WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

141 - 160 of 174 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
I just thought of something. While everything I just wrote about there being no actual precise "proper" location for the hole holds true, there is one circumstance that I did not touch upon where the hole might come into play, in terms of bezel alignment. A BADLY drilled hole, as in a misshapen hole, could allow the click spring just enough room so that the anchoring tab moves around enough within that irregular hole to allow for a misalignment.

I concede that this could happen — on one in maybe ten thousand watches. But a well drilled, regular hole for the anchoring tab could be placed anywhere along the perimeter, and its location wouldn't matter. The chances of all these Omegas with slightly misaligned bezel assemblies all having deformed or badly drilled holes in their cases is minuscule to non-existent.

I don't see why you guys can't just admit that it's the click spring that is responsible for final bezel assembly alignment. I'll say it one final time: When you bring in your slightly misaligned PO or SMP to Omega, the first thing they do is to try and adjust the click spring tabs. If that becomes difficult, which it most definitely will, then they will just swap out the click spring for a new one, and most of the time, the problem is then solved.

The click springs are rather delicate. You can easily damage or alter the click spring tab heights by pushing the bezel in the reverse direction. The only things keeping the bezel from rotating backwards are the three little metal tabs that stick up from the click spring. Ask any Omega tech and I'm sure they'll tell you they see damaged, badly worn, and badly adjusted click springs every single day. It's a common issue because that part is meant to be a wear and tear item. Of course, some of these also come from the factory slightly too high, or slightly too low. These little deviations from "perfect" translate to a misaligned bezel assembly.

Like I wrote a while back, when I went to examine all the POs and SMPs some of my local ADs and boutiques had, I think it was like two or three put of every ten had some degree of misalignment. I guarantee you those watches did not have bezel insert alignment problems, and they did not have badly drilled, oblong holes for their click spring anchoring tabs to slot into. Seriously, it's not rocket science, guys....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
Wrong. The resting position of the click ring tabs which stop the bezel when trying to rotate it clockwise are in DIRECT relation to this hole and the pin that sits in it. Would you like me to draw you a diagram so you can clearer understand, Dixan?

If the hole is off, the click ring is off, and the pre-assembled bezel sits off...Full stop.

How many times are you gonna "bow out" of this thread anyways?
Please stop posting bad info on this forum. Seriously. The first sentence of this post, and indeed this whole entire theory of yours is ridiculous. Please stop.

If you see my post immediately following the one you just replied to, I do agree that a MISSHAPEN hole could affect alignment. But these, at least with Omegas, must be extremely rare, as those holes are a part of the actual watch case. The HOLE PLACEMENT, in terms of where a (well drilled, perfectly shaped) hole is located on the perimeter of the click spring groove is totally, completely, utterly irrelevant.

And believe me, I'd love to stop coming back to this, but you keep throwing out ridiculous misinformation, so I have to keep coming back to correct you. Please, please stop. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
I just thought of something. While everything I just wrote about there being no actual precise "proper" location for the hole holds true, there is one circumstance that I did not touch upon where the hole might come into play, in terms of bezel alignment. A BADLY drilled hole, as in a misshapen hole, could allow the click spring just enough room so that the anchoring tab moves around enough within that irregular hole to allow for a misalignment.

I concede that this could happen — on one in maybe ten thousand watches. But a well drilled, regular hole for the anchoring tab could be placed anywhere along the perimeter, and its location wouldn't matter. The chances of all these Omegas with slightly misaligned bezel assemblies all having deformed or badly drilled holes in their cases is minuscule to non-existent.

I don't see why you guys can't just admit that It's the click springs that are responsible for final bezel assembly alignment. I'll say it one final time: When you bring in your slightly misaligned PO or SMP to Omega, the first thing they do is to try and adjust the click spring tabs. If that becomes difficult, which it most definitely will, then they will just swap out the click spring for a new one, and most of the time, the problem is then solved.

The click springs are rather delicate. You can easily damage or alter the click spring tab heights by pushing the bezel in the reverse direction. The only things keeping the bezel from rotating backwards are the three little metal tabs that stick up from the click spring. Some of these also come from the factory slightly too high, or slightly too low. These little deviances from "perfect" translate to a misaligned bezel assembly.

Seriously, it's not rocket science, guys....
Wrong again. You seem to have a very poor understanding of a very simple mechanical concept, and I'm not sure why you continue to re-itterate that I'm the one who's not understanding. The click spring is anchored in the case by a pin, which means that the permanent location of the click spring tabs is dermined by where this pin is anchored.

As you can see in my diagram (again), we have one correctly drilled hole. We make all of our bezel/insert assemblies to match with this hole and the click spring that rests inside of it, permanently anchored. When we install these assemblies, they will sit correctly, with the triangle directly above 12.




Now, if we install the same assembly on case two which has a hole that is drilled off to the right by a fraction of a mm, the click spring tabs who's permanent position has been determined by this mis-drilled hole, will rest off to the right by a fraction of a mm.

Therefore, since the tabs are responsible for stopping the bezel, making it uni-directional, are now resting off to the right by a fraction of a mm, and we install our pre-assembled bezel/insert assembly which has been made to line up with the correct case (pic#1), the 12 oclock triangle will sit off to the right by that same fraction of a mm.

I'll add
a question as well, the statement:

I concede that this could happen — on one in maybe ten thousand watches
This wouldn't be a case of opinion being presented as fact, would it? I'm wondering how much hands on experience you have with watch parts manufacturing to be able to even estimate a figure like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
Wrong again. You seem to have a very poor understanding of a very simple mechanical concept, and I'm not sure why you continue to re-itterate that I'm the one who's not understanding. The click spring is anchored in the case by a pin, which means that the permanent location of the click spring tabs is dermined by where this pin is anchored.


It doesn't matter where the click spring tabs are located on the perimeter of the click spring!!! The click spring is ROUND. The click spring tabs' relationship to the slots on the underside of the bezel assembly is what is important, and that relationship remains constant, no matter where the three little click spring tabs are located!!!


:This wouldn't be a case of opinion being presented as fact, would it? I'm wondering how much hands on experience you have with watch parts manufacturing to be able to even estimate a figure like that.
/SIZE]


Not in the slightest. See, I like being as precise as possible with my writing. Adding the word "maybe," as I did above, means I was not suggesting that my broad estimation was an exact figure. I used a large figure to make the point that misshapen holes on watch cases are likely very rare, and certainly not two or three in ten, which is about how many misaligned bezels I saw the last time I carefully looked, as mentioned already above.

Perhaps in your business, dealing with far less expensive (and therefore less carefully made) watch cases, you might run into these misshapen holes more often. You'd know better about that than I. But I highly, highly doubt Omega uses suppliers who produce watch cases with many misshapen holes. I maintain that one in ten thousand, while being a totally rough estimate, may not be too far off the mark. If anything, it's likely less than that.


Peace out, brother. I am well and done. I think we've both done a thorough job of putting out our respective theories. You can continue to believe whatever you want....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
z
It doesn't matter where the click spring tabs are located on the perimeter of the click spring!!! The click spring is ROUND. The click spring tabs' relationship to the slots on the underside of the bezel assembly is what is important, and that relationship remains constant, no matter where the three little click spring tabs are located!!!

Peace out, brother. I am well and done. I think we've both done a thorough job of putting out our respective theories. You can continue to believe whatever you want....
Yes, the spring is round. Very good! I'm glad that you understand that...and it has tabs on that very round spring that stop the bezel from rotating. If you move the tab over by mis-drilling the hole in the case in which the anchoring pin sits (which determines the permanent position of ring and it's tabs) 0.02mm closer to the 12 o'clock of the case, then it will stop the bezel from rotating 0.02mm past the 12 o'clock. That is exactly why my above stated fact (not theory) holds true. I'm sharing this info, by the way, because I've seen it several times, including with the case that I just took pictures of for this thread. To tell me that the position of that hole does not affect the resting position of the bezel is ludicrous. If you don't understand, then that's fine, and I invite you to move on as you've so very falsely promised on a few occasions over the course of this thread. However, please do not claim that the info is bad, because you'll only be proven wrong.

The sharing of the above pictures was meant to show an explanation of one of the reasons why a bezel may be misaligned, and it does exactly that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
you might run into these misshapen holes more often.
You have misunderstood the picture. The hole is not "misshapen" It had begun to be drilled in the correct spot, just a dimple and not enough for a pin to enter. Something caused either the machine or the case to "jump" while being drilled is my best guess, and the hole ended up being drilled a little bit to the right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Lol. I wasn't going to reply to this thread again, but after seeing this post, I felt compelled to do so. The location of the single hole for the downward facing tab that anchors the click spring into the click spring groove, at least on Omega watches, has ZERO BEARING on alignment issues. How are you even coming to this conclusion??? You could locate that hole anywhere on the perimeter and it would make NO DIFFERENCE to the alignment of the bezel. Think about it. The thing ROTATES. There is no real "up" or "down," or any other "proper" location for the little click spring anchoring tab.

...

Dixan, I wasn't going to comment on something where I have no hands on experience, other than using the final assembly in the manner the end user is supposed to.

I dont understand your statement above.

The way I see it is as follows:



To produce clicks you need some way to prevent the click spring rotating freely. Otherwise there will be no clicks.

The clicks are determined by the tabs on the click spring and the notches under the bezel.

The click positions are supposed to be on specific locations around the periphery of the dial which is held in the case.

So obviously the position of the tabs in relation to the case are important. Otherwise the click stops will be at any arbitrary location.

To produce the click stops at specific locations around the dial you need to retain the tabs at specific locations in relation to the case.

I can clearly see the need to have that hole in a very precise location.

How can the position of the hole be not important?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
Very well explained, ddatta. That is exactly how it works, and you understand perfectly.

Move the hole by 0.02mm, and you move the resting position of the bezel by 0.02mm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
Dixan, I wasn't going to comment on something where I have no hands on experience, other than using the final assembly in the manner the end user is supposed to.

I dont understand your statement above.

The way I see it is as follows:


To produce clicks you need some way to prevent the click spring rotating freely. Otherwise there will be no clicks. Yes. Exactly. In fact, you can attach the bezel assembly to the watch with no click spring whatsoever; you would just end up with a free spinning bezel assembly. It's the click spring that gives it the "clicks," and also the final alignment.

The clicks are determined by the tabs on the click spring and the notches under the bezel. Yes. Absolutely.

The click positions are supposed to be on specific locations around the periphery of the dial which is held in the case. Yes. There are three little "click tabs" that stick up and engage with the 120 slots underneath. (IWC uses four for the AT 2000.) As long as these three tabs are equidistant from one another, meaning each is somewhere on the periphery, but one third of the way around the spring, the bezel assembly can "rest" comfortably and comes into contact with the tabs in a nicely balanced way. It makes NO difference If the first one is at, say, 2 o'clock, 3 o'clock, or 5 o'clock. As long as they are spaced out correctly.

Jake insists that where these three tabs are, and the exact distance they are from the downward facing anchoring tab actually aligns the bezel assembly. This is false. It's how high or low these three little tabs stick up that determines the final bit of bezel assembly alignment.


So obviously the position of the tabs in relation to the case are important. Otherwise the click stops will be at any arbitrary location. Yes. As explained above, and as I've written from the very beginning, and many times in the past in other threads, as long as they are spaced out evenly, each tab could be a bit more clockwise or counterclockwise in location, and it wouldn't make any difference. As long as they're evenly spaced out, you're good.

To produce the click stops at specific locations around the dial you need to retain the tabs at specific locations in relation to the case. No, you don't. It's a rotating piece. The clicks are created, with an Omega bezel, at three points around the bezel. Again, those tabs could be a little higher or lower along the periphery, as long as they are equidistant from each other. Of course, Omega had a standardized location for these, but they could have located them in slightly different spots, and it wouldn't have mattered, in terms of bezel alignment.

What I mean is, of course Omega has long decided on a spot for each of the tabs. But the exact location of the tabs has no bearing, whatsoever, on the bezel's final alignment. How could they?


I can clearly see the need to have that hole in a very precise location. The hole is located at 12 o'clock, likely because that makes sense. But you could drill that hole at three o'clock, or six o'clock, or ten o'clock. Why would the location of that hole matter? It cannot, in any way, affect the bezel's alignment. As long as the three tabs are spaced out accordingly, it doesn't matter where they, or the hole, are located on the periphery. It's only the relationship between the three tabs that's important, in terms of bezel alignment.

How can the position of the hole be not important? See above. Thanks!

ddatta, my replies are in bold above. Thanks.

EDIT:

ddatta: Look at this click spring. See how the three tabs are evenly spaced out? That's what is important. They could have been located a little more to the "left" or a little more to the "right." As long as they are evenly spaced out, you get a nice even bezel movement, and nice even clicks. Where they are located, precisely, along the periphery of that spring makes no difference to the the final bezel assembly alignment.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
...


1) The click positions are supposed to be on specific locations around the periphery of the dial which is held in the case. Yes. There are three little "click tabs" that stick up and engage with the 120 slots underneath. (IWC uses four for the AT 2000.) As long as these three tabs are equidistant from one another, meaning each is somewhere on the periphery, but one third of the way around the spring, the bezel assembly can "rest" comfortably and comes into contact with the tabs in a nicely balanced way. It makes NO difference If the first one is at, say, 2 o'clock, 3 o'clock, or five o'clock. As long as they are spaced put correctly. Jake insists that where these three tabs are, and the exact distance they are from the downward facing anchoring tab actually aligns the bezel assembly. This is false. It's how high or low these three little tabs stick up that determines the final bit of bezel assembly alignment.


2) So obviously the position of the tabs in relation to the case are important. Otherwise the click stops will be at any arbitrary location. Yes. As explained above, and as I've written from the very beginning, and many times in the past in other threads, as long as they are spaced out evenly, each tab could be an hour or so clockwise or counterclockwise in location, and it wouldn't make any difference. As long as they're evenly spaced out, you're good.

3) To produce the click stops at specific locations around the dial you need to retain the tabs at specific locations in relation to the case. No, you don't. It's a rotating piece. The clicks are created, with an Omega bezel, at three points around the bezel. Again, those tabs could be a little higher or lower along the periphery, as long as they are equidistant from each other. Of course, Omega had a standardized location for these, but they could have located them in slightly different spots, and it wouldn't have mattered, in terms of bezel alignment.

I mean is, of course Omega has long decided on a spot for each of the tabs. But the tabs have no being, whatsoever, on the bezel alignment. How could they?




4) I can clearly see the need to have that hole in a very precise location. The hole is located at 12 o'clock, likely because that makes sense. But you could drill that hole a three o'clock, or six o'clock, or ten o'clock. Why would the location of that hole matter? It cannot, in any way, affect the bezel's alignment. As long as the three tabs are spaced out accordingly, it doesn't matter where they, or the hole, are located on the periphery. It's only the relationship between the three tabs that's important, in terms of bezel alignment.

How can the position of the hole be not important? See above. Thanks!

I have removed the two points with which you agree outright.

It is some of the remaining that I still am not clear about. I have numbered them, something I should have done earlier.

Point 1. Do you agree that the click positions are required to be at specific locations around the dial? How many tabs and where they are is not the point at this stage. All I am saying is that the click stops need to be at specific locations. What Jake is saying is also not relevant to my question.

Point 2. (above)

Point 3. Do you mean that the click ring is a rotating piece?

Point 4. At the design stage it doesn't matter where they choose to locate the hole. At this stage it is indeed immaterial. But having decided the location and finalised the location of the related components (tabs), is it then not important that the hole always be in the same location? Can it be at any arbitrary location after this stage?

Please help me understand this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
ddatta, my replies are in bold above. Thanks.

EDIT:

ddatta: Look at this click spring. See how the three tabs are evenly spaced out? That's what is important. The could have been located a little more to the "left" or a little more to the "right." As long as they are evenly spaced out, you get a nice even bezel movement, and nice even clicks. Whey they are located, precisely, along the periphery of that spring males no difference to the the final bezel assembly.


Your picture illustrates EXACTLY why if the hole were mis-drilled to the right by a fraction of a mm, the bezel assembly would be crooked. Thank you for helping to show my point. Yes, the tabs are evenly spaced out. What you fail to see is that everything except for the dial is directly related. If any one part is off, including the case and it's little hole, then they all are.

This little drawing here illustrates perfectly.



For the sake of simplicity, in the drawing, the downward tab inside the hole, the hole itself (anchor pin and hole), and the tab that stops the bezel are located both at 12 oclock. Now, so that you can see their direct relationship to one another. Imagine moving that hole over by 0.02mm. What would happen, Dixan? Yes, the whole thing would move over by 0.02mm, thus stopping the bezel 0.02mm off the 12 o'clock mark on the dial.

To answer ddatta's question, the click ring is definitely not a rotating piece. It is fixed into the case by an anchoring pin that fits into a hole. The tabs are precisely spaced to stop the bezel at the proper "clicks" in relation to the dial.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
ddatta,

Here's one more piece of info that may help to better explain how these bezels work. Let's say you take your bezel assembly off to clean it and to swap put the bezel and click springs. I do this whenever the springs are a few years old.

When most people who have never worked with these bezel assemblies before go to re-install the bezel assembly, they think you have to be very careful and line up the 12 o'clock triangle marker, and then gently push down so that it lines up perfectly.

This is actually NOT how it's done. It actually doesn't matter where the 12 o'clock triangle is pointing. As long as the bezel spring is adjusted and seated properly (for tightness; it determines how tightly the bezel assembly fits to the case, and how hard it is to turn), and the click spring is sitting nice and flat in its groove, with its downward facing anchoring tab securely in its hole, you just place the bezel assembly on and press straight down.

You see, the actual bezel assembly alignment (as long as the bezel insert and the bezel body are in sync/aligned), is determined only by the click spring's tab heights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,873 Posts
But that didn't answer my questions.
Not to be rude, chaps, but however interesting this thread is, it's just going to go round in circles soon..

cheers,
Jake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
I have removed the two points with which you agree outright.

It is some of the remaining that I still am not clear about. I have numbered them, something I should have done earlier.

Point 1. Do you agree that the click positions are required to be at specific locations around the dial? How many tabs and where they are is not the point at this stage. All I am saying is that the click stops need to be at specific locations. What Jake is saying is also not relevant to my question.

Point 2. (above)

Point 3. Do you mean that the click ring is a rotating piece?

Point 4. At the design stage it doesn't matter where they choose to locate the hole. At this stage it is indeed immaterial. But having decided the location and finalised the location of the related components (tabs), is it then not important that the hole always be in the same location? Can it be at any arbitrary location after this stage?

Please help me understand this.

Sorry, ddatta, I was writing that last post, which was not meant as a direct reply to your post quoted here, but as an addendum to what I was discussing, while you were posting your, uh... post. ;-)


Okay. In regard to:

Point 1.: Where the three click tabs are exactly, doesn't matter. Since all of Omegas click springs have the three tabs in the current set, chosen locations, then that's where they are. But again, they easily could have chosen to place them another five minutes down the dial, or five minutes back. The click stops/click tabs do not have to be anywhere specific. It's not like, "There must be a click tab at twelve o'clock exactly!" or anything like that. As long as they're equally spaced out from one another.

As a total aside, IWC's AT 2000 uses four click tabs. I've often wondered to myself is that fourth tab offers any more stability, in terms of final bezel alignment, or bezel "springiness," etc. When you think about it, it's not impossible that their click spring adds another 33% more of the above. I don't know.... :think:

Point 3.: The click spring is most definitely not a rotating piece. Our esteemed member John_in_SC, however, has modded his bezel action before by clipping off the small downward facing anchoring tab, to create a bi-directional bezel, which he prefers. Again, this does not in any way, affect the bezel assembly's final alignment. (Actually, come to think of it, this point should say a lot, and dispel much of what Jake is theorizing about alignment being related to the 12 o'clock anchoring tab.) John's is not a "true" bi-directional action, though, as it just spins freely in the "other" direction because it's dragging the click spring backwards as it goes.

Point 4.: I agree. I'm sure they chose the twelve o'clock position because it's..., well, the conventional place to locate it, isn't it? Let's say Omega went crazy and decided to build a run of ten thousand with the hole at 12 o'clock, and then ten thousand with the hole at 3, and then 6, and 9. If the three tabs are still at their current locations — if indeed they just used the same exact click springs, but poked the anchoring tabs into the respective holes at the new locations, why would that, in any way whatsoever, affect the bezel assemblies' alignments?

And this is where that last post I made might come in handy, in terms of further explaining how the bezel assembly is attached to the case and aligned, by the two springs:

ddatta,

Here's one more piece of info that may help to better explain how these bezels work. Let's say you take your bezel assembly off to clean it and to swap put the bezel and click springs. I do this whenever the springs are a few years old.

When most people who have never worked with these bezel assemblies before go to re-install the bezel assembly, they think you have to be very careful and line up the 12 o'clock triangle marker, and then gently push down so that it lines up perfectly.

This is actually NOT how it's done. It actually doesn't matter where the 12 o'clock triangle is pointing. As long as the bezel spring is adjusted and seated properly (for tightness; it determines how tightly the bezel assembly fits to the case, and how hard it is to turn), and the click spring is sitting nice and flat in its groove, with its downward facing anchoring tab securely in its hole, you just place the bezel assembly on and press straight down.

You see, the actual bezel assembly alignment (as long as the bezel insert and the bezel body are in sync/aligned), is determined only by the click spring's tab heights.
Hope this helps! It's such a simple mechanism. I respect its simplicity and elegance, even if it's not the absolute perfect solution. :-!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
...

Point 3.: The click spring is most definitely not a rotating piece. Our esteemed member John_in_SC, however, has modded his bezel action before by clipping off the small downward facing anchoring tab, to create a bi-directional bezel, which he prefers. Again, this does not in any way, affect the bezel assembly's final alignment. (Actually, come to think of it, this point should say a lot, and dispel much of what Jake is theorizing about alignment being related to the 12 o'clock anchoring tab.) John's is not a "true" bi-directional action, though, as it just spins freely in the "other" direction because it's dragging the click spring backwards as it goes.

...

Hope this helps! It's such a simple mechanism. I respect its simplicity and elegance, even if it's not the absolute perfect solution. :-!

Ok... so I imagined also, otherwise it wouldnt make any sense having a retaining tab.

In that case I must go back to what you stated earlier in response to my question:

3) To produce the click stops at specific locations around the dial you need to retain the tabs at specific locations in relation to the case. No, you don't. It's a rotating piece. The clicks are created, with an Omega bezel, at three points around the bezel. Again, those tabs could be a little higher or lower along the periphery, as long as they are equidistant from each other. Of course, Omega had a standardized location for these, but they could have located them in slightly different spots, and it wouldn't have mattered, in terms of bezel alignment.
So it is true that to produce clicks at specific locations around the dial you need to retain the tabs at specific locations in relation to the case. I am not talking about the design stage. I am referring to how it must be after the design has been finalised. The tabs will need to be retained at specific, predefined locations and not allowed to move arbitrarily. Right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,684 Posts
Ok... so I imagined also, otherwise it wouldnt make any sense having a retaining tab.

In that case I must go back to what you stated earlier in response to my question:


So it is true that to produce clicks at specific locations around the dial you need to retain the tabs at specific locations in relation to the case. I am not talking about the design stage. I am referring to how it must be after the design has been finalised. The tabs will need to be retained at specific, predefined locations and not allowed to move arbitrarily. Right?
ddatta, sorry for the confusion. What I meant by "It's a rotating piece," was that the bezel assembly itself rotates, obviously, and that there is no one "most important" location along the click spring/bezel assembly's travel, as Jake would have you believe. That the hole is at 12 o'clock really means nothing.

Well, yeah, I guess it's important for the tabs to be always at the decided upon locations, but mainly for production reasons, really. I mean, they're not going to make three different click springs, with three different locations for the tabs. They are where they are now. Their current, decided-by-Omega locations still mean nothing, in terms of having any influence on bezel assembly alignment.

As long as the bezel insert is sitting nice and "square" with the bezel body, and the resulting bezel assembly (insert + body) is one "good to go" piece, then the only thing that will affect final bezel assembly alignment is the click spring tab heights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,418 Posts
ddatta, sorry for the confusion. What I meant by "It's a rotating piece," was that the bezel assembly itself rotates, obviously, and that there is no one "most important" location along the click spring/bezel assembly's travel, as Jake would have you believe. That the hole is at 12 o'clock really means nothing.

Well, yeah, I guess it's important for the tabs to be always at the decided upon locations, but mainly for production reasons, really. I mean, they're not going to make three different click springs, with three different locations for the tabs. They are where they are now. Their current, decided-by-Omega locations still mean nothing, in terms of having any influence on bezel assembly alignment.

As long as the bezel insert is sitting nice and "square" with the bezel body, and the resulting bezel assembly (insert + body) is one "good to go" piece, then the only thing that will affect final bezel assembly alignment is the click spring tab heights.
Holy geez...Talk about going in circles. How about a response to the drawing I provided you along with the question attached? Pretend the drawing is placed at 8 o'clock instead of 12...as you said, it doesn't matter. It's not about where the hole is positioned around the case/dial at the time of design, it's whether it's drilled correctly in relation to the rest of the parts at production. If the case is mis-drilled (as in the example I showed you) by a fraction of an mm, and not by an entire "click", the the bezel sits crooked. That's all I'm saying. It is one of many possible causes of bezel mis-alignment. I'm not sure why you seem so insistent that this is not the case. I assure you it is. There is nothing to "dispell". It is fact.

Late at night here...G'night.
 
141 - 160 of 174 Posts
Top