WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys

well, now that this forum has "made" me buy all these cool, expensive watches i want to take pictures of them!...:-d

what options do i have for a macro lens for my Nikon D200?

anyone here have a D200 and shoot alot of watch pics?

thanks!

brad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
I have shot with Nikon for over 30 years and the 105mm AF-S F2.8VR is the best macro I have ever used. I used one on my D70, borrowed from a friend. I own the 60mm f2.8 AF lens, if price is an issue this lens will work well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
Yes, those are the two we are talking about. With the 105mm you will not have to get as close to the subject as with the 60mm. It will focus faster then the 60mm, and it has VR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,407 Posts
Just don't get the idea you can take pics like John Wilson no matter WHAT gear you buy!
Can't be done...o|

(Extraordinary pics John :-!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
This is with my 60mm Macro:


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
wow, great pics guys...thanks

first, this forum costs me money on watches

now it cost me money on lenses! :-d

brad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
OMG - Those photos are all fantastic. I now need to buy a quality macro lens myself.....

Rohan
Canon 400D
Breitling Super Ocean Heritage Chronograph 46
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
OMG - Those photos are all fantastic. I now need to buy a quality macro lens myself.....

Rohan
Canon 400D
Breitling Super Ocean Heritage Chronograph 46
Best I can do so far with the zoom lens I have.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I have a D200. I currently have 3 macro lenses: Tamron 90mm, Nikon 105mm VR, and Nikon 200mm.

While it's true that the Nikon 105mm VR is an awesome lens, it's also quite large and very expensive. I picked up my Tamron 90mm off ebay for about $200, and to be honest it's probably my most-used lens of the bunch. Not the best, mind you, but it's the one I'm most likely to stick in my camera bag when I think there's a chance I'll want a macro. It's light, super sharp, and more compact than the others. I highly recommend anyone interested in macro shots pick up one of these off ebay or www.keh.com, and see how much they use it before dropping big bucks on a Nikon lens.

Another very well-regarded macro with a more reasonable price tag is the Sigma 150mm HSM EX lens. But for items as large as watches, 150mm is a bit long, so a 90mm or 105mm lens is a bit preferable.

Every Nikon shooter should have the $100 Nikon 50mm f/1.8 lens (unless you get the more expensive f/1.4 version!). That lens can focus quite close, and may be adequate for watch pictures. With the addition of an extension tube, you could definitely get close enough for watch shots.

Finally, another low-cost option is the Canon 500D "Close-up lens". It's a lens adapter that screws onto the front of one of your existing lenses, and thus works fine with Nikon and all other lens brands. I have the 77mm version that attaches to my 70-200mm f/2.8 telephoto zoom, a combination that takes excellent closeup images.

-Brett
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,513 Posts
I've got the nikor 60mm but haven't gotten it dialed in yet. heres what I've gotten so far.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
With the Nikon 60mm I find manual focusing works best for me. A tripod is a must with most macro lenses. You must also use a remote or the time delay to activate the shutter, this will make the picture sharper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,513 Posts
I've been using that lens but its manual focus on the d40x and it blurs out anything that its not directly focused on. like if I point it at the center of the dial, everything else is blurred. is it the fstop setting or do I need to change to the dynamic range?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
Not an easy question to answer but I will try.

Try using a larger F stop. The greater the magnification, the shallower the depth of field. For a given magnification depth of field is linearly related to aperture - f/8 has twice the DOF of f/4, f/16 has four times the DOF of f/4 etc. You are probably shooting this close to f/2.8.

When using smaller apertures you'll find that your shutter speed will tend to drop too low, introducing camera shake and motion blur. To get around this use a high ISO and a sunny day, or a flashgun in M mode. You'll need to get the shutter speed to 1/100 second or faster to combat shake.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top