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Three years ago a got very tired of struggling with the spring bars on my Rolex watches. On a few recommendations I took what felt like a big leap and spent $150 on the Bergeon 7825 tweezers. I was skeptical, until I tried them for the first time. Going from a normal spring bar tool to these professional tweezers was like going from hammer to a nailgun. It made bracelet swapping nearly error free.

Two and a half years later one of the tips broke off of the Bergeon. For $90 you can purchase a new set of tips. $90. So I looked around at other options and found the Horofix Spring Bar Tweezers.

At $85 Horofix Spring Bar Tweezers are cleverly priced just below the Bergeon replacements. Plus the Horofix comes with extra tips and the tool needed to replace the tips.

Ordered. Arrived. Started using. And while I'm no watchmaker and have only had them for a month, they seem comparable to the much more expensive Bergeon.

That's all. I wish I would have found a post like this three years ago. Hopefully this can be of some use to others.





 

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Thank you. Where can I get the Horofix tweezers? SepTools is out of stock and most sites only seem to have the more complicated pliers.
 

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YoureTerrific...Hellol!

Nice, timely Post, & Great Images!

I use a much ( much! ) older Swiss-made example of this Style of tweezer, and would be lost without it. Of course, $90. for a tip=silly.

For those with an adventurous spirit: these older items are available used, and tend to show-up priced about $50 USD. Take a look over at "Dave's Watch Parts". He's a Great Guy, 100% honest, and he usually has a few in stock.

Oh: there's a really nice read on hairsprings, that I have always thought highly of; "Practical Balance and Hair-spring Work", Walter J Kleinlein, 1925. As I recall, he was at Waltham's factory in Massachusetts, and pretty-much looked upon as a Final Authority (!) in such matters. I met one of his pupils, Andy Taber ( RIP ), who operated a nice shop in Bangor, Maine. Andy attended Waltham's School after he Served in the USA Army in WWll, and mentioned that Walter would 'pass' a piece of his student's work, when it was...CORRECT. PERIOD.

...and that's the way they used to do it!

Michael.
 

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I have used a pocketknife with a slightly dulled blade and works fine.

Problem with tips breaking may have to do with spring tension. Some spring bars have weak springs, but if you run into one with a strong spring. Using tweezers is going to be a little more difficult. Plus keeping those small tips centered.

DON
 

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I have used a pocketknife with a slightly dulled blade and works fine.

Problem with tips breaking may have to do with spring tension. Some spring bars have weak springs, but if you run into one with a strong spring. Using tweezers is going to be a little more difficult. Plus keeping those small tips centered.
Exactly.

I do it with a small (well sharpened) small screwdriver, or like you with a blade, without scratching anything. Those expensive tools for the straps are quite a joke...

Going from a normal spring bar tool to these professional tweezers was like going from hammer to a nailgun. It made bracelet swapping nearly error free.
Have you ever seen a watchmaker using such a tool ?
 

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Yes I have. And quite a good one.
Then you're lucky, I guess.

I've never seen such a tool on a watchmaker's bench. I do not use one as well.
Fir sure, I saw "technicians" using such a tool in swiss manufactures, where they're putting bracelets on cases the whole day.
 

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How are these holding up? I'm thinking of purchasing a set of the Horofix.

Edit: And how would these hold up against the more expensive and heavy duty looking pliers?

Thanks
 

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Would also like to hear some thoughts on the pliers vs tweezers. Not sure if I can find the Horofix here and Australian $$ in the gutter right now so those would cost around $200 shipped. Ouch!
 

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I bought the Horofix a few months back - the Ergonomic version. Works great. Much easier than other tool options on my BB58 which had a very tight bracelet end link fit.
 

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