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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a GW-300 a few years ago. It worked really fine for a while. Then I put it in storage for a couple of years. I just took it out the other day to start wearing it again. I wore it outside it in the sun for an hour. So I set the time (yesterday) and turned off the receiver (to protect the low charge). I wore it in the sun again today for about an hour. It is still on "low" charge and I can't even use any button within the time mode (such as light or mode change) other than the Adjust button.

If I take it into Adjust mode, THEN the Mode button does work to navigate around the dial to set everything. But the button doesn't work in main mode.

What a shame. Do all of them have this problem after a while? I really like this model and the fact that it was cheaper than most solar/atomic models. I don't even care about the atomic feature, but I did like the solar. But I can't believe that it has quit working after two total hours of sunlight which it seems like should have taken it to a full charge, or at least medium charge.

I don't want to buy another of this model, even though I like the design. Now I'm even hesitant about all their solar models. But I would not mind trying another less expensive solar GShock and finding out the best way to "condition" the battery, assuming that the battery needed some kind of special conditioning.

Thanks for any information or recommendations.
 

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There are multiple answers to your problem:

1) Two hours is NOT enough time to fully recharge your watch's battery. Here's the charging chart from the manual located at http://support.casio.com/storage/en/manual/pdf/EN/009/qw2608.pdf

gw-300 charging.png


2) The rechargeable batteries used in all of Casio's solar-powered models do not do well when they're put in storage for long periods. For best life, they need to be kept fully charged (or at least on "medium.") When they drain to "low" or below, and remain that way for months, they may not hold a full charge again.

3) As noted in many threads around "f17," a lot of Casio's earliest solar watches seemed to have problems with their battery life, possibly due to the battery manufacturer. It's a relatively common complaint with the GW-300, unfortunately. Casio did address the issue and fix the problem, which doesn't seem to affect most of their later solar or solar/atomic models. (I know, it's a small consolation for the "early adopters" to have been "beta testing" and discovering some of these problems so Casio could fix them for future customers, but as has been noted before, that's a side effect OF the "early adopter" experience.)

Your EASIEST and first solution should probably be to place your watch outside in the sun, with the display (and solar panel) facing the sun for maximum efficiency, for 18 hours or two days. That should hopefully bring the battery back to a full charge. If you have to place it on a sunny windowsill instead, as the chart shows, that's going to mean leaving it there for 87 hours to get it all the way to "full."

These batteries have a large reserve -- enough that they can operate in total darkness for months at a time -- but the solar panel itself is usually smaller than a dime, which is spread out around the dial of the watch. That means they take a LONG TIME to charge, but a relatively long time to drain.

If that doesn't work, you can always replace the battery WITH AN IDENTICAL RECHARGEABLE BATTERY. As long as the charge in the new one is maintained, you should get ten or twenty years of trouble-free operation from it. There are at least three "how to" threads in the Articles and Tutorials section of this forum, or any qualified watch repair shop should be able to change the battery for a fee. Just make sure they know how to work on Casio watches, not lose the multiple small springs inside, and replace it with a RECHARGEABLE battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There are multiple answers to your problem:

1) Two hours is NOT enough time to fully recharge your watch's battery. Here's the charging chart from the manual located at http://support.casio.com/storage/en/manual/pdf/EN/009/qw2608.pdf


View attachment 4021874


2) The rechargeable batteries used in all of Casio's solar-powered models do not do well when they're put in storage for long periods. For best life, they need to be kept fully charged (or at least on "medium.") When they drain to "low" or below, and remain that way for months, they may not hold a full charge again.

3) As noted in many threads around "f17," a lot of Casio's earliest solar watches seemed to have problems with their battery life, possibly due to the battery manufacturer. It's a relatively common complaint with the GW-300, unfortunately. Casio did address the issue and fix the problem, which doesn't seem to affect most of their later solar or solar/atomic models. (I know, it's a small consolation for the "early adopters" to have been "beta testing" and discovering some of these problems so Casio could fix them for future customers, but as has been noted before, that's a side effect OF the "early adopter" experience.)

Your EASIEST and first solution should probably be to place your watch outside in the sun, with the display (and solar panel) facing the sun for maximum efficiency, for 18 hours or two days. That should hopefully bring the battery back to a full charge. If you have to place it on a sunny windowsill instead, as the chart shows, that's going to mean leaving it there for 87 hours to get it all the way to "full."

These batteries have a large reserve -- enough that they can operate in total darkness for months at a time -- but the solar panel itself is usually smaller than a dime, which is spread out around the dial of the watch. That means they take a LONG TIME to charge, but a relatively long time to drain.

If that doesn't work, you can always replace the battery WITH AN IDENTICAL RECHARGEABLE BATTERY. As long as the charge in the new one is maintained, you should get ten or twenty years of trouble-free operation from it. There are at least three "how to" threads in the Articles and Tutorials section of this forum, or any qualified watch repair shop should be able to change the battery for a fee. Just make sure they know how to work on Casio watches, not lose the multiple small springs inside, and replace it with a RECHARGEABLE battery.
Thanks. I might have been confusing it with a Citizen dive watch I had that didn't require as much sunlight to charge. I will keep trying.
 

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If it has been in storage for years, it will take days to recharge and build up a reserve if you are lucky. If not lucky then a new CTL-1616 may be in your future.
 

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I had a Casio first generation solar watch in storage for years, if my memory serve me correct, it was in storage for close to 7 years, the watch was completely dead, i had to leave it under the sun for a few days on a bright day to bring it back to life, a few hours ain't gonna fully charge it.
 

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the G and its battery is fine, 99% sure, just leave it behind your window glass for a week and it will be on duty
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Back in business with a Medium level charge!

I estimate it took 3 hours of outdoor sunlight, plus around 12 hours inside near a window, partially cloudy.

Now I'm wondering how long it should take to get from medium to high. Or if I should even worry since everything works on it now.
 

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Look at the chart in Mike K's post to show how long it will take to "top off".


Back in business with a Medium level charge!

I estimate it took 3 hours of outdoor sunlight, plus around 12 hours inside near a window, partially cloudy.

Now I'm wondering how long it should take to get from medium to high. Or if I should even worry since everything works on it now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Look at the chart in Mike K's post to show how long it will take to "top off".
I looked at the chart but I could only get a vague idea.
Which is the high level, 4 or 1? It's difficult to read that chart.
Will it take even longer to get to the next level?
 

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I looked at the chart but I could only get a vague idea.
Which is the high level, 4 or 1? It's difficult to read that chart.
The various charge levels are explained in the manual that I linked in post #3. Here's the link again: http://support.casio.com/storage/en/manual/pdf/EN/009/qw2608.pdf

Will it take even longer to get to the next level?
Yes. Your watch is currently somewhere in that rather large "medium" range. It will probably take a LOT longer to reach "high," and then need even more time to charge all the way through the "high" range to "full."

gw-300 charging 2.png
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The various charge levels are explained in the manual that I linked in post #3. Here's the link again: http://support.casio.com/storage/en/manual/pdf/EN/009/qw2608.pdf



Yes. Your watch is currently somewhere in that rather large "medium" range. It will probably take a LOT longer to reach "high," and then need even more time to charge all the way through the "high" range to "full."

View attachment 4047050
I see now. Thanks.

I imagine that by the time I get it to Full I'll probably be bored with it by then and be ready to put it away again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
TIP: Do not try to "test" the battery by hitting the light button 50 times. It may appear to be okay after doing that, but then you may pick up the watch a few minutes later and find that it has gone back to zero.

Don't ask me how I know this. That's not important. Just giving some friendly advice.
 

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TIP: Do not try to "test" the battery by hitting the light button 50 times. It may appear to be okay after doing that, but then you may pick up the watch a few minutes later and find that it has gone back to zero.

Don't ask me how I know this. That's not important. Just giving some friendly advice.
lololol :)
 

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Back in business with a Medium level charge!

I estimate it took 3 hours of outdoor sunlight, plus around 12 hours inside near a window, partially cloudy.

Now I'm wondering how long it should take to get from medium to high. Or if I should even worry since everything works on it now.
I have a Rangeman and to get the charge level from M to H took 3 days sitting on the window sill. Note that I'm located in Malaysia where it is sunny and hot all year round.
 
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