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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious how many actually buy from Ebay? If you win the watch you are looking for do you take it to AD right away to make sure it's not a fake? Currently bidding on a vintage lecoultre before jaegar was put on there and it looks to be in decent condition considering the age. If I do win, the auction ends on Saturday, I'm hoping my watch guy can verify it's a real lecoultre, and give me a rough estimate as to what it would cost to service it, if it's serviceable. It's a tank style watch, and since I love tank styles it would be a great addition to my collection.
 

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I buy from eBay all the time. If seller was selling fakes, ebay would close the account (unless it was advertised as a replica). I've never bought a watch more than $1000 there though. For the affordables that I buy I usually just check the seller ratings. Then when the watch comes, I check the watch. If I think it is perfect quality and I can see an ETA movement from the caseback, it is good. I don't buy vintage watches though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, and the bid is only at a buck. Guy wants 8 for shipping, so a lecoultre for 9 bucks, plus maybe 1-200 or more for service, and a potential for it to be worth a lot more, if I win it for as low as it's at and can get it serviced for cheap I think I am making a great deal. However since it is a square face watch and I love them, I would probably keep it. Not like I need money at all, and besides I can own a lecoultre for a fraction of the cost so it's a win for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A lot could happen. Maybe you stumble along the watch on Ebay and outbid me. Or other people stumble along and outbid me as well. If I lose no big deal, not like I need another watch as I just recently bought one. It's just that I'm into vintage watches, and if I can get a great deal for them it only helps to build my collection. Guess I'm a young guy with an old soul who yearns for simpler times.
 

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A lot could happen. Maybe you stumble along the watch on Ebay and outbid me. Or other people stumble along and outbid me as well. If I lose no big deal, not like I need another watch as I just recently bought one. It's just that I'm into vintage watches, and if I can get a great deal for them it only helps to build my collection. Guess I'm a young guy with an old soul who yearns for simpler times.
no worries about me, others yeah, snipers abound. one thing to notice is how many watchers there are. i just put a deposit on a rare 10yr old limited edition G-Shock and eyeballing a Bulova Skeleton.
 

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There are a whole bunch of pitfalls with vintage.

I snagged a cool looking Vulcain but neglected the fact that 35mm looks like a ladies watch on my wrist.

It also needs servicing. The movement runs and keeps time but I can't seem to get the day function to change.

A lot of times the seller will cover themselves by saying they don't know the service history. Just expect that you will need to service it in that case.

There's some good vintage watch eBay 101 videos on YouTube that I'd recommend if you're going to get into that hobby.

Oh, and you will not get that JLC for $9. All the bidding happens in the last few minutes of the auction. Put it on your watch list and then be prepared to fight for it at the end if you want it.

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After 3,000 transactions over 20 years on the bay, it is clear to me at least that most folks who actually win good watches (or anything else) at decent prices start by determining what price they think would be a price they feel comfortable with, then, they put the item on their "watch list" and wait. Then, at about 5 seconds left before the close of auction, they bid that amount--they either win it, or someone gets it for a price higher than you were willing to pay. The auctions where people nickel and dime price hikes well before closing are generally done by novices, and generally end up jacking the price up beyond reason. The only time I might bid before the last 5 seconds is simply as a "place holder" where no one has bid on the item, and I am afraid the seller might withdraw it.

In all cases, though, I would not be bidding on a potential piece of junk that may not be salvageable, unless it truly could be had for pennies on the dollar. Generally, you should leave "project" watches to those capable first hand of restoring the watch--not hoping to take it to somebody to do it for you.
 

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I usually don't worry about it being fake - if i found out it's a fake and nowhere in the description does it mention it's replica or hommage or anything to cover up it being a fake, then the seller is in more trouble than I am. Ebay protects buyers more than it does with sellers. Good luck with the auction
 

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I recently just rediscovered Ebay. I guess I was always just afraid to use it due to reasons you suggest. Too many times seeing fake watches on Ebay.

But I started looking for Seikos and other brands which are not faked (yea I know there are some fake Seikos, but it's not nearly as common).

It's probably bad I started using Ebay, because in the last like 6 months, I think I've bought like 5 watches, mostly because they were "too good" of a deal. Albeit 2 of them were less than $30, the other 3 were kinda expensive, but I probably could sell all of them pretty easily for the same price I paid.
 

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Depends on the watch. Is it something I can probably find later? If so I might put a bid in, but not worry overmuch. If it's something unusual...I once overpaid USD500 for a BIN watch on eBay, but I have never seen an example of that watch in that metal before or since and interestingly when I posted pics online, a former owner (from many years ago, he recognized the watch) contacted me to offer to buy the watch back. I do not regret overpaying for that watch (I regret not cross-checking the listing pics against other forums on which I'm a member, woulda saved me the money) because I feel the price paid was appropriate for that particular piece. I've pulled the BIN trigger on other unusual collectibles, too, in cases where I felt comfortable with the price and really wanted the item.
 

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I buy and sell all the time on eBay. I’m currently selling two of my Omegas there. Before buying, look at the seller’s ratings. I won’t buy from a seller who is new or has feedback less than 99.8%. I also only buy from US sellers preferably with more than 500 transactions.


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After 3,000 transactions over 20 years on the bay, it is clear to me at least that most folks who actually win good watches (or anything else) at decent prices start by determining what price they think would be a price they feel comfortable with, then, they put the item on their "watch list" and wait. Then, at about 5 seconds left before the close of auction, they bid that amount--they either win it, or someone gets it for a price higher than you were willing to pay. The auctions where people nickel and dime price hikes well before closing are generally done by novices, and generally end up jacking the price up beyond reason. The only time I might bid before the last 5 seconds is simply as a "place holder" where no one has bid on the item, and I am afraid the seller might withdraw it.
This is the "correct" way to bid to win an item at the lowest possible price. I can think of two reasons why someone wouldn't follow this strategy:
1. They haven't observed / thought through how eBay bidding works, or more likely,
2. They get a little bit of a thrill by being the high bidder, getting to daydream about how great it would be if they won the item at its then-current price

Actually, there have been times that I've deviated from the strategy, but that's generally when it's an item that's currently priced orders of magnitude below what it'll sell for. For example, if there's a $5000 watch that I'm seriously interested in and bids open at $100, I might put in a $4000 bid early on. This (a) helps reduce the number of bidders, and (b) gives the seller some confidence that the item will sell close to its market price.
 

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What AD actually will authenticate watches? Rolex, Chopard are the 2 I know for a fact wont do that, they need to be sent to the factory.
 

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After 3,000 transactions over 20 years on the bay, it is clear to me at least that most folks who actually win good watches (or anything else) at decent prices start by determining what price they think would be a price they feel comfortable with, then, they put the item on their "watch list" and wait. Then, at about 5 seconds left before the close of auction, they bid that amount--they either win it, or someone gets it for a price higher than you were willing to pay. The auctions where people nickel and dime price hikes well before closing are generally done by novices, and generally end up jacking the price up beyond reason. The only time I might bid before the last 5 seconds is simply as a "place holder" where no one has bid on the item, and I am afraid the seller might withdraw it.
This is the "correct" way to bid to win an item at the lowest possible price. I can think of two reasons why someone wouldn't follow this strategy:
1. They haven't observed / thought through how eBay bidding works, or more likely,
2. They get a little bit of a thrill by being the high bidder, getting to daydream about how great it would be if they won the item at its then-current price

Actually, there have been times that I've deviated from the strategy, but that's generally when it's an item that's currently priced orders of magnitude below what it'll sell for. For example, if there's a $5000 watch that I'm seriously interested in and bids open at $100, I might put in a $4000 bid early on. This (a) helps reduce the number of bidders, and (b) gives the seller some confidence that the item will sell close to its market price.
I agree with all of this.

And I think there is someone (not me) doing the latter strategy (i.e. reasonable bid early) right now with a Tudor Hydronaut 89190:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tudor-Tige...atic-mens-watch-w-date-Blue-dial/232814692350

A perfect example Tudor Hydronaut 89190 in mint condition with fresh service is maybe worth $2200. This one has the less desirable "Tiger" dial, has no stated service history, and the backside of the lugs seem to show perhaps a past polish of questionable quality. It's also dirty in the photos, and it's weird that they didn't center the rotating bezel. So as it sits, fair value for this watch might be $1600, so getting it for something like $1200 would be a steal or $1400 would be a great deal.

The current official bid as I'm typing this (on June 26) sits at $940, with the auction ending on June 28. But if you click the bid history, you can see that the current high bid (presumably more than $940) was placed on June 22, when the previous high bid was $350. This current high bid ($940+) would have displayed at $360 at the time due to eBay's incremental bidding, and you can see in the bid history that some clown came in right after and bid $361. The $940+ guy probably wanted to bid high enough early enough to signal to the seller that there is at least some meaningful interest.
 

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Off-topic, but I was literally just looking at that watch.

I agree with all of this.

And I think there is someone (not me) doing the latter strategy (i.e. reasonable bid early) right now with a Tudor Hydronaut 89190:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tudor-Tige...atic-mens-watch-w-date-Blue-dial/232814692350

A perfect example Tudor Hydronaut 89190 in mint condition with fresh service is maybe worth $2200. This one has the less desirable "Tiger" dial, has no stated service history, and the backside of the lugs seem to show perhaps a past polish of questionable quality. It's also dirty in the photos, and it's weird that they didn't center the rotating bezel. So as it sits, fair value for this watch might be $1600, so getting it for something like $1200 would be a steal or $1400 would be a great deal.

The current official bid as I'm typing this (on June 26) sits at $940, with the auction ending on June 28. But if you click the bid history, you can see that the current high bid (presumably more than $940) was placed on June 22, when the previous high bid was $350. This current high bid ($940+) would have displayed at $360 at the time due to eBay's incremental bidding, and you can see in the bid history that some clown came in right after and bid $361. The $940+ guy probably wanted to bid high enough early enough to signal to the seller that there is at least some meaningful interest.
 

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The only time I would bid at any other time other than the last 20 seconds is when the auction is ending at an unsociable time and I can't be bothered to stay up into the small hours. In that case, I have put in my high bid before going to bed and crossed fingers until the morning!

As a seller, though, I'm generally very pleased that there are people willing to make bids ahead of time.
 

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The only time I would bid at any other time other than the last 20 seconds is when the auction is ending at an unsociable time and I can't be bothered to stay up into the small hours. In that case, I have put in my high bid before going to bed and crossed fingers until the morning!

As a seller, though, I'm generally very pleased that there are people willing to make bids ahead of time.
On and off topic ...
I bought my Breitling from an eBay seller ... I was really sure it was genuine. I 'authenticated' it by sending it to Breitling for a service. It needed a full service, but it was all good and even with the price of the watch plus the price of the service, it was still a good deal.

A little off-topic ... you can use a service like Bidslamer to bid for you in the last couple seconds at your maximum bid ... and it prevents you from getting 'caught up' with the bidding.
 
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