as I've used a mag. glass today and can confirm that if I screw the crown in until it stops, there is some sort of minor marking on the case. Again, this will come off if I use a eyeglass cleaning cloth. I can repeat this over and over. You're initial response above makes the most sense of stopping 1/4 turn after it touches the case, but it makes more sense to me that I should be able to fully close the crown (as I assume most people would do without thinking twice). I'll drop Ball USA a line Monday and get more clarification. I don't want to damage the DLC coating on this brand new watch or fail to close the crown enough and have water damage.
 

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OK, last question about my new Ball watch until at least 2011! How tight should I be tightening the crown? There seems to be a stopping point, but I'm wondering if it's not tight enough water could easily seep into the opening. Maybe it is because the watch is new, but if feels as if the crown is grinding into something. Not a very smooth feeling.
Thanks again to all the helpful replies in this forum so far!
Flag, use a 10X or stronger jewelers loupe, not just a mag glass and take a good close look at the crown. Let something hold the loupe for you so you can use both hands on the watch to work the crown. I have a first gen NT with the blue tubes and the original wording on the dial and I just looked for myself. You will see a tube with outside threads protruding from the case. This tube is stationary. The crown is threaded on the inside. These are the threads you do not want to cross when you close the crown. These threads usually have a light lubricant on them that may wash away over time. Pulling waxed dental floss across the outside threads can remove debris and in my opinion possibly re-lubricate them. Inside the crown is a gasket you cannot see. This gasket is compressed against the end of the outside threaded tube as you close the crown. My watch received fresh gasket and seals this year so they are still full thickness. When I close my crown to the point it feels snug and tight the crown does not strike the case. Generally, if a crown strikes the case it is being unnecessarily over tightened or the gasket inside the crown has become compressed and is too thin. IF IF the crown of a watch is supposed to strike and rest against the case, and some do, then that watch uses a different sealing system, usually O-rings, like what is used with non-screw-down crowns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Chuck...I suppose the bottom line is that I can see with my naked eye that if I fully close the crown, it is most certainly rubbing on the case at one point. As a self admitted OCD person, this bothers me bc you assume you can shut it all the way. It will be interesting to see what Ball says Monday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was able to get in touch with the main Ball office in Switzerland this morning. (USA office was closed) Spoke with a very helpful Kevin at length about this issue and he reiterated a couple of things...1) The crown MUST be fully closed in order to get full water resistance 2) It is normal for the crown to touch the case in the above instance 3) Not unusual for there to be a mark. His point was that bc it is meant to touch the case, there may be a mark over time and that it doesn't really matter bc you won't see this when the crown is closed. A bit odd, but he's right I suppose. Any thoughts on this?
 

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I gotta call bs on this one. If the crown strikes the case you don't know if it has compressed the gasket before it stops.

(edited for spelling)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Chuck,
Are you saying that bc you should be closing the gasket before it strikes the case? Therefore not requiring you to fully close the crown?
 

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I am saying what I have already said. If the crown spins right up to the case and jambs/stops without feeling resistance from compressing the gasket you don't know if you have a seal. With a nice fresh thick gasket the crown will tighten and stop before it strikes the case. You could continue cranking the sh*t out of it until it does reach the case but all that will do is compress the gasket more than it needed to be and shorten the life span of it. NEW gaskets and NEW seals are CHEAP insurance against water intrusion. If you have doubts REPLACE them. It isn't expensive, and it is surely costs less than what you will pay to have the movement taken apart, dried, cleaned, lubricated, assembled, new gaskets anyway, etc!!

Disclaimer: All of this I have said applies ONLY to the Ball Fireman Night Train that I own. Other watches may very.:)
 

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I am saying what I have already said. If the crown spins right up to the case and jambs/stops without feeling resistance from compressing the gasket you don't know if you have a seal. With a nice fresh thick gasket the crown will tighten and stop before it strikes the case. You could continue cranking the sh*t out of it until it does reach the case but all that will do is compress the gasket more than it needed to be and shorten the life span of it. NEW gaskets and NEW seals are CHEAP insurance against water intrusion. If you have doubts REPLACE them. It isn't expensive, and it is surely costs less than what you will pay to have the movement taken apart, dried, cleaned, lubricated, assembled, new gaskets anyway, etc!!

Disclaimer: All of this I have said applies ONLY to the Ball Fireman Night Train that I own. Other watches may very.:)
Just bought a new night train (v3) and the crown is definately hitting the case - it does feel like the only reason the crown will not screw any further is that it is too tight against the case - not a gasket.

I dont have a loupe yet, but I'm sure it will leave a mark on the case - now from reading the above, I'm unsure as to whether it has a fully functional gaskey system in place - so will keep it away from water until Ball check it out.

Update: it leaves a residue on the case, possible the crown metal is softer than the dlc, so leaving a thin film from the wear. In no way am I turning the "sh*t" out of the crown, it only feels resistance when it hits the case.
 

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Here is what mine looks like screwed in. It stops right here and I see no mark.

 

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It is certainly possible the gasket system has changed from Gen1to Gen3. Ball has changed the system on the Diver line.
 

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Mine is a gen 3 and I see no difference between it and my Fireman II. Both I just screw until they stop. The NT has been swimming this way with no issues.
 
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