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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in the Watchmaking Forum, but thought more help would come from here.

I have a number of stainless bracelets suffering from desk diving marks and general wear. Some are a mix of polished and brushed while others are all brushed or all polished. How can I polish/rejuvenate these without just going to a jeweler? Any products? Techniques? I am not very skilled...


Thanks for your help.
 

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Cape Cod Cloth for bright shine,green scrubby for brush effect ...anything else requires skill....IMHO
 

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i have various brush pads and use the dremel stylus. if it's a bracelet with just one finish it's easy, i've found the green scotch pad doesn't quite match the original rolex finish, cape cod doesn't do the big scratches and then there's a purplish 3m pad that is a bit aggressive but some watches look better with that finish, like the seiko 007. apart from that, you'd have to buy the machine with the multiple pad and compounds and all the watch tools to take the watch apart and replicate polish and brush finishes... i'm tempted but to lazy to actually take a watch apart and do a professional looking job...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i have various brush pads and use the dremel stylus. if it's a bracelet with just one finish it's easy, i've found the green scotch pad doesn't quite match the original rolex finish, cape cod doesn't do the big scratches and then there's a purplish 3m pad that is a bit aggressive but some watches look better with that finish, like the seiko 007. apart from that, you'd have to buy the machine with the multiple pad and compounds and all the watch tools to take the watch apart and replicate polish and brush finishes... i'm tempted but to lazy to actually take a watch apart and do a professional looking job...

Would the Cape Cod after the green scotch-bright restore the Rolex shine?
 

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With polished bracelets you may be able to hide some of the marks by using a metal polish like Simichrome. Deeper scratches will require more aggressive steps. I've made them look new by using sanding sticks (check watch/jewelry suppliers like Esslinger) and buffing with rouge applied to a buffing wheel that is mounted on a Dremel tool.
 

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Of course, only use on bare metal


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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No idea why one would use a Cape Cod Cloth on a crystal.

It will not touch a sapphire because sapphire is too hard and it will make a big rouge mess that you'll have to clean up.

It won't touch a mineral or Hardlex crystal either. You'd need diamond paste and even then most can't get a satisfactory result on a mineral crystal.

As far as acrylic, I'm not sure but again, it's messy and there are perfect things link Polywatch available for acrylic crystals.

Cape Cod Cloths are only for polished surfaces. They will remove smaller and hairline scratches and if used on a brushed finish, they will remove the brushing.


Thanks. Will the Cape Cod Clothe ruin a crystal?
 

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I know you wanted to avoid a jeweler, but watch repair shops have the tools and expertise to do it right. I'd hate to screw up my own watches and gain frustration for a bad shine - that's even worse than my frustration for having scratches :) I bet a watch repair shop will not charge you much
 

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Actually the best thing to do is to not polish your bracelet. Why, you gradually wear away the metal and, you will inevitably get more scratches.
 
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