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I wonder how do people think of Bovet watches. It has some unconventional complications that rival many top brands, beautiful unique movement engraving similar to Lange and overall design look similar to Breguet. How will it stand among current well-known top high-end players?
 

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Like Bovet a lot – it easily stands along side the well known brands, and probably eclipses many of their similarly priced models.
I’m not sure if not having a couple of classical style pieces is a hinderance to their wider acceptance or the best strategy, since they won’t be compared directly – like MB&F, De Bethune, Christophe Claret, etc – and therefore appeal to a whole different type of buyer/collector.
 

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Bovet is "the" watchmaker of skeleton watches. I can't think of one that comes close. And, of course, they earn Fleurier quality for their pieces.

All the best.
 
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^
Are they?
I thought Armin Strom was the skeleton-meister?
I can see some other watches being thought of as "the" thing in skeleton watches. I think among watches that fall in the category of what I describe as "dial removal" skeletons, Armin Strom does a very fine job, and I'd say a far better job that the rest of that genre for it's obvious that there's more going on than a subtractive approach to the structural supports for the movement.





And there's no question that AS are in the same league, and these two pieces certainly come close to what Bovet put out.









What I don't see from AS' skeletonized watches is taking the thing to the next level to create a watch that tells its story from both sides, making it a functioning work of horological art from both the front and back of the watch. And, importantly for a skeleton, I would care to see far more light passing through the watch.











Bovet 1822 Ottantasei 10-Day Flying Tourbillon -- This is the first Bovet skeleton I've seen that I don't much like, and the rear of the watch is why. It's that it's not great skeletonizing, it's that it doesn't have the balance they put in their other pieces.













Bovet Pininfarina OttantaTre -- A contemporary implementation of the Virtuoso design language.









Louis Moinet Sideralis Evo





Ulysses Nardin Executive Skeleton










Rudis Sylva - RS 16 Harmonious Oscillator (See also this.) Thought this is cool approach to presenting a skeleton watch...exposing the main plate and using it as a palette of sorts.









Bovet do, however, offer watches that aren't skeletonized yet on the back and front they retain Bovet's commitment to artistic symmetry. Where else have you seen a watchmaker show off like that, finishing the dial side as and maintaining the symmetry on the dial side and the back?





I can't lie...When asked to choose between symmetrical styling and non-symmetrical, I strongly prefer the former, though I appreciate asymmetrical balance quite a lot. AS certainly have the symmetry happening on the front of their pieces. I just don't see them as rivaling Bovet, or even the other pieces above the top of skeletonizing where there is lots of light passing between the bones and the watch is designed from the ground up expressly to make that happen. Others may disagree....

All the best.
 

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Thanks Tony for going to the trouble of pulling all those images into this thread, and I would tend to align my thoughts with your own vis-a-vis symmetry preference – although there are times when an asymmetrical design is so well implemented that really works.
Love that Bovet 19 Thirty, and the Rudis Sylva is a new one for me – I’d say the grey (Ruthenium?) plates version looks the better of the two.

I will say though, as comprehensive as your reply is, you've missed a few others that set my boat afloat…
Arnold & Son – so many fantastic looking pieces, not just the obvious Time Pyramid.
Angelus – U20 is just wonderful and the right balance of casualness and elegance.
Roger Dubuis Excalibur – except the tourbillon and double tourbillon, which are marginal and don’t work, respectively.
Piaget Altiplano – no mean feat given the slimness of the movement to begin with.

However, I think we should get back to the Bovets that the OP was interested in discussing and knowing more about.
 

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Thanks Tony for going to the trouble of pulling all those images into this thread, and I would tend to align my thoughts with your own vis-a-vis symmetry preference – although there are times when an asymmetrical design is so well implemented that really works.
Love that Bovet 19 Thirty, and the Rudis Sylva is a new one for me – I’d say the grey (Ruthenium?) plates version looks the better of the two.

I will say though, as comprehensive as your reply is, you've missed a few others that set my boat afloat…
Arnold & Son – so many fantastic looking pieces, not just the obvious Time Pyramid.
Angelus – U20 is just wonderful and the right balance of casualness and elegance.
Roger Dubuis Excalibur – except the tourbillon and double tourbillon, which are marginal and don’t work, respectively.
Piaget Altiplano – no mean feat given the slimness of the movement to begin with.

However, I think we should get back to the Bovets that the OP was interested in discussing and knowing more about.
The symmetry plays a big role in the overall aesthetics, and yes, asymmetrical can be quite stunning too. As goes skeletonizing, though, in my mind at least, it's the amount of open space that sets Bovet and the others noted apart from AS, PP, AP and so on.

Truly, though, it's really hard, and almost not too relevant to try to rank makers and watches that executed at the level we're talking. The only ranking that matters is one's own that leads one to prefer one piece (not brand, because all of them have the ability to do it; it's just a matter of what they choose to do) over another.

Patek Philippe










Vacheron





But back to Bovet....They certainly do less lofty pieces than their skeletons. I think among the Fleurier makers, Bovet is by far the nicest and most innovative. Their Amadeo system -- that's the feature that gives the wrist, tabletop and pocket watch flexibility -- really makes them different. For them, it's always about the art every bit as much as the time.

Bovet Rising Star AIRS028 -- Triple time zone tourbillon





Bovet Recital 20 -- Night sky annual calendar







Bovet Recital 17 -- Triple time zone with Northern and Southern hemisphere moonphase







Anyway, I think you get the idea. Bovet is a maker that does watches for folks who want something that really stands apart in every way -- physically, horologically and artistically. Of course, all that doesn't come inexpensively. But that never is the point, is it, when it comes to fine watches like Bovet's.

All the best.
 
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