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I currently own a black dial BP 5010 but have long lusted after a BP perpetual calendar. I’m particularly attracted to the Rodeo Drive version but have admired nearly all of them.

That being said they rarely get discussed here and rarely come up for sale used. Not specifically referring to the Rodeo Drive version but any BP perpetual calendar model.

Is the lack of conversation and activity on the secondary market just because they don’t sell too many of them? Or when they do sell they rarely come up for resale because owners are so happy with them?

Obviously they are quite expensive so I suspect the answer might be a bit of both but wondering how many people here either own one or have insights to share? All opinions welcome
 

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They are the cheapest REAL perpetual calendar in the market.
But they are really too big for most people, and too dressy for big wrist
Most of all, they are very hard to use, no way to independently adjust any, jump one day more you have to send it back, at least 3 -6 months at repair shop

thus, not so popular
 

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They are the cheapest REAL perpetual calendar in the market.
But they are really too big for most people, and too dressy for big wrist
Most of all, they are very hard to use, no way to independently adjust any, jump one day more you have to send it back, at least 3 -6 months at repair shop

thus, not so popular
if you adjust one day more just let the power run out.

Just curious. what are examples of non-real perpetual calendars out in the market?
 

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They are the cheapest REAL perpetual calendar in the market.
But they are really too big for most people, and too dressy for big wrist
Most of all, they are very hard to use, no way to independently adjust any, jump one day more you have to send it back, at least 3 -6 months at repair shop

thus, not so popular
Very few perpetual calendars allow the user to go backwards, and most are adjusted via multiple pushers....I'm not sure how having everything controlled by the crown makes it "very hard to use".

And what makes it "real", compared to say the JLC Master Control perpetual, which displays exactly the same information but is significantly less expensive?

Yes, the BP is huge, which is unfortunate - way too big for me, but it's one of the best looking perpetual calendars around (in my opinion).
 

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if you adjust one day more just let the power run out.

Just curious. what are examples of non-real perpetual calendars out in the market?
IWC version can auto jump at leap year, most other cheap versions cannot, many cannot jump at 2/28 to 3/1, have to manually do the adjustment. So IWC version is the real PC.

IWC version has relatively higher rate of failure. It uses click springs so slightly change of tension will cause over jump one year. JLC one does not have year indicator, plus it is independently adjustable, so easy to fix any error.
 

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IWC version can auto jump at leap year, most other cheap versions cannot, many cannot jump at 2/28 to 3/1, have to manually do the adjustment. So IWC version is the real PC.

IWC version has relatively higher rate of failure. It uses click springs so slightly change of tension will cause over jump one year. JLC one does not have year indicator, plus it is independently adjustable, so easy to fix any error.
dont all perpetual calendars auto-jump at leap year? Those that dont are either just annual calendars or complete/triple calendars?

or maybe am not understanding “auto jump” accurately. What is an actual watch model that is a perpetual calendar but non-real?
 

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IWC version can auto jump at leap year, most other cheap versions cannot, many cannot jump at 2/28 to 3/1, have to manually do the adjustment. So IWC version is the real PC.

IWC version has relatively higher rate of failure. It uses click springs so slightly change of tension will cause over jump one year. JLC one does not have year indicator, plus it is independently adjustable, so easy to fix any error.
dkbs, I'm afraid you're misinformed. The ability to jump from Feb 28-March 1 (and account for leap years) is the very definition of a perpetual calendar; if it can't, it's an annual calendar, and is advertised as such.

The JLC Master Ultra Thin Perpetual does indeed have a year indicator, and while it is adjusted by various pushers, none of the indications can move backwards. You're simply incorrect. If you do a search on the JLC forum, you'll find several owners who have advanced too far (way too far!) and had to send it back to JLC. The only QP (that I'm aware of) that is freely adjustable in both directions is made by Ulysse Nardin.
 

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This discussion got me curious, so I've done a bit of digging - the JLC Master Ultra Thin Perpetual actually uses the Kurt Klaus calendar module - exactly the same as in the BP. The only difference is that in the JLC, all indications are advanced by a single pusher as opposed to the crown. None can be adjusted independently, nor move backwards. The same functionality for 2/3 the price of the BP. @dkbs, I'm afraid you're mistaken on all counts.

OP, to your original question - my feeling is that there aren't as many of them, they're very big, and they're very expensive. Those points alone would narrow down the market to a quite a niche buyer. And at that price point, they're competing with a lot of other very interesting watches.
 

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IWC version can auto jump at leap year, most other cheap versions cannot, many cannot jump at 2/28 to 3/1, have to manually do the adjustment. So IWC version is the real PC.

IWC version has relatively higher rate of failure. It uses click springs so slightly change of tension will cause over jump one year. JLC one does not have year indicator, plus it is independently adjustable, so easy to fix any error.
Interesting what you say concerning the failure rate. This sounds like a common issue with perpetual calendars.

 
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