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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm trying to buy a 1570 movement.

I missed out on one that was located in the US (I'm in NC.)

There's one in Seoul, South Korea on ebay that looks good to me, and if it ends anywhere near my budget, I'm tempted to go for it.

My fear is, will US Customs sieze the movement? It's listed with dial and hands, and of course the movement and dial are labeled Rolex - Will ICE see this as trademark infringement?

Advice welcome.
 

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hmmm... I'd guess is that it "should be" okay being that it's just the movement and not a complete wearable watch.

Would it be any different if a person bought "pieces" of a banned firearm and put it together themselves?

What I'm trying to say is that PIECES of an item shouldn't violate any rules or laws but a complete "fully-functioning" item will.
 

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Yep, I believe they can seize it. Rolex's trademark recordation with Customs: "Import of Goods Bearing Genuine Trademarks or Trade Names Restricted."

In other words, genuine Rolex products can only be imported with the permission of the trademark owner, Rolex Watch U.S.A. Inc. You can hand carry one Rolex watch from a trip overseas without obtaining permission, but purchasing one by mail is a definite violation, and bringing back more than one will get the others seized.

Since the movement itself is trademarked, I suspect the fact that it's not the entire watch will have no bearing.

My understanding is that Rolex is not the only brand that does this.

Jeannie
 

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It'll be seized, I would have thought, because of the movement bearing trademarks. As Jeannie said, this is against Rolex's policies.

cheers.
 

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Perhaps the way to phrase the answer is that it MAY be seized. Rolex, as stated does protect its trademark and the customs people do the enforcement. Now, there's no guaranty that customs won't pick that package out of all the others to inspect, but it can be done, especially for just a movement and not a whole, complete watch. It's a risk and only the buyer can assess just how much of a risk to take.
 

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Gentlemen, whether the package is inspected and seized or not, it is still a Customs violation to import Rolex trademarked products. Posts advising the OP on how to bypass legitimate Customs laws and regulations will not be permitted per WUS rule #8.

Thank you.

Jeannie
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mod, friends,

I didn't intend to ask for advice on how to circumvent customs. I was asking for advice on the relationship between Rolex and enforcement, so that I could determine whether or not I should attempt to acquire parts from outside the US.

It seems to me to be too risky, and problematic with trademark enforcement.
 

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I didn't intend to ask for advice on how to circumvent customs.
Of course not. I never though you did. However, threads are organic things and often grow beyond the OP's original query and in ways he/she didn't predict. In this particular case, it was growing in a direction that violates WUS rules. Not your fault.

Jeannie
 

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Customs aside, I would be cautious about purchasing an older Rolex movement without being able to carefully inspect it first, or have an iron-clad method of return if it turns to be not as described...

and this doesn't even address why you would need a full movement for a Rolex.. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Customs aside, I would be cautious about purchasing an older Rolex movement without being able to carefully inspect it first, or have an iron-clad method of return if it turns to be not as described...

and this doesn't even address why you would need a full movement for a Rolex.. ;)
You're right about not being able to inspect or return. That's definitely another risk of not purchasing locally.

Why I need a full movement for a Rolex:

I am a WIS with perhaps a smaller level of funding than some of you may be equipped with. I spend most of my income on my family, including my daughters, one of whom undergoes many therapies to address her autism.

Which isn't to say that I don't like to wear something nice on my wrist, just that it can't cost as much as Rolex is charging for new.

I have a MKii LRRP that is similar to a 1655, an MKii Seiko SM300/Milsub mod, a Yobokies mod, and a Homer Simpson quartz watch my wife bought me 10 years ago.

I wanted a Rolex, but I wanted the impossible: a 6541.

I've always been a tinkerer. I bought a guitar, taught myself to play. Then I taught myself to repair them. Then I taught myself to build them.

So I bought a Datejust 1601 case, a 6541 dial, hands with the lightning bolt, a crystal without the cyclops, a stainless smooth bezel rather than the fluted variety, and a stainless crown and stem.

I don't really care to get into a discussion about authenticity, value, or the like: This is my project watch, and I will consider it a Rolex because it will be powered by a 1570 movement. I'd accept a 1520/1530, etc.

I know that no RSC will ever be willing to service it, at least not without restoring it to proper 1601 specifications. I know that it will never be worth money to another person on the planet.

That's not the point. The point is a Rolex I can afford, a Rolex that is tastefully customized to my liking (by which I mean, no outrageous bling), one that no-one else on earth will have (ignoring whether anyone would want one like mine) and one that I've got my hands involved in the making, not just the money I can set aside.

I mean, I'd also quite like a 1675 from my birth year - but that's not going to happen on the funds I can set aside for timepieces. Family first.

I know my limitations. I have not studied watchmaking, and do not wish to assemble a movement piece by piece. I know that buying pieces is more readily available, but would also be more expensive than buying a whole movement. My ideal situation is to assemble using a working movement that has been recently serviced. I'd settle for a working movement that needs servicing from an independent watchmaker.

I do not consider myself a watchmaker, merely an assembler - but this is how I start learning.

I'm sorry for any offense this causes the purists among us. I justify it on the basis that a 6541 is simply unattainable. This project isn't for you, it's for me.
 
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