WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 174 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK guys I need some advice. I purchased a PO 2500 and just received it today (great recommendation of an AD by members here. I appreciate it).

Anyway, I take it out of the box and I discover that the bezel is slightly mis-aligned, probably by about a half click. When I rest it at the 12 o'clock position, the point of the triangle either touches the right or left side of the marker on the dial, it doesn't split it down the center.

I know this may sound nit-picky to some, but for what these cost I think it should be dead center. I have several cheapo Invictas and a Luminox that are lined up correctly.

Should I call the AD back and have him swap it out? Or, should I go to my local Omega outlet (right down the road) and have them look at it? I'd imagine they'd have to tear out the ball bearing track and re-align it/glue it back down. Then, of course, I run the risk of them screwing something ELSE up on it, just like my local auto garage.

I've read that this is somewhat common (shockingly) in these watches.

What would you do?

thanks again!

Here is the problem by the way. these two pictures show the consecutive clicks and how they align on the dial:

photo.JPG
photo.JPG

And here's my el-cheapo Invicta diver. $120 bucks and all markers are aligned perfectly. I've had 2 or three others and the same has been true. kind of irks me.:

photo.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
OK guys I need some advice. I purchased a PO 2500 and just received it today (great recommendation of an AD by members here. I appreciate it).

Anyway, I take it out of the box and I discover that the bezel is slightly mis-aligned, probably by about a half click. When I rest it at the 12 o'clock position, the point of the triangle either touches the right or left side of the marker on the dial, it doesn't split it down the center.

I know this may sound nit-picky to some, but for what these cost I think it should be dead center. I have several cheapo Invictas and a Luminox that are lined up correctly.

Should I call the AD back and have him swap it out? Or, should I go to my local Omega outlet (right down the road) and have them look at it? I'd image they have to tear out the ball bearing track and re-align it/glue it back down. Then, of course, I run the risk of them screwing something ELSE up on it, just like my local auto garage.

I've read that this is somewhat common (shockingly) in these watches.

What would you do?

thanks again!


There is no "ball bearing track." Do a detailed search of the forum. I use Google and isolate results to WUS. This has been covered many, many times before. You will find very detailed info, and all of your questions will be answered. For a perfect alignment, you'll need a new/different click spring. Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,873 Posts


There is no "ball bearing track." Do a detailed search of the forum. I use Google and isolate results to WUS. This has been covered many, many times before. You will find very detailed info, and all of your questions will be answered. For a perfect alignment, you'll need a new/different click spring. Best of luck.
What more can I say...?

cheers,
Jake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I've searched and read that it is somewhat common. But my question of whether to expect the AD to exchange it is just an opinion and probably won't appear in google results. I was just asking the board for their opinion. Either way its something mechanical that needs to be modified on the watch and i don't think i should have to do that straight out of the box.

I will look for the click spring thought. I appreciate your clues. thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,873 Posts
But my question of whether to expect the AD to exchange it is just an opinion and probably won't appear in google results... Either way its something mechanical that needs to be modified on the watch and i don't think i should have to do that straight out of the box.
If I'm honest, they probably won't do much (if anything). However, if they have their own watchmaker, it is a quick fix (2-3 minutes).
Anyway, just Google "planet ocean bezel alignment" and you'll get all the information you require.

cheers,
Jake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
I've searched and read that it is somewhat common. But my question of whether to expect the AD to exchange it is just an opinion and probably won't appear in google results. I was just asking the board for their opinion. Either way its something mechanical that needs to be modified on the watch and i don't think i should have to do that straight out of the box.

I will look for the click spring thought. I appreciate your clues. thanks.

Here's what they'll say:

1) It's within specs, and there is a bit of tolerance allowed for the final alignment of the bezel marker. As you'll find out when you read up more on the subject, the final alignment is dictated only by the height of the tabs on the click spring. It's a five or ten dollar part. It's a wear and tear item. When I got my first PO, I went to an boutique and examined a dozen or so POs. Several had a slightly off center bezel. It's not just Omega. Watches with these sort of bezels all show some degree of mis-alignment on a portion of watches.

2) They MIGHT help you out and swap out the click spring for you. If they have a watchmaker on site, it's a three minute job. It's generally up to their discretion. Just be nice, but firm, and ask that they do this for you. They did do this for me, under warranty, and while I waited. After I got a new click spring, it was perfect. I always have a spare click spring at home now, and I do mine myself.

I doubt they'll give you another watch. Never say never, though.

Do a search for more info. Best of luck....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Gotcha. Thanks I just found your post which seems to contain some good info. Tell you what though....If they tell me it's "within spec," that isn't going to fly. Like I posted originally, I have three sub-$150 divers and all of them have PERFECT bezel alignment. All markers are split down the center. There is no way that I personally find it acceptable that a mis-aligned bezel can make it through quality control on a $3 to $4 thousand dollar watch. I'll see what they will do for me tomorrow and I'll report back.

Thanks once again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,754 Posts
That would irk me to no end. I had two POs and both had dead on bezel alignment.

I don't see the harm in calling the place you bought it from and/or making a trip to the Omega boutique. Good luck and hope you get it resolved!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
My 2531 had the same problem. The bezel was misaligned as bad as one could possibly be. I walked it into Swatch Group Service Center West Los Angeles and they corrected the problem for free in 5 minutes, no charge. And it wasn't even under warranty.

I believe (Omega) they take off the bezel with a special wrench that will not scratch. Mark the correct spot on the metal bezel where the alignment should be. Pop the bezel insert out (the whole round thing with the numbers), then carefully match up the bezel insert with the reference mark they made on the metal bezel and pop the insert back in the bezel. Then they put the bezel back on the watch with their hand or using a bezel press if it is difficult. It sounds easy but you really need the correct tools to do it without damaging anything.

I hope everything works out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
My 2531 had the same problem. The bezel was misaligned as bad as one could possibly be. I walked it into Swatch Group Service Center West Los Angeles and they corrected the problem for free in 5 minutes, no charge. And it wasn't even under warranty.

I believe (Omega) they take off the bezel with a special wrench that will not scratch. Mark the correct spot on the metal bezel where the alignment should be. Pop the bezel insert out (the whole round thing with the numbers), then carefully match up the bezel insert with the reference mark they made on the metal bezel and pop the insert back in the bezel. Then they put the bezel back on the watch with their hand or using a bezel press if it is difficult. It sounds easy but you really need the correct tools to do it without damaging anything.

I hope everything works out.

I find it very strange that they even attempted to "fix" it that way, for two reasons. First, I believe the insert is spot welded to the bezel itself. Why they would break that connection is beyond me. Makes no sense. Also, especially with the SMPs, rotating the bezel insert independently from the bezel itself will result in perhaps a more accurately aligned triangle marker at twelve o'clock, but it will also throw off the alignment that marker has with the "scallops" of the bezel itself. Again, makes no sense. The bezel assembly is one solid, constant piece. Adjusting the one adjustable component underneath is the only proper way to resolve this issue.

The only reason I know a decent amount about the subject is because I've actually worked together with my friends at Omega, on more than one occasion, to fix this issue on a few watches of mine. At first, on the first PO of mine that we worked on, the techs tried to adjust all three tabs on the click spring. This was ultimately a futile exercise, as the spring is not really a sturdy enough piece to be manipulated and reshaped, and it was nearly impossible to get all three tabs to be exactly the same height (with each other) again.

We found it was far simpler to take out a new spring and pop it right in. Most of the replacement click springs have the tabs set at the proper height, right out of the packaging. We did come across one or two click springs, in the course of working on three or four watches, that also resulted in a less than perfect fit, but on the whole, most new ones seem to be spot on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Replies like "do a search", "buy a new click spring", "remove the bezel and fix it" are so ridiculous.
The guy bought a NEW expensive "high end" watch and he DEMANDS the bezel to be aligned correctly.
Unfortunately half of the Omegas I have seen have the same problem which is absolutely not acceptable at that price range for me.
My reply is:
RETURN IT AND ASK FOR A NEW WATCH NOW
And my advice is:
Never buy watches without seeing them in person before
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,556 Posts
Paracord, welcome and let me say that that would also irk me no end. From experience, (not Omega related) every time I looked at my watch, which is often, that would be the first thing I saw, before noticing the time. I feel for you. Try your hardest with approaching your AD and every Omega Service centre possible for a quick and free fix for that in my eye, is definitely not within spec. Take your Invicta along also. All else fails, hit the email button to the customer service rep for your area/state. Best of luck mate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,860 Posts
When you pay the asking price for a PO, you don't expect a date with a hot Supermodel. You don't expect a 5 year guarantee of constant bliss and happiness . . . But you definitely expect the bezel to line up with the markers on the dial!

I love the PO. It's my favorite Omega model. An Invicta should not even remotely come close to being better in any way, shape, or form than a PO. (With the obvious exception of price though.) If my PO looked like that, I'd be POed.

(If the problem can't be fixed quickly and easily, either demand a new one or get your money back.)


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
To those who consider this a huge deal, I say study the mechanisms underneath and perhaps you will see that this is, in reality, not a very big deal. It's not like the case or bezel assembly is bad here. Yes, in an ideal world, all the bezels on all the POs and SMPs and IWC AT 2000s and all the Breitlings and every other modern diver's watch that uses this same mechanical setup would be aligned with laser perfect precision. The reality is much different. SOME watches will come with a slightly mis-aligned bezel. ALL companies that make diver's watches with rotating bezels will encounter this issue. Most, if not all, have a "range of alignment" that they feel are within tolerances.

Yes, one should feel entitled to a perfectly aligned bezel. But in reality, there's a chance you may get a watch that is slightly off of perfect. Believe me, the reason I have experience with these bezels is because I am an absolute neurotic about this issue.

My advice is to be pragmatic when addressing the issue. If the watch has been worn, they will likely not exchange it for another. The case and bezel assembly of the watch will still be perfect. If you really want the issue resolved, and they decide NOT to give you a new watch, then the next best thing to do would be to work WITH them. Have them swap in a new click spring and you are set. It's really nothing to get too worked up over. There are solutions. Yes, try and get another watch. If that fails, as, unfortunately, it likely will, then demand they swap out the click spring and be done with it. There's no need to get too upset about it, is my point.

Lastly, to those who lambast the design of this mechanical setup, think about it... Would you rather have it this way, where the watch case and bezel assembly are milled-from-solid pieces that will last an eternity, but are held together with an inexpensive and easily replaced, essentially disposable, part, or would you rather the case and bezel actually interface with each other and eventually wear out themselves? This is the better, more maintainable design, for sure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,465 Posts
A simple easy fix for any watchmaker, ive even re-aligned a bezel on one of my other watches, although this Omega Diver watch hits the markers all the time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,860 Posts
Lastly, to those who lambast the design of this mechanical setup, think about it... Would you rather have it this way, where the watch case and bezel assembly are milled-from-solid pieces that will last an eternity, but are held together with an inexpensive and easily replaced, essentially disposable, part, or would you rather the case and bezel actually interface with each other and eventually wear out themselves? This is the better, more maintainable design, for sure.
I'd want a quality, Swiss-made, divers watch that both is and looks the part. That one doesn't. Omega and other luxury brands may have "tolerances" for bezel misalignment. Their customers do as well. At that price point, customers tolerate nothing short of perfection when it comes to the bezel lining up properly. The bezel on my Christopher Ward C60 diver's model lines up perfectly. The bezel on the OP's Invicta lines up perfectly. If Invicta can get it right, the watch-makers working at Omega should be able to do it perfectly while blind-folded, sleep-deprived, and inebriated.

Honestly, there are pics of some excellent-looking fake PO models floating around on WUS. Those disgusting individuals go to the trouble of making their fakes with perfectly aligned bezels. And Omega can't do the same on the real thing??

Is this going to be one of the new ways we can tell a real PO from a fake? Someone posts a pic that they think proves their new PO is a fake because the bezel is misaligned. It's going to be an odd mix of happiness and confusion when someone tells him, "Oh don't worry. That indicates that your PO is real."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
All this would make more sense if it was a fixed part of the watch. However, it's a tool which is made to measure elapsed time from wherever the minute is when you start measuring, and is not meant to sit pointing at the top of the 12 marker all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
I'd want a quality, Swiss-made, divers watch that both is and looks the part. That one doesn't. Omega and other luxury brands may have "tolerances" for bezel misalignment. Their customers do as well. At that price point, customers tolerate nothing short of perfection when it comes to the bezel lining up properly. The bezel on my Christopher Ward C60 diver's model lines up perfectly. The bezel on the OP's Invicta lines up perfectly. If Invicta can get it right, the watch-makers working at Omega should be able to do it perfectly while blind-folded, sleep-deprived, and inebriated.

Honestly, there are pics of some excellent-looking fake PO models floating around on WUS. Those disgusting individuals go to the trouble of making their fakes with perfectly aligned bezels. And Omega can't do the same on the real thing??

Is this going to be one of the new ways we can tell a real PO from a fake? Someone posts a pic that they think proves their new PO is a fake because the bezel is misaligned. It's going to be an odd mix of happiness and confusion when someone tells him, "Oh don't worry. That indicates that your PO is real."
Well, truly discerning (read: educated) buyers may have more sympathy for a well designed mechanical interface, which this setup certainly is. Besides, it is possible to achieve a perfect lineup with this setup, as mentioned above.

In twenty five years, a PO might be on its fifth, sixth or seventh bezel spring and click spring, but its case and bezel assembly will still be in great shape, mechanically/functionally speaking. When that seventh set of springs gets installed, the bezel assembly will once again work exactly like new.

These cheaper watches likely use an inferior setup, one where the pieces have a more direct interface — meaning the case itself likely has tabs or protrusions or other type of anchoring point(s) for the bezel assembly to attach to. Sure, a more direct, two piece mechanical setup might offer a better bezel alignment than one that relies on separate springs to hold the two main components together, but I know which type of setup I would prefer.

Again, I don't see how anyone who has taken apart and studied one of these watches' mechanical setups can still feel this is an issue worth getting too upset about. Before it was explained to me in detail how they worked, sure, I felt anxious about my bezel not being perfectly aligned. But that's because, since I had no knowledge of what was actually going on underneath that bezel assembly, I figured my watch case or the bezel assembly itself was defective. Of course that would make anyone upset. Once I understood that it was just a thin little disposable metal gasket, essentially, and a wire spring, that held it all together and was responsible for the bezel's alignment, I could see it really was not a big deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
By the way, have you ever noticed how many companies' chronograph's seconds recorder hands are off of center, even in their catalogs? Take a look at Zenith's website. Many of their El Primeros' hands are off center. When you think about it, a bezel assembly being slightly off center should be a much smaller deal than a chrono seconds hand being mis-aligned. At least the bezel assembly is an essentially superficial part, and not directly connected to the movement!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
I had the same problem with my seamaster.I took it into the boutique in Sydney and it was altered no problem.It actually came back from a service misaligned which i thought was a bit ironic,but there you are,they fixed it up no fuss.
 
1 - 20 of 174 Posts
Top