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Hey guys. I'm new to this message board, and kinda cool to collectible watches. Someone recently gave me a Benrus series 3011 men's watch. I can't seem to find a whole lot about on the internet. I believe it to be a Swiss watch from the early 60's era, maybe 62, from the scant info I can find. There doesn't seem to be a lot of people selling them, and the demand seems to be pretty low. The few I see on ebay I have seen are in the $50-100 range. Is this watch decent? Is it worth anything? It seems to run a pretty slow, and looses about 5 minutes every hour or so when fully wound. Its 20 years older than me, so I'm sure it could use a little clean and lube. That being said, I want to learn how to clean and lube watches myself. I have a Nice Citizen Eco-Drive that needs service, as well as a Seiko Pogue 6139 I really want to take apart and clean, but I know jack squat about watch assembly currently....and I don't want to learn on those. So, I need some practice watches. I want to learn and experiment on some less valuable ones first. Is this one of those watches? Or is this something that someone might actually want for a decent price? How desirable is this watch? It looks reall nice, in great condition with original box, but it keeps time like crap, so it needs work anyways.

Here's a couple pics. Thanks.

benrus1.JPG

benrus2.JPG

in box.JPG
 

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Thanks, it actually looks nicer in person. The pics make it look a little rougher than it is. Its this watch desirable, or worth anything to anyone out there in the general populous? Or is it a good "practice watch" to attempt to service myself as a novice and not fret too much if I break it?
 

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It's also very nice to have the original box. So I agree, buy a cheap watch or movement on Ebay and practice on that.
fyi Jurgensgermany has 2 serviced gold plated Benrus. Here's one.
 

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Its this watch desirable, or worth anything to anyone out there in the general populous?
Someone will definitely buy it if you put it on eBay. Especially with the box. It's in nice condition and has an appealing vintage style. FYI, it's generally not in your interest to have it serviced if you just intend to sell it.
 

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Someone will definitely buy it if you put it on eBay. Especially with the box. It's in nice condition and has an appealing vintage style. FYI, it's generally not in your interest to have it serviced if you just intend to sell it.
What do you think its worth? I can't seem to find a lot for sale to use as a reference point....I am thinking $50-100 max?
 

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What do you think its worth? I can't seem to find a lot for sale to use as a reference point....I am thinking $50-100 max?
Yes, I agree with that general assessment. Anyone buying it will need to have it serviced, and it's not an intrinsically valuable watch given the gold-plated case and the absence of a high-end brand name. However, it's a nice wearable vintage watch, and someone is likely to appreciate the condition and the distinctive style elements (e.g. the lugs and the the font of the applied numerical dial markers).
 

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Yes, I agree with that general assessment. Anyone buying it will need to have it serviced, and it's not an intrinsically valuable watch given the gold-plated case and the absence of a high-end brand name. However, it's a nice wearable vintage watch, and someone is likely to appreciate the condition and the distinctive style elements (e.g. the lugs and the the font of the applied numerical dial markers).
That's what I figured. Personally I think its ugly as sin, and screams "old man" or "grandpa watch". I also belonged to an old man/grandpa, so maybe that's where I'm getting that from, but it looks the part to me.

If it's any help, mine cost me the equivalent of $25 back in 2014, admittedly without a box.

Regards.
What are really the major determining factors for watch value? Obviously brand/model, but what else really? I mean condition has to play a role too, but from what I can research, this is a pretty well made swiss watch. It seems like it uses quality construction, but what makes it not a major contender for collect-ability? Other old watches of different brand, but similar style construction seem to go for a lot more. Was Benrus just a cheaper brand, or what?
 

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While there are a few Benrus models that are particularly desirable, in general, Benrus was a mid-tier brand, and a watch like this is not particularly special. Plated cases are less desirable than solid gold or stainless. Larger watches are more desirable than smaller. Condition is important. Brand name is important. The use of an "in-house" movement adds value. There are many factors, but if I go on, I'm probably just going to end up oversimplifying things. If you're really interested, you can start following some eBay auctions for watches that appeal to you, and you'll gradually learn their values.

Sales offers are not allowed on this forum, but there is a separate sales forum.
 

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While there are a few Benrus models that are particularly desirable, in general, Benrus was a mid-tier brand, and a watch like this is not particularly special. Plated cases are less desirable than solid gold or stainless. Larger watches are more desirable than smaller. Condition is important. Brand name is important. The use of an "in-house" movement adds value. There are many factors, but if I go on, I'm probably just going to end up oversimplifying things. If you're really interested, you can start following some eBay auctions for watches that appeal to you, and you'll gradually learn their values.

Sales offers are not allowed on this forum, but there is a separate sales forum.
Sorry, I was not intending to break any rules. Perhaps I'll take this apart. I'm trying to learn watch repair, and I gotta start somewhere. This one falls into the narrow catagory of relatively cheap, but still probably worth servicing.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I actually have saved pretty much every watch I've ever owned....after the batteries ran out, or it broke, or whatever. My collection pretty much runs the spectrum from a $30 Timex Indi-glow, thru a $300 Citizen Eco-drive, up to a Seiko Pogue 6139 which is fairly pricey. I'm basically trying to get the Seiko serviced, and would like to learn watch repair myself. Obviously, I would like to learn on some cheaper watches first.
 

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What do you mean by an "in house" movement? I am assuming you mean one that was actually made by the brand name maker, used in a brand name watch, and not resold and used in another cheaper brand watch?
 

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Here's a $3.99 automatic Timex on Ebay. Free shipping. It only runs for a few seconds when shaken. I'd suggest something like this before you dive into a nice vintage watch.
 

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LOL, I wanted to dive right into the Seiko 6139, which is probably a $1500 watch, and all the wise watch geeks talked me out of it. I was thinking the Benrus would be a good learning candidate as its relatively inexpensive but probably still pretty complex to learn. Maybe you're right, and I should start with REALLY tiny baby steps on the Timex......lol. I was worried a crappy battery operated Timex wouldn't simulate the same level of complexity and complication that I need to learn to fix an actually decent watch though.
 

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What do you mean by an "in house" movement? I am assuming you mean one that was actually made by the brand name maker, used in a brand name watch, and not resold and used in another cheaper brand watch?
Yes, it's a factor, but I don't want to overstate the importance of it, since it's just one factor among many. But watches that use movements designed and manufactured by the same company that branded the watch are valued by some collectors, in contrast with companies that used generic movements purchased from a standard manufacturer (these are called ebauches). In the extreme case, some watch manufacturers were basically just assemblers of watches where the components were all purchased from generic suppliers.

That said, there are many examples of very desirable and collectible vintage watches that do not have in-house movements. And many ebauches are high quality movements. I think the importance of this varies quite a bit on a person-to-person basis, and I've noticed that some people seem to have pretty strong opinions about it.
 

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Yes, it's a factor, but I don't want to overstate the importance of it, since it's just one factor among many. But watches that use movements designed and manufactured by the same company that branded the watch are valued by some collectors, in contrast with companies that used generic movements purchased from a standard manufacturer (these are called ebauches). In the extreme case, some watch manufacturers were basically just assemblers of watches where the components were all purchased from generic suppliers.

That said, there are many examples of very desirable and collectible vintage watches that do not have in-house movements. And many ebauches are high quality movements. I think the importance of this varies quite a bit on a person-to-person basis, and I've noticed that some people seem to have pretty strong opinions about it.
Hmmm...that is interesting, and good to know. Thanks. I guess, to me personally, it wouldn't matter. I like to build and tinker and swap parts on other things outside the watch field. For instance classic "factory correct" cars have never appealed to me. I'd rather have a better built faster car than something that is factory original and probably worth more. I suppose, to me, the value of a watch would be based on how cool it looks, the quality of construction on the movement, and probably the value of the materials used (gold/silver, etc). An awesome looking bastard watch made out of gold with a franchised movement would be worth more in my eyes than something uglier made to a lesser quality that was all factory correct straight thru in my personal opinion. That's just me though. That may not be the reality of the watch collector market.......I have no idea.
 
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