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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Although slogans are created in marketing departments, watch philosophies aren't
I know of Rolex slogan:
"Every Rolex tells a story", but not sure if they spelled out the guiding principle of their watch designs or a brand philosophy. They very well might, I just do not know and am interested to learn what are some of the brands vision for their watches.

The most clear I know of is Grand Seiko one. Here it is (c) ikigai-watches.com:
  • First of all, a Grand Seiko has to be accurate. The quest for the ultimate precision and accuracy is one of the most important part of Grand Seiko’s DNA.
  • A Grand Seiko has to be legible. What’s the point of wearing a watch if you have to squint and squirm to decipher the time ?
  • A Grand Seiko has to be durable. Durable means the movement has to be very reliable. Durable also means the design has to be simple enough for the watch to remain a beautiful object even as fashion and cultural trends change over the decades.
GS Heritage collection is one true example of the Company following their philosophy. Look at any modern GS, e.g., SBGD201


and the "defining" Taro Tanaka's 44GS model.

And GS slogan is also very clear too - "The pure essentials of watchmaking, elevated to the level of Art".

I am interested to learn what other brands and esp. the ones at the top of the food chain have to explain their vision for the watches they make and their mission spelled out in their slogans, if you will.
 

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Seiko, “Always one step ahead of the rest”, they strive to be technologically advanced.

Seiko, “Moving ahead. Touching hearts.”, they sure make watches that I find endearing.

“The Rolex Way”, well researched and continuously improved manufacturing make some loved watches with amazing on-hand look/feel.

Seiko, “With no hurry or rest”, steady and continuous improvements. Kind of like Rolex, but maybe quality sometimes compromised to achieve affordability and volume.
 

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I see me wearing a watch then read the brand’s slogan and laugh. If ever a brand comes out with “watches for scruffs” I’ll know they are talking about me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Still think most of these come from the marketing departments
Slogans sure do.
Design principles (e.g., GS Grammar of Design) comes from designers, obviously.
Watch brand philosophies and vision of what a brand wants to achieve is coming from top management / owners.

I could not find any spelled out visions of what their watch should be from any other brand but GS.
At certain point in their history I am sure every brand had certain vision and objectives. One obvious example would be BP after it was acquired by JCB - mechanical watch at it best, never quartz.

Did anyone come around this type of statements from other brands? It would be interesting to see what these brands want their watches to be thought of.
 

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Not sure if it's their slogan, but a pamphlet for the Breguet Marine an AD gave me states "History is still being written." I'm really drawn to that
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
AP's slogan: “To Break the Rules You Must First Master Them”.
PP's "You never actually own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation."
I am more interested in the brand philosophies rather than slogans though.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OK, here is the philosophy and the vision from Rolex page:
"For Hans Wilsdorf, the brand’s founder, it was essential that each Rolex watch give the exact time and that its movement be protected in the best way. More than a hundred years after the first models were created, this philosophy still underpins the development and production of every watch stamped with the emblematic crown."
and
"...employees sharing a passion for excellence, innovation and improvement. They have always been united in one aim – to achieve the best possible quality while striving for perfection. "

A bit less explicit than GS's, but clear nevertheless..
 

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Discussion Starter #12
VC on the other hand, seems to have their philosophies defined by a model.
Here is one for the Overseas:
"The openness to the world bequeathed by François Constantin has remained at the core of the Maison’s philosophy ever since its founding. Designed in a spirit of casual elegance and comfort enhanced by their self-interchangeable strap system, Overseas timepieces are perfect daily companions for both exceptional and everyday travels. "

Here is another for the ref 57260
"Masters of their professions and true scholars, they based their expertise on vast scientific knowledge and a curiosity for new ideas, nurtured by the philosophy of the Enlightenment. In their hands were born exceptional timepieces of rare technical and aesthetic complexity, inspired by astronomy, science and art, to which they paid tribute. "

Even less explicit and more marketing oriented.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I failed to find a philosophy or guiding principles for Omega watches, however the slogan is clear:
"Omega – Exact time for life".
 

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Seiko in Kanji “精工” means “fine/refined/excellent, work/craft”. I feel like my Seiko watches are examples of excellent work. They are not perfect, but I feel like they try, with unique invention like Magic Lever, or movement offering like Kinetic that other companies don’t offer.
 

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Let's bear in mind that the only point of a slogan as part of branding is to sell products. Most large watch companies want consumers to connect with slogans and fall in with brand identity; if and when that happens, and an affinity is created, then loyalty, buzz and a well-defined market niche follow.

Slogans and branding are, as others in this thread have said, usually the creation of marketing departments. They are based as much on market research as they are on founding principles. And sometimes, the marketing priorities of today are far removed from the principles of yesterday. Rolex is a great example of this: in its first fifty years, it innovated and took risks and hustled. It's an amazing story. In the last fifty years it's become a remarkably steady ship. That's also an amazing story, but a very different one.

While slogans and branding make me curious, I rarely allow them to pull me in. What I will do is dig as deep as possible to cut past the fluff. That means ignoring horrible Hodinkee adverticles and the like from the very start. There's nothing as satisfying as a thorough interrogation of a company's performance over a long period of time. Once you've dug as deep as available information allows, you can come away with a better grasp of what a watch company is about.

Here's an example. I have a Patek Philippe pocket watch made in 1903. I love it and cherish it. At that time, the company entered lots of independent chronometry competitions and frequently won. It was an exclusive watchmaker then as it is now but it was also objectively one of the best at timekeeping. Today, Patek Philippe avoids independent assessments like the plague and assesses itself (how convenient, no?). Instead of standing up to competition, it prefers to spin yarns about how excellent and exclusive it is. Does it still make nice watches? Of course. Do I respect them? Hmm. I have more respect for the hungry company it was 115 years ago than for the smarmy, self-congratulatory business it is today. The knock-on effects of this pivot are also unhealthy, in my view. It makes some owners of Patek Philippe insufferably smug. Some people just can't help themselves.

No surprise there, then. Slogans and branding efforts shape the behaviour of enthusiasts by the hundreds of thousands. That's why large numbers of watch enthusiasts can't get enough of Omega's Speedmaster or Seamaster, but ignore its quiet, excellent De Ville line. It's why thousands upon thousands of watch fans go crazy over Rolex sports watches and can't fathom why the brand continues to produce the Cellini. It's why Grand Seiko enjoys such popularity for its spring drive movement (well merited) but also why people are willing to overlook one of the worst executions of a power reserve indicator on any luxury watch today. If the dial on the Snowflake was the work of a single artist, that power reserve indicator was the compromise decision of a committee.

But like everyone else here, I'm biased. My bias is against larded up sloganeering and branding that intends to conceal as much as to reveal. As such, I don't accept claims of "in-house" and "hand-finished" watches unless I have a better idea the industrial processes and work flows involved. Unsurprisingly, a lot of this stuff stays hidden from public view. This creates a reality gap that is filled by carefully composed messages of inspiration and aspiration that we inject into our veins.
 

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Haha, I think for sure there is some degree of self-identifying with a brand. i.e. "This brand/company thinks/feels like me" or "I agree with this or think this is good".

Not as much a slogan, but more to the heart of philosophy, or what the company thinks or tries to do? For sure there's beaucoup marketing feel-good spin, but there's also some truth to what they think? (Emphasis mine.)
“We have created a new hand-winding function and a second-hand halt mechanism function have been created to improve the practicability of the movement. To deliver the robustness that the name of Seiko 5 Sports deserves, we have improved the position and shape of several parts of the movement. Seiko 5 Sports is not a watch just for special people. It is a mechanical watch that anyone around the world can wear and our duty to our customers is to constantly improve and evolve the design of our movements, using Seiko’s accumulated technology to provide higher value than ever before.”
 

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Although slogans are created in marketing departments, watch philosophies aren't
I know of Rolex slogan:
"Every Rolex tells a story", but not sure if they spelled out the guiding principle of their watch designs or a brand philosophy. They very well might, I just do not know and am interested to learn what are some of the brands vision for their watches.

The most clear I know of is Grand Seiko one. Here it is (c) ikigai-watches.com:
  • First of all, a Grand Seiko has to be accurate. The quest for the ultimate precision and accuracy is one of the most important part of Grand Seiko’s DNA.
  • A Grand Seiko has to be legible. What’s the point of wearing a watch if you have to squint and squirm to decipher the time ?
  • A Grand Seiko has to be durable. Durable means the movement has to be very reliable. Durable also means the design has to be simple enough for the watch to remain a beautiful object even as fashion and cultural trends change over the decades.
GS Heritage collection is one true example of the Company following their philosophy. Look at any modern GS, e.g., SBGD201


and the "defining" Taro Tanaka's 44GS model.

And GS slogan is also very clear too - "The pure essentials of watchmaking, elevated to the level of Art".

I am interested to learn what other brands and esp. the ones at the top of the food chain have to explain their vision for the watches they make and their mission spelled out in their slogans, if you will.
Slogans and marketing don't impress me but I would be so interested in a GS if they didn't use those damn Dauphine hands on everything. They simply don't look good, IMO, with their indices. Otherwise, really great watches (that all look mostly the same).
 

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Slogans and marketing don't impress me but I would be so interested in a GS if they didn't use those damn Dauphine hands on everything. They simply don't look good, IMO, with their indices. Otherwise, really great watches (that all look mostly the same).
Amen brother, seems like they use the Model T Henry Ford approach to their designs, with just a little twist. Instead of any color as long as its black, the GS selection is any color as long as its black, white, or beige/champagne.

Then they throw out a hundred LEs year with slightly less boring colors, at elevated prices, to make them seem more desirable. Or the color of the second hand is different, woo hoo!!!

Tried to buy one several times, just couldn't find anything that was interesting enough to buy once I saw it sitting on my wrist, but to be fair I only looked at spring drive. The diver wasn't boring looking, but unless you like strapping a hockey puck to your wrist (without a micro-adjustable bracelet for $7k) the dimensions may not be all that appealing to the average buyer.
 

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Now, regular Seikos have lots of interesting designs. Too bad they don't seem to want to incorporate those in the GS line. Then again, I only own one Seiko that I've had for over 30 years and it's the best looking (albeit slightly dated with the TT) Seiko dial I've ever seen. I don't recall their slogan in those days but it was all about the incredible quartz movement.
 
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